10K Training : Novice

Hal on his Novice Program

HOW MUCH DO YOU NEED TO TRAIN TO RUN 10K? If you possess a good level of fitness (because of participation in other sports) you probably could run a half dozen miles on very little training. That might include running shorter races, such as a 5K or an 8K.

But if you’ve made the decision to run a 10K race you might as well do it right. Following is an eight-week training schedule to help get you to the finish line of a 10K. (For those metrically challenged, 10K is 6.2 miles.)

The program is designed for beginning runners, but experienced runners like it too, because of its gentle approach. To participate in this 10K program, you should have no major health problems, and perhaps have done at least some jogging or walking. If running 2.5 miles for your first workout on Tuesday of the first week seems too difficult, you might want to pause before taking your first steps. If you have more than eight weeks before your 10K, switch to an easier (shorter) schedule to build an endurance base.

The terms used in the training schedule are somewhat obvious, but let me explain what I mean anyway.

Rest: The first word you encounter in the 10K Novice Program, and in many of my other training plans from 5K to the marathon, is “rest.” I suggest you rest on Fridays before your weekend workouts and on Mondays after those workouts. You can’t train efficiently if fatigued. Take rest days seriously.

Running workouts: As a novice, don’t worry about how fast you run; just cover the distance–or approximately the distance suggested each day. Ideally, you should be able to run at a pace that allows you to converse comfortably with any training partners. In the 10K Novice plan, you run three days of the week: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

Cross-Training: On the schedule, this is identified simply as “cross.” Wednesdays and Saturdays are cross-training days: swimming, cycling, walking, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, or other forms of aerobic training. But don’t cross-train too vigorously. Cross-training days should be easy days.

Long Runs: The longest runs are planned for Sundays, since you probably have more time to do them on the weekends. If Sunday isn’t a convenient day for your long runs, feel free to do them on Saturday, cross-training on Sundays. What pace should you run? Go slow. Don’t be afraid to take walking breaks. Just cover the distance.

Strength Training: Have you lifted before? If not, you may not want to start the same time you start a running program. Tuesdays and Thursdays are good days for strength training–after your run. Stretching also is important to keep your muscles loose.

Walking: Walking is an excellent exercise that a lot of runners overlook in their training. In the training schedule below, I don’t specify walking workouts, but feel free to walk during your running workouts any time you feel tired or need a break. (Be aware that I have a separate 10K walking program if you decide to walk rather than run your goal 10K.)

The following schedule is only a guide. If necessary, you can make minor modifications to suit your work and family schedule. The interactive programs available from TrainingPeaks offer much more detailed instructions.

About The Plan

This schedule is for you if you are stepping up to 10K race for the first time. You’ll do three runs a week and start your training by building up a mixture of walking and running and then gradually do more running. You’ll develop an understanding of different running speeds and your stamina to complete the 10K distance will increase as the weeks progress.

Paced/power walking

Paced or power walking is walking at a fast pace to get fitter. If you’ve never run a step before and are uncertain that you can, then kick off with a gentle walking programme before starting with a running plan. Paced walking isn’t heading out for a casual stroll, equally it’s not race walking at top speed, rather, it’s walking at a brisk pace. Get into a smooth rhythm as you walk.

Walk/run

This is a combination of paced walking interspersed with light jogging. The amount of time you spend walking and jogging can and should vary. As you get fitter, you’ll spend more time jogging and less time walking. Landmarks such as lampposts, street corners, road junctions and trees make excellent targets to jog to, or walk between.

These are slow runs or jogs. During an easy run you should feel relaxed. You should be breathing comfortably and be capable of holding a conversation throughout the run. If you can’t, you’re going too fast – slow down, walk if necessary. An easy run should feel comfortable and is a natural progression from your walk/jog/walk introduction.

As a beginner, many of your first runs as you build and progress into a running programme will be made up of easy runs, but as you improve your easy runs will become ‘easier’ and you’ll want to include other types of running in your training.

