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Olympic Champion Sanya Richards-Ross Goes for the Glam & Gold of Reality TV

Sanya Richards-Ross

She’s one of the fastest women in the world, but there will be no running from the cameras for Sanya Richards-Ross in her new reality series, Sanya’s Glam & Gold, which premieres Thursday (10/9c, WE). Turns out, the type-A personality that helped drive her to the Olympic title in the 400-meter dash last summer is not confined to the stadium. “The only time Sanya stays in her lane is on the track,” younger sister Shari laments in the first episode, annoyed by Sanya’s involvement in the Austin hair salon Sanya funded for her.

Richard-Ross’s ambition often exasperates her family (dubbed “Team S.R.R.”), who are all prominently featured in the six-episode series. In the premiere, they chastise her for her inability to relax, even on a vacation in Jamaica. “I really push them hard to be the best they can be,” the three-time Olympian says of her family’s role in her career and business ventures. “I’m happy for the world to see a side of me they don’t know.”

Not that it will always be pretty. “I’m not very patient, and people are gonna see that,” admits Richards-Ross, who battled a slow recovery from post-Olympic toe surgery during filming and has had a disappointing season, finishing only sixth in the 400 at June’s USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships. (Richards-Ross had previously won six national titles at the meet since 2003.)

The show also features Richards Ross and husband Aaron Ross — an NFL cornerback for the New York Giants — debating when to have children (he’s ready now; she wants to wait until after the 2016 Olympics) and struggling with busy schedules that frequently keep them apart. “I think it’s something a lot of working women can relate to: when is the right time to slow down to have a child,” Richards-Ross says.

After the first week of filming, Richards-Ross admits that she lowered her inhibitions in front of the camera crew, leading to honest and raw conversations. “My family says this experience is almost like therapy for us,” she says. “We were really able to sort through some issues. Yes, there are some moments where I wish I didn’t say some things, and some things came out a little harsher than I thought. But that’s our family; that’s how we talk to each other. We have fun.”

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Aaron Ross & Sanya Richards-Ross: The Gold & Glam Of Married Love Keeps Them Happy

When you have two highly competitive individuals in one room, on one field or one court…the level of intensity and the thirst for winning at any cost usually comes into play rather quickly!

What happens when 2-time NY Giants Superbowl champ Aaron Ross test his skills against 4-time Olympic Gold medalist Sanya Richards-Ross? You have a super power Black couple as teammates in business and life as each other’s support system ready to take on the world. I recently had the great opportunity to chat with Aaron & Sanya about their reality show on the WEtv network titled “Sanya’s Glam & Gold” and how they both use their natural competitive and athletic instincts to survive in the business world and life in general as husband and wife.

How did you two both originally meet?

Aaron: Ladies go first, so I’ll let Sanya tell you (laughs).

Sanya: Well, we met on campus at the University of Texas and we were both freshman. He stepped into the cafeteria and I was like “dang! Alright, he’s fine” (laughs). We introduced ourselves, started talking then began dating shortly after that.

Both of you achieved and accomplished many feats throughout your amazing college and respective professional careers. Who do you feel is more competitive?

Aaron: I think I am.

Sanya: No, I think I am (laughs). I think I’m more competitive with everything. I think Aaron can turn his off and on, but I think I’m more competitive.

Aaron: Nah…I beg to differ. I think I’m a quiet competitor, while Sanya’s more of a vocal competitor.

Sanya: So I win! (Both laughs).

Aaron: I think we compete in just about everything, since both of us are very competitive. We have no choice but to be that way, especially being professional athletes. We have a lot of fun competing with one another.

When you look at all the other “reality” shows, what do you feel makes your show different?

Sanya: What I feel makes our show different is my family being Jamaican. Being born & raised in Jamaica gives the viewers a little taste of our Jamaican attitudes, the accent and what it’s like being raised a Jamaican. Hopefully, you’ll get to see more of that in season 2. I also think we try to have a positive outlook on life, what I think Aaron and I do anyway but it’s a real positive show. You get to see young black love and our hard work and dedication applied in everything we do. Aaron and I are both go getters, so hopefully the show is a form of inspiration as well. Of course, you have your situations and drama too. The transition of exposing our personal lives to the public wasn’t as difficult as we thought it might’ve been. We had a really great crew and they really made us feel comfortable to be ourselves, so it wasn’t that hard. We’ve gotten a really great response, so hopefully we can get season 2 started and work on some more episodes.