During a steady run, conversation is still possible but it’s certainly harder to keep it flowing. You should feel in control during a steady run; it should feel manageable but you are working and concentrating. You might only be able to manage short time periods to begin with but as your fitness builds your ability to run for longer at a steady pace will improve.

The Plan

The Beginner’s Plan is available to download and print as a PDF, or you can view the full training schedule below.

  • 10 Weeks to 10K: Beginner’s Plan (PDF)

10 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Walk 5 mins, run 5 mins easy, walk 2 mins, run 5 mins easy, walks 5 mins (Total: 22 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Walk 5 mins, run 5 mins easy, walk 2 mins, run 5 mins easy, walk 2 mins, run 5 mins easy, walk 5 mins (Total: 29 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 10 mins easy, walk 5 mins, run 10 mins easy, walk 5 mins (30 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

9 Weeks To Go

8 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Walk 5 mins, walk/run 20 mins easy, walk 5 mins (Total: 30 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 5 mins easy, (run for 1 min steady, walk 2 mins to recover) repeat 5 times, run 5 mins easy (Total: 25 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Walk/run 30 mins easy (Total: 30 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

7 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 30 mins easy (Total: 30 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 5 mins easy, (run 2 mins steady, 2 mins walk/jog recovery) repeat 5 times, run 5 mins easy (Total: 30 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 40 mins easy (Total: 40 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

6 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 30 mins easy (Total: 30 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 5 mins easy, (run 3 mins steady, 2 mins walk/jog recovery) repeat 5 times, run 5 mins easy (Total: 35 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 25 mins easy, walk 3 mins, walk/run 25 mins continuously (Total: 53 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

5 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 35 mins easy (Total: 35 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 10 mins easy, (run 4 mins steady, 1 min walk/jog) repeat 5 times, run 10 mins easy (Total: 45 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 30 mins easy, walk/run 30 mins continuously (Total: 60 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

4 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 35 mins easy (Total: 35 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 10 mins easy, (run 5 mins steady, 30 secs walk/jog) repeat 6 times, run 10 mins easy (Total: 53 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 40 mins continuously, walk/run 30 mins (Total: 70 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

3 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 40 mins easy (Total: 40 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 10 mins easy run, (run 6 mins steady, 30 secs walk/jog) repeat 6 times, run 10 mins easy (Total: 59 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 70 mins continuously – it’s okay to include short walk breaks! (Total: 70 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

2 Weeks To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 20 mins easy (Total: 20 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Run 10 mins, (run 10 mins steady, 2 mins easy run) repeat 3 times, run 10 mins easy (Total: 56 mins)

FRIDAY

Rest

SATURDAY

Run 50 mins easy (Total: 50 mins)

SUNDAY

Rest

1 Week To Go

MONDAY

Rest

TUESDAY

Run 30 mins easy (Total: 30 mins)

WEDNESDAY

Rest

THURSDAY

Rest

FRIDAY

Run 20 mins easy (Total: 20 mins)

SATURDAY

Rest

SUNDAY

Light jog 10-15 minutes – take it easy before Race Day! (Total: 10-15 mins)

Race Day

MONDAY

10K Race Day. Good luck! You can do it.

It’s no surprise that the 10K is by far the country’s most popular type of race. To say it’s a versatile distance is an under-statement. Take a cross-section of any 10K field and you’ll find a variety of different runners – some tackling it as their first run beyond five miles, others using it to stretch out their legs in company, whilst some will make it the focus of their whole season.

Whether this is your first 10K, or you’re looking for a training schedule to increase your pace, we’ve got everything you need in our definitive guide to running a 10K.

How far is a 10K in miles?

In miles, a 10K race is 6.2 miles long.

How much time do I need to train for a 10K?

The variety of schedules available are based on two things: how often you can train and how long you have till the race. From two-week training plans, to eight-week training plans, we’ve broken things down to help make things easier. One thing’s for sure: whether you’re a beginner, a one-off runner doing this for charity, or a seasoned club runner out for a new PB, this is your route to your best-possible, and most enjoyable, result.

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What time should I aim for?

If you’re a complete beginner, don’t start out with an overly ambitious goal. To give yourself a ballpark 10K target, see how far you can run at a sustainable pace in 15-20 minutes. Then measure this distance in miles, divide the time by the distance and multiply the result by 6.2 to get a rough figure for your first 10K race. If at that math sounds a little too complicated, try our race time predictor tool.

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For experienced runners, you can be a bit more structured. If you can run 5-6 x 1K or 3-4 x 1 mile at your target 10K pace with three minute recoveries, you should be able to hit your goal. We’ve also got time related 10K training plans below to help you reach your goal.

Sign up to a race

The best 10K training plans:

We’ve broken our training plans down into time before the event, and runs per week to help you find the best schedule for you.

Two-week 10K training plans

Two weeks put you in a sort of no man’s land – you can’t improve a great deal in such a short time, but you can do some useful sessions to prepare for the race. If you’re a relatively new runner, it should allow you to learn to run with a degree of efficiency and economy. Regular runners can use the fortnight to fine-tune their existing fitness and practice running at 10K pace.

2 week 10K training plans

Four-week 10K training plans

Four weeks is long enough to improve your fitness and put a little edge of speed in your legs. There are three schedule options here: one for runners who can spare three days a week to train; one for five days a week; and one for six or seven days a week. Each option loosely relates to a range of target 10K times, and these are shown at the top of each schedule.

The most basic option does assume you’re already running a minimum of three times and 16-20 miles a week, so if you’ve never run before but you’re committed to running a 10K in four weeks’ time you’d be best to simply focus on building up the length of your runs, rather than following the more speed-orientated structure of these schedules.

4 week 10k training plans

Eight-week 10K training plans

You can really see your 10K fitness rocket over a preparation period of eight weeks. As with the four-week schedules, it’s important that you’re flexible in your approach. If the 10K is your single focus for the season and you’re willing to do everything you can for a best-possible time, you can add a two-to-four-month build-up period to the schedules, in which you focus on establishing a steady, solid mileage background.

Three-times-a-week runners should build up to a regular 20-25 weekly miles; five-times-a-week runners to 35-40 miles; and those training 6-7 times a week to 45-50 miles. You can vary your pace slightly to maintain interest during these build-up weeks, but save the real speed work for the final eight-week focus.

8 week 10K training plans

How should I pace on the day?

If this is your first 10K, try and run evenly – a fast start will often mean a painful finish. If you have a target of 60 minutes, you should aim to pass each kilometre marker at six-minute intervals. If you feel great near the end, pick up the pace and speed up.

What should I eat the night before a 10K?

SiS nutritionist Emma Barraclough shared the following top tips on how best to fuel your body for a 10K race, and what you should be eating during training.

How much water should I drink during a 10K race?

This depends on a few things – the weather on the day and whether you are properly hydrated before you start racing. A sub-40-minute athlete on a cool day would be fine without stopping for water, a beginner would benefit from the liquid and the opportunity to walk through the drinks station. Use your judgement, but either way, try to resume your normal running rhythm as soon as possible after a station. Find more commonly asked questions before running a 10K here.

I’m finding my training difficult – what should I do?

Whether you’ve got the speed, but are struggling with the endurance, or are an endurance runner struggling to speed up, we’ve found the solutions to the most common 10K problems here.

How to develop a fast finish

5K and 10K Training Plans for Beginners

Running a 5K or 10K is a fantastic way to get fit, shed weight and establish a long-term fitness goal. Even if you’ve never run before, it’s possible to complete a 3.1-mile (5K) or even a 6.2-mile (10K) event if you’re smart about preparing to go the distance.

Road Runners Club of America–certified coach Deborah Brooks says that many new runners take on too much and underestimate the time commitment involved with training properly for a race. This can lead to burnout and poor performance. So where should a new runner start once she’s made the decision to train for a race?