Read the engaging interview here.

Watch all of episode 1 below:

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By Lauren Porter · May 31, 2018

When Sanya Richards-Ross and her husband Aaron Ross found out they were expecting, they were both excited to become first-time parents and bring a little one into the world.

When the couple found out they were having a baby boy, the four-time Olympic Gold medalist admits she was even happier because her son would have the two-time Super Bowl-winning champ as an example of what a good man can be.

With their 9-month-old son, Aaron “Deucey” Ross II enjoying some pre-summer fun with dad, the retired Jamaican-American track star took to Instagram to share her sentiments about their sweet father-son bond.

I know these moments leave impressions that last a lifetime… Thanks @rossboy31 for being such a great example for our baby boy!!! #DaddyAndDeucey

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on May 31, 2018 at 7:07am PDT

“I know these moments leave impressions that last a lifetime… Thanks @rossboy31 for being such a great example for our baby boy!!! #DaddyAndDeucey,” she wrote.

The athletes shared that their family would grow by one on Valentine’s Day 2017 and welcomed Deucey in August of last year.

Since giving birth, the 33-year-old’s mommy and me moments with her son have stolen our hearts but the elder Ross and his namesake are just as cute.

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Apr 12, 2018 at 8:47am PDT

Let’s go horns, me and Deucey ready over here 🤘🏿🤘🏿. Oh yeah, it’s 1:00pm and OU still SUCKS. #longhorns #redriverrivalry

A post shared by Aaron Ross (@rossboy31) on Oct 14, 2017 at 11:03am PDT

How cute are my guys giving the award to @courtneyokolo yesterday!?! Thanks for the pics E! #ErrolAnderson @usatf #400mChamp

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Feb 19, 2018 at 4:43am PST

Every time I leave my Deucey Doo with Daddy he puts him in a matching beanie 🤦🏾‍♀️🤷🏾‍♀️😂#MyFaves #DeuceyDoo #MCE

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Jan 16, 2018 at 4:13pm PST

#MCM a perfect ending to a perfect first Christmas. #FatherAndSon #DeuceysFirstChristmas

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Dec 25, 2017 at 8:04pm PST

We just love the Ross family’s feel-good vibes. Cute overload!

Share : TOPICS: Black Celeb Couples Celebrity Moms Love & Sex Black Love

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Olympic Gold Medalist and UT Longhorn track star Sanya Richards-Ross retired last year, and now she and her husband Aaron Ross, a former New York Giant and UT Longhorn football player, have embarked on a new challenge: parenthood.

Richards-Ross is due in August with their first child — a son. She spoke with Austin American-Statesman reporter Nicole Villalpando about the joys and challenges upcoming for their family.

RELATED: The Longhorns’ first couple of athletics is expanding the family

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Parenthood and retirement from sports is changing where they are in their life and what goals they have for the future. This weekend, the Rosses are partnering with Capital One Bank to be spokespeople for Capital One’s Banking Reimagined Tour. A 54-foot trailer will be at The Domain from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

The Rosses, who now live in Round Rock, will be there Saturday afternoon to set their own financial future. “It meets you where you are,” she says. “It takes away the anxiety. It puts your life goals first and then helps you to figure out how to get there financially.”

News on Bevo Beat is free and unlimited. Access to the rest of Hookem.com is included with an Austin American-Statesman subscription in addition to Statesman.com and the ePaper edition. Subscribe today at statesman.com/subscribe.

Olympic Gold Medalist Sanya Richards-Ross and NFL Star Aaron Ross Welcome First Child

Four-time Olympic gold medalist Sanya Richards-Ross and her husband, two-time Super Bowl champ Aaron Ross, welcomed their first child — a son named Aaron Jermaine Ross II — on Sunday.

The new mom took to Instagram hours after giving birth to announce the exciting news, sharing a super sweet snapshot of her newborn son’s hand gripping her finger.

“8/12/17…. my prince has arrived!!!! There is no greater love,” Sanya captioned the pic.

8/12/17…. my prince has arrived!!!! There is no greater love ❤️ #AJRII #FirstTimeMommy #MyLove

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Aug 12, 2017 at 1:54pm PDT

PHOTOS: Oh, Baby! Celeb Birth Announcements

During her pregnancy, Sanya shared a number of photos documenting her growing baby bump and celebrating the exciting addition to their family.