  1. Pick a race. Register for an event so you can have a goal to work toward.
  2. Set a goal for the race. Make sure the achievement is realistic and in tune with your current fitness level. For example, if you’ve never run a race before, planning to complete the event—hopefully with a smile on your face—is a perfectly reasonable and still challenging goal.
  3. Give yourself ample time to prepare for the event. If you’re new to running, plan to invest 3–4 months in training, with the final prep week culminating with your goal race.
  4. Pick a training plan that’s suited for your level. Brooks cautions that one training plan doesn’t fit all, and that runners should use it as a guide to individualize based on running history, prior injuries, fitness level and time commitments. The key takeaways: Use a training plan as a guide, but plan to be flexible. You can still finish your goal event even if you don’t follow the plan to a T; just try to follow the plan to the best of your ability.

To save you the headache of navigating the thousands of 5K and 10K training plans out there, we asked Olympian Jeff Galloway, whose highly lauded run/walk training plans have helped numerous beginners cross their first finish lines, to share his best 5K and 10K training plans.

Get Ready to Run Your First 5K in 15 Weeks
This training plan is optimal for beginners who are new to the sport of running, as it includes run-walk intervals. During the 15-week period, runners gradually build up their running time from 10–15 minutes in the first week to 30 minutes in the last week. Each week includes 1 day of rest, which is very important for recovery (no matter the distance), and 3 days for walking or cross-training, which keeps runners from burning out.

Galloway’s approach to training doesn’t focus solely on how many miles are logged, but more on the time spent completing each workout. The one exception comes every Sunday: Runners will get a taste of what it feels like to complete a specified distance. Each week, runners will build up their miles until they’ve reached a comfortable 4-mile distance, the week before the 5K.

Get Ready to Run Your First 10K in 13 Weeks
For those who may have already run their first 5K and want to tackle the next challenge, or for those beginners who can run 20 consecutive minutes, Galloway’s 13-week 10K training plan prepares runners for the 6.2-mile distance. This training plan follows the same theme as the 5K plan, focusing on time spent running rather than miles most days, with 3 days for cross-training or walking, 1 rest day and 1 day that focuses on completing a prescribed distance.

During the span of 13 weeks, runners will build from 2 miles to 7 miles, peaking 3 weeks before race day. As the runs get longer each week, Galloway strongly suggests giving your blood sugar a boost by eating an energy bar about an hour before exercise. He also advises runners to drink plenty of fluids when thirsty.

Training plans offered, with permission, from Olympian Jeff Galloway.

Tracking your runs doesn’t have to be a difficult task. Download the MapMyRun or UA Record app and, after your workouts, you can view your training log, which displays the distance of your run, the duration and more. Simply put, the app takes the guesswork out of tracking.

From Couch to 10K In 12 Weeks

The Couch to 10K training program uses the walk/run method which is very popular among beginner runners.

A method designed to train you from zero fitness to 10K within 12 weeks.

As the name would suggest, this program is a little more ambitious than the conventional Couch to 5K, but that doesn’t mean to say you won’t complete it – even if you have done little or no running since school, you will still reach the 10K finish line if you follow the program week by week
So whether you are planning to run a 10K event or just want to start running and give yourself a challenge… this page is for you 😉

10K Training Preparation

The walk/run method lets your body learn how to adapt to running gradually, allowing your muscles to recover which will help avoid injury. This method uses intervals of walking as well as running, building your confidence and steadily building stamina and fitness
10K may seem like a lofty target if you are a beginner or out of shape, but take it week by week and follow the running tips below and you’ll give yourself a good chance of completing your target
how good will that feel…

Couch To 10K – Running Tips

  • Only start the Couch to 10K if you can walk comfortably for 60 minutes – if not, build up your walking and then start the program
  • Do you want a time-target instead of running a 10K? Then make your target to run 60 minutes (non-stop) instead of 10K
  • If the Couch to 10K training program advances too quickly for your liking then repeat a week – this is much better than missing a week! Or, if you are training toward a 10K event and can’t afford to miss a week, do 50% or 75% of the running intervals and increase the walking times. Then catch up the week after 😉

  • Push yourself and don’t give up without a fight! Running is hard at first (it’s normal!), expect some huffing and puffing, but keep pushing – not so hard that you feel dizzy or ready to pass out, just go beyond your “normal limits”
  • Improve your diet – even as a beginner runner what you eat can be the difference between completing your daily goal and failing it. So, if you think your runners diet might need a tweak here and there, now is a good time
  • Promise yourself a treat – many runners find it helps their motivation if they treat themselves after a target is reached. After you reach your 10K goal why not treat yourself to a new piece of new running gear? Or treat yourself to a day out with the family – you choose, but make it something special

Couch To 10K – Training Program

The Couch to 10K (below) is a 3 day a week training program and, like the Couch to 5K program, I have designed it so that the third run of each week is the longest and the second run is (usually) the shortest; I have also included 2 “easy” weeks
You might want to set your long run for the weekend while doing the first two workouts during the week?

But feel free to swap them around as you wish, just avoid running on consecutive days, this will allow your muscles to recover properly after each run 😉

Running Tips HQ:

On non-running days consider cycling or swimming as part of your cross training – but remember to have one day of complete rest every week

Start and finish each workout with a 5 minute walk. This warms up your muscles before a run and allows those tired muscles to recover after a run – good for injury prevention 😉

Note: On Day 1 repeat the Run and Walk intervals 8 times (x8) and on Day 2 repeat 6 times (x6) and so on… just checking 🙂

Here goes…

Looking for a printable version?

Once you get through the first 3 or 4 weeks of the training program you’ll start to see significant improvements in your fitness, especially if you are starting from scratch and unused to exercise. Whatever happens though, don’t flop over after only a week or two – give it a chance, and stay positive

“Hang on… what do I do after I’ve done the Couch to 10K?”

Good question!

You have a couple of options here…

  • If you want to maintain your “10K fitness” -rather than go out there and run 10K every time you go for a run, stick with 2 or 3 runs around the 3 or 4 mile mark and have one long run per week (this could be your 10K)

  • Another way to look at this is to think, “well I’ll do a few 10Ks and then try to run further on my long run,” this is great! Try 1/2 a mile a week increase and see how it goes – this will make your running more progressive and challenging…great for motivation!

Remember (especially as a beginner) only run 4 or 5 times a week while you get used to running and ALWAYS have one complete rest day, including cross training or weights etc. Your body likes to rest 😉

Any problems, visit our Running For Beginners page – you will find helpful tips and advice to give you further encouragement, advice and hints 😉

Failing that, drop us a line 🙂
Ready to start your Couch to 10K?

Cool.

Mental Training software to improve your running?
For an extra training tool, consider using the power of brainwave entrainment to get your running started. This is a proven technique similar to the techniques used by sports hypnotherapists to improve athletic performance. This stuff is great for beginner runners as well as experienced athletes! (… more)

Top 10 beginner running tips – this is a really helpful list to have handy when you are learning how to start running, have a quick look here

For extra motivation find out about the health benefits of running. An in depth look at why your running helps you live longer!