#SRRBellyUpdate…. some days I’m not sure how much bigger my belly can get and other days I marvel at the miracle that is pregnancy! #AlmostThere #FirstTimeMommy #34weekspregnant #ChasingGrace

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Jul 12, 2017 at 5:48pm PDT

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Jun 30, 2017 at 11:20am PDT

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Jun 15, 2017 at 11:49am PDT

A post shared by Sanya Richards-Ross (@sanyarichiross) on Jun 15, 2017 at 8:52am PDT

Sanya and Aaron began dating in 2003 when they were both students at the University of Texas at Austin, where he was playing for the Longhorns. The pair got engaged in 2007, and ended up tying the knot in 2010.

PHOTOS: Celebs Share Pics of Their Cute Kids

In June, after announcing that she and her husband were expecting, Ross released her memoir, Chasing Grace: What The Quarter Mile Has Taught Me About God and Life.

The book made headlines for one particular story in which the track-and-field star revealed that she had an abortion shortly before flying to the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where she went on to win gold in the 4 × 400 meter relay.

“The culmination of a lifetime of work was right before me,” the 32-year-old athlete wrote. “In that moment, it seemed like no choice at all.”

The star athlete also shared how the decision temporarily drove a wedge between her and her then-fiance, but they managed to overcome their issues. Sanya said that she spoke out about her decision in an attempt to reach out to other young women, “especially female athletes,” who would benefit from learning of her experiences.

ABOUT COOKIES

Aug 18, 2015

  • Nicole Blades

There are some athletes who get your immediate respect because of the sheer depth of their talent and skill. Then there are others, like Olympic medalist and track and field star Sanya Richards-Ross, who gain admiration by being undeniably gifted, exceedingly gracious and sweet as all get out. Her positivity and poise leave her looking like a winner, no matter how things might go on the track.

But, uh, the record will show that the woman is a powerhouse, so nabbing the gold is also totally her thing. She won the 400-meter sprint at the 2012 Olympics in London and took gold in the 4×400-meter relay at the 2012, 2008 and 2004 Games, while also ranking No. 1 in the world in the 400 meters for much of the past decade. And although she failed to qualify for the 400-meter final at U.S. nationals last month, her focus is locked on Rio for next summer.

Richards-Ross, 30, took time out from training to make her fourth Olympics to chat with espnW about recovering from setbacks, the benefits of sun salutations, and how she finds balance between going hard and putting a priority on rest. Richards-Ross, originally from Jamaica, also got a chance to let her West Indian flag fly proudly, talking about her favorite rum-and-raisin ice cream.

espnW: What does your typical workout consist of?

Sanya Richards-Ross: It depends on the time of year. For fall, my workouts are very different than right before a competition. In the fall I go for longer runs — for a sprinter, 30 minutes is a long time! I also do a lot of functional training, where I do body weight training and circuit. I also do a lot of Pilates all year round. As the season progresses, I get back on the track and my workouts are very 400-meter specific; so repeat 200s, 300s and 500s that help to get my speed and my strength toned up. Before competition, I also get very aggressive in the weight room. I do more Olympic lifts, snatches, box jumps, cleans — more dynamic movements.

espnW: Could you walk me through one of your dynamic moves in the weight room?

SR-R: The power clean. I lift 130 to 140 pounds, and start bent over with the bar at the floor. Then I pull the bar up, and have that really quick, explosive move — I literally leave the floor with a jump — where you get the bar up and catch it on your shoulders and rest in a front squat position.

It’s one of the more full-body exercises you can do. Sprinters do power cleans for explosiveness. Moving the bar that quickly is reminiscent of getting off the blocks. It’s moving weight quickly. It’s also excellent for full body because you’re squatting, it’s full extension — from the ankle, knee, hip — and also upper body because you have to pick the bar up, which incorporates the shoulders and back.

If you’re not an athlete, the key to this exercise is using moderate weight. If you go too heavy, you could really hurt yourself. But even with moderate weight, once you master the technique, it’s an excellent exercise to tone up all of your muscle groups.

espnW: In the offseason, how do you change up the routine?

SR-R: That’s when I do more functional work and circuit training, like arm drives, push-ups. It’s the nitty-gritty, hard stuff because I’m doing a lot of reps, like up to 100 reps of squats, with no weight.

espnW: Do you have a fuel regimen that you swear by?

SR-R: I drink a lot of water. I also incorporate protein shakes every day. After my tough runs or tough lifts, I try to get a protein shake or some nuts within 30 minutes of my workouts. I also have a pretty clean diet. I don’t eat red meat.

espnW: When you’re training, what does your average day’s menu look like?

SR-R: The first thing I do when I wake up is drink a 16-ounce bottle of water. Then I’ll have breakfast: either egg whites or oatmeal and fruits. For lunch I’ll usually have a grilled chicken salad, grilled chicken sandwich or tuna sandwich. But I’m not really big on carbs. I don’t like to have a lot of bread; it weighs me down a little bit. Over time I’ve noticed that if I eat too much bread I don’t feel as good during my workouts.

I also juice a lot of my fruits and vegetables. My dad really helps me with that. I’ll usually have my first juice of the day at lunchtime.

One of my favorite juice recipes is called Popeye’s Power: half an apple, a handful of spinach, four carrots, one organic celery stalk, half of a beet, and a handful of parsley. It’s by far my favorite juice mix. It gives you with energy and fuels you up.

Post-workout, I’ll have another protein shake. And then for dinner I’ll have grilled salmon or chicken with grilled vegetables and some rice. I’m a simple eater, and I don’t usually go outside my diet. I eat to live; I don’t live to eat.

espnW: Is there something that’s outside of your usual diet — a treat — that you like to have?

SR-R: Yes! I eat clean all week and then on Saturday or Sunday I’ll have pizza or ice cream. But I keep it in moderation.

I just love pizza. If I weren’t an athlete, I would eat pizza two to three times a week. I like thin-crust, New York-style, nothing fancy — from some hole in the wall place — just cheap, cheese falling off, scorching hot and greasy. I also like rum-and-raisin ice cream.

espnW: Your Caribbean-ness is showing! My family is from Barbados and my folks love rum-and-raisin ice cream, too! Classic Caribbean.

SR-R: Yes, yes! Most people pause whenever I say I like rum-and-raisin, and I’m like, “You wouldn’t understand.” (laughs)

espnW: Do you have a favorite recipe — maybe one while training and another when it’s chill time? And, do you stick to the same nutrition plan whether you’re training or not?

SR-R: Yes, it’s tilapia or salmon that we grill in the oven, seasoned with garlic powder and a little salt and pepper, throw it in the oven for about 20 minutes with steamed rice (brown or white), and boiled broccoli.

espnW: Who handles most of the cooking at home?

SR-R: About two or three years ago, my husband became the chef of the house and I love it! I’m also lucky because my parents live really close to us, and my mother is an excellent cook. My dad is, too. It’s nice that we can share those duties between the four of us and always have a healthy, home-cooked meal. We don’t really order in much. Usually six nights out of the week we’ll cook at home.

espnW: Are there any traditional Jamaican dishes that you like to have and look forward to as a special treat?

SR-R: There are quite a few! My mom makes a mean curry chicken and a great brown stew chicken. My sister also lives close — about 30 minutes away — and she’ll drive down for this: a traditional Jamaican breakfast, with ackee and salt fish and fried dumpling and boiled banana. My mom doesn’t make it that often, but it’s definitely a treat that we all really enjoy.

espnW: Taking about another kind of fuel: motivation. The recent U.S. 400-meter final didn’t go the way you wanted, but almost right away, you took to Instagram talking about looking forward; plus this IG post/tweet two days after the setback. That is what draws people to you and leaves them feeling inspired. Where do you draw your inspiration? How do you move through the setbacks?

SR-R: It’s not easy, but I believe that light that I try to shine really comes from my faith. (I’m getting a bit emotional now…) After that race, I was so broken and disappointed. I really saw 2015 going differently for me. But I know I have so many young people who look up to me, and I think they especially watch you in those moments when things don’t go your way. And that’s when you have a real opportunity to make a greater impression, especially on a young person.

Too many times in life the narrative is, “If you don’t win, you’re a loser.” I don’t believe that. I don’t believe that every race must be won in order for you to feel like you’ve accomplished something great.

espnW: At 30, do you find yourself treating your body differently?

SR-R: After nationals, did a deep dive into what went wrong. I train hard, and have been running faster than when I was at 19 and 20 years old, so why wasn’t I performing better? It forced us to say, “At 30, maybe training harder isn’t the answer.”

I did a lot of research into overtraining. I’ve been running for over 20 years, and I’m now learning about focusing on rest and recovery; really listening to my body and maybe dialing back on the training, so I can have fresher legs. It’s a challenge, because I like to put in 110 percent every time.

espnW: How do you deal with injury? Is there a specific part of your training that focuses on prevention and rehab?

SR-R: I definitely focus on prevention. This is something I just started: I incorporate a full stretch routine in the mornings. I’ll do a few yoga sun salutations for about 15 or 20 minutes. That’s been helping a lot. I also get frequent massages. I have a physiotherapist that I travel with. During the offseason, I try to get one to two massages a week, plus tons of ice baths and Epsom salt baths.

espnW: If you had to boil it down to three key tips for maintaining your health and athletic edge, what would they be?

SR-R: First is finding and maintaining balance between work and my personal life. It’s about not overdoing one or the other. Second, being spiritually connected makes me feel like the best version of myself. So whatever that looks like to you–for me, that’s reading the Bible and going to church — it’s about feeding your soul. The third tip is keeping it fun and light. Sometimes I make things bigger than they are. Whenever I remember that it’s just a race and I need to go out and have fun, that’s when I compete at my best. So have fun and enjoy the moment.

espnW: When you’re not pouring it all into your training, what do you do for self-care?

SRR: I love soaking in the bath for 30 to 45 minutes and reading a book or journaling, which I’ve always done throughout my career. And I love spending time with my husband–he’s the best! So we’ll watch a movie or hang out together. I also really like to engage with people, so I’ll connect with people on Twitter. Those kinds of things make me happy.

From first-time yogis to veteran triathletes, each body in motion is a successful one. We created the My Body Can movement to celebrate that notion, and now we want to hear from you. Tag a photo or video with #MyBodyCan, and share with the espnW community what amazing things can your body do!

— — There are some athletes who get your immediate respect because of the sheer depth of their talent and skill. Then there are others, like Olympic medalist and track and field star Sanya Richards-Ross, who gain admiration by being undeniably gifted, exceedingly gracious and sweet as all get out. Her positivity and poise leave her looking like a winner, no matter how things might go on the track.

But, uh, the record will show that the woman is a powerhouse, so nabbing the gold is also totally her thing. She won the 400-meter sprint at the 2012 Olympics in London and took gold in the 4×400-meter relay at the 2012, 2008 and 2004 Games, while also ranking No. 1 in the world in the 400 meters for much of the past decade. And although she failed to qualify for the 400-meter final at U.S. nationals last month, her focus is locked on Rio for next summer.

Richards-Ross, 30, took time out from training to make her fourth Olympics to chat with espnW about recovering from setbacks, the benefits of sun salutations, and how she finds balance between going hard and putting a priority on rest. Richards-Ross, originally from Jamaica, also got a chance to let her West Indian flag fly proudly, talking about her favorite rum-and-raisin ice cream.

Sanya Richards-Ross: It depends on the time of year. For fall, my workouts are very different than right before a competition. In the fall I go for longer runs — for a sprinter, 30 minutes is a long time! I also do a lot of functional training, where I do body weight training and circuit. I also do a lot of Pilates all year round. As the season progresses, I get back on the track and my workouts are very 400-meter specific; so repeat 200s, 300s and 500s that help to get my speed and my strength toned up. Before competition, I also get very aggressive in the weight room. I do more Olympic lifts, snatches, box jumps, cleans — more dynamic movements.

SR-R: The power clean. I lift 130 to 140 pounds, and start bent over with the bar at the floor. Then I pull the bar up, and have that really quick, explosive move — I literally leave the floor with a jump — where you get the bar up and catch it on your shoulders and rest in a front squat position.

It’s one of the more full-body exercises you can do. Sprinters do power cleans for explosiveness. Moving the bar that quickly is reminiscent of getting off the blocks. It’s moving weight quickly. It’s also excellent for full body because you’re squatting, it’s full extension — from the ankle, knee, hip — and also upper body because you have to pick the bar up, which incorporates the shoulders and back.

If you’re not an athlete, the key to this exercise is using moderate weight. If you go too heavy, you could really hurt yourself. But even with moderate weight, once you master the technique, it’s an excellent exercise to tone up all of your muscle groups.

SR-R: That’s when I do more functional work and circuit training, like arm drives, push-ups. It’s the nitty-gritty, hard stuff because I’m doing a lot of reps, like up to 100 reps of squats, with no weight.

SR-R: I drink a lot of water. I also incorporate protein shakes every day. After my tough runs or tough lifts, I try to get a protein shake or some nuts within 30 minutes of my workouts. I also have a pretty clean diet. I don’t eat red meat.

SR-R: The first thing I do when I wake up is drink a 16-ounce bottle of water. Then I’ll have breakfast: either egg whites or oatmeal and fruits. For lunch I’ll usually have a grilled chicken salad, grilled chicken sandwich or tuna sandwich. But I’m not really big on carbs. I don’t like to have a lot of bread; it weighs me down a little bit. Over time I’ve noticed that if I eat too much bread I don’t feel as good during my workouts.

I also juice a lot of my fruits and vegetables. My dad really helps me with that. I’ll usually have my first juice of the day at lunchtime.

One of my favorite juice recipes is called Popeye’s Power: half an apple, a handful of spinach, four carrots, one organic celery stalk, half of a beet, and a handful of parsley. It’s by far my favorite juice mix. It gives you with energy and fuels you up.

Post-workout, I’ll have another protein shake. And then for dinner I’ll have grilled salmon or chicken with grilled vegetables and some rice. I’m a simple eater, and I don’t usually go outside my diet. I eat to live; I don’t live to eat.

SR-R: Yes! I eat clean all week and then on Saturday or Sunday I’ll have pizza or ice cream. But I keep it in moderation.

I just love pizza. If I weren’t an athlete, I would eat pizza two to three times a week. I like thin-crust, New York-style, nothing fancy — from some hole in the wall place — just cheap, cheese falling off, scorching hot and greasy. I also like rum-and-raisin ice cream.

SR-R: Yes, yes! Most people pause whenever I say I like rum-and-raisin, and I’m like, “You wouldn’t understand.” (laughs)

SR-R: Yes, it’s tilapia or salmon that we grill in the oven, seasoned with garlic powder and a little salt and pepper, throw it in the oven for about 20 minutes with steamed rice (brown or white), and boiled broccoli.

SR-R: About two or three years ago, my husband became the chef of the house and I love it! I’m also lucky because my parents live really close to us, and my mother is an excellent cook. My dad is, too. It’s nice that we can share those duties between the four of us and always have a healthy, home-cooked meal. We don’t really order in much. Usually six nights out of the week we’ll cook at home.

SR-R: There are quite a few! My mom makes a mean curry chicken and a great brown stew chicken. My sister also lives close — about 30 minutes away — and she’ll drive down for this: a traditional Jamaican breakfast, with ackee and salt fish and fried dumpling and boiled banana. My mom doesn’t make it that often, but it’s definitely a treat that we all really enjoy.

SR-R: It’s not easy, but I believe that light that I try to shine really comes from my faith. (I’m getting a bit emotional now…) After that race, I was so broken and disappointed. I really saw 2015 going differently for me. But I know I have so many young people who look up to me, and I think they especially watch you in those moments when things don’t go your way. And that’s when you have a real opportunity to make a greater impression, especially on a young person.

Too many times in life the narrative is, “If you don’t win, you’re a loser.” I don’t believe that. I don’t believe that every race must be won in order for you to feel like you’ve accomplished something great.

SR-R: After nationals, did a deep dive into what went wrong. I train hard, and have been running faster than when I was at 19 and 20 years old, so why wasn’t I performing better? It forced us to say, “At 30, maybe training harder isn’t the answer.”

I did a lot of research into overtraining. I’ve been running for over 20 years, and I’m now learning about focusing on rest and recovery; really listening to my body and maybe dialing back on the training, so I can have fresher legs. It’s a challenge, because I like to put in 110 percent every time.

SR-R: I definitely focus on prevention. This is something I just started: I incorporate a full stretch routine in the mornings. I’ll do a few yoga sun salutations for about 15 or 20 minutes. That’s been helping a lot. I also get frequent massages. I have a physiotherapist that I travel with. During the offseason, I try to get one to two massages a week, plus tons of ice baths and Epsom salt baths.

SR-R: First is finding and maintaining balance between work and my personal life. It’s about not overdoing one or the other. Second, being spiritually connected makes me feel like the best version of myself. So whatever that looks like to you–for me, that’s reading the Bible and going to church — it’s about feeding your soul. The third tip is keeping it fun and light. Sometimes I make things bigger than they are. Whenever I remember that it’s just a race and I need to go out and have fun, that’s when I compete at my best. So have fun and enjoy the moment.

SRR: I love soaking in the bath for 30 to 45 minutes and reading a book or journaling, which I’ve always done throughout my career. And I love spending time with my husband–he’s the best! So we’ll watch a movie or hang out together. I also really like to engage with people, so I’ll connect with people on Twitter. Those kinds of things make me happy.

From first-time yogis to veteran triathletes, each body in motion is a successful one. We created the My Body Can movement to celebrate that notion, and now we want to hear from you. Tag a photo or video with #MyBodyCan, and share with the espnW community what amazing things can your body do!

Work, rest and play – Sanya Richards-Ross

World indoor 400m champion Sanya Richards-Ross is known as one of the most glamorous athletes in the world of athletics. We found out more about how the US Olympic 400m champion spends her work, rest and play time.

SANYA AT WORK

What are your three favourite things about being an athlete?

Sanya Richards-Ross: Number one would be winning. Nothing compares with the feeling I had at the London Olympics of knowing all the hard work I put in paid off. Secondly, I would say being able to travel the world. As international athletes that is a real luxury. Thirdly, I love competing and what I love about athletics is that uniqueness of competing against my rivals (in individual competition) but then also the camaraderie of coming together as a team for the relays.

Do you have a favourite training session?

SRR: My Monday sessions are 200m repeats – anywhere between eight and 12 – and I know if I run them like clockwork, I’m ready to run really fast. For me, it is the perfect blend between speed and endurance. I love it because I’m a sprinter at heart.

What is your least favourite training session?

SRR: Every Tuesday we do over-distance work – 2x1000m – and I dread these workouts. Any workout I run over 400m seems like I’m running a marathon. We usually get two minutes rest and the second 1000m is all about heart and guts. As you can tell, my favourite training day is a Monday and my least favourite a Tuesday.

What is your favourite music to train to?

SRR: My workout music changes depending on my mood. If I want a pick-me-up, I’ll listen to some hardcore rap music. There are also times when I really like listening to gospel and the likes of Yolanda Adams and Kirk Franklin for inspiration. Of course, because of my Jamaican roots I also like listening to the reggae of Bob Marley and Mavado.

What is the best piece of coaching advice you’ve ever received?

SRR: Clyde Hart has been my coach for the past eight or nine years and I remember beating Tonique Williams (the 2004 Olympic 400m champion) in Lausanne ahead of the 2005 World Championships, thinking I would then beat her to win the gold at the World Championships. I didn’t win (Williams did) and I was devastated. My coach said you can pout now, but there is still so much work to be done. My coach didn’t allow me to live in that moment too long.

SANYA AT REST

What is your favourite way to relax?

SRR: With my family. My husband (Aaron Ross, an American footballer with the New York Giants) has a full schedule, so when we’re not competing I love to bring my family together, whether that is watching a movies or for a celebration or a birthday party.

What is your favourite stress reliever?

SRR: Shopping. I love fashion and beauty. To shop has always been a passion of mine and that relaxes me.

What is your favourite book?

SRR: Battlefield of the Mind by Joyce Meyer. I was reading the book in the lead up to the London Olympics, and the book helped me so much in keeping everything under control. It really helped with my success.

If you could pick an athlete to relax with, who would it be?

SRR: Can I choose two? I love David Rudisha. I’m so in awe of his poise and how competitive he is. So perhaps it would be less about relaxing but I would like to train with him. The other athlete is Blanka Vlasic. I always admire the way she dances and she (like me) also loves fashion and music.

What is your favourite drink to relax with?

SRR: I never had a drop of alcohol for 28 years, but I recently started drinking Moscato white wine. If I was at the beach or by a pool, that is what I would a drink. People have asked me why I started drinking alcohol and it happened one night I was out with some of the wives of the other New York Giants players. They asked me why I wouldn’t have a glass of wine and I thought, ‘you know what I’m almost