5K/10K Training Schedules

  • Don’t wait to take walk breaks. By alternating walking and running from the beginning, you speed recovery without losing any of the endurance effect of the long one.
  • Be sure to do the running portion slow enough at the beginning of every run (especially the long run) so that you’ll feel tired but strong at the end. The conservatism will allow you to recover faster.
  • Every other day you can cross-train instead of walking. Cross country ski machines, water running, cycling, and any other other mode which you find fun and interesting (but non-pounding) will improve overall fitness.
  • Stay conversational on all of your exercise sessions. This means that you should be exerting yourself at a low enough level that you could talk. It’s okay to take deep breaths between sentences, but you don’t want to “huff and puff” between every word.
  • As the runs get longer, be sure to keep your blood sugar boosted by eating an energy bar (or equivalent) about an hour before exercise.
5k Training Schedule
Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 walk or XT (cross training) run 10-15 min walk or XT run 10-15 min walk or XT off 1 mile
2 walk or XT run 15 min walk or XT run 15 min walk or XT off 1 mile
3 walk or XT run 15-20 min walk or XT run 15-20 min walk or XT off 1.5 mile
4 walk or XT run 15-20 min walk or XT run 15-20 min walk or XT off 1.5 mile
5 walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT off 2 miles
6 walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT off 2 miles
7 walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT off 2.5 miles
8 walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT off 2.5 miles
9 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 3 miles
10 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 3 miles
11 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 3.5 miles
12 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 3.5 miles
13 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 4 miles
14 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 4 miles
15 walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT run 30 min walk or XT off 5K Race

10k Training Schedule
Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT off 2 miles
2 walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT off 2 miles
3 walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT off 3 miles
4 walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT off 4 miles
5 walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT off 4 miles or 5K
6 walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT off 5 miles
7 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 5 miles or 5K
8 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 6 miles
9 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 6 miles or 5K
10 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 7 miles
11 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 3.5 miles
12 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 4 miles or 5K
13 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 10K Race
Easy or recovery runs

During an easy run you should feel relaxed. You should be breathing comfortably and be capable of holding a conversation throughout the run. If you’re a new/novice runner then you’ll probably be questioning whether any runs feel easy and holding a conversation may feel impossible. Slow down, walk if necessary and control your effort.

These are the bread and butter of your training, the ‘miles in the bank’. Steady runs build the aerobic base that acts as the foundation for the rest of your training. Conversations are still possible at this pace but in sentences rather than long gossip.

Tempo Runs

Tempo runs (sometimes called threshold runs) are runs where after a 10-15 minute warm up you run at a sustained pace for anything from 20 min up to an hour with a 10-15 min slower jog at the end. You are running hard, possibly just below your normal 10k pace, but not flat out. And the distance and effort should be such that you do not finish feeling exhausted. As with interval runs, it is such an individual area, to recommend individually.

Fartlek

Fartlek means “speed play” in Swedish. Fartlek runs are when you mix periods of fast running with periods of slower running. They are a less structured form of interval training because the fast and slow parts are not predefined.

Pace Runs

Pace runs are training runs, run at approximately your estimated race pace. That is if you are aiming for a 3 hour 30 marathon averaging approx 8 min miles.(5 min km) then your pace runs are run at 8 min miles. They help build pace judgement and even paced running. The long training run is there to build endurance, not speed, and running your long run at a faster pace than you are ready for could lead to you taking longer to recover each week and upset the steady gradual improvement all schedules are designed to bring.

Repetition/Interval training (8×800)

Repetition or interval training are a feature of schedules where you are really committed to improving and bringing the best out of yourself whatever your standard. You do not have to be an elite or even good club standard runner to run the advanced schedules. Rather you have probably a background of a few years of training fairly hard at any distance from 10k up to marathon and understand how faster paced running or running “out of your comfort zone” once a week has helped you improve.

Interval or repetition running, are efforts run at faster than your planned marathon race pace. Impossible to give more than general guidance as it is such an individual area and depends a lot on where you are starting from and what your goal is and is usually best done under guidance from a group environment or a coach or experienced personal trainer. 4x 800 is one example which can build to 8x 800 as the schedule progresses. You run the 800 metres or whatever the chosen distance is at the faster pace. Then walk or jog 400metres very easily before repeating the faster distance again etc. For marathon training long intervals of at least 800m or longer (1000m or even a mile) are acknowledged to be most beneficial.

Hill Repeats

These are a variation on repetitions on the flat. They are a great variation with a similar benefit of building leg strength. Find an incline of approx 4-600 metres or one that will take about 2 minutes. Run hard up the hill and slightly over the crest, turn around and jog slowly down the hill before repeating the run up again etc

10k beginner training plan

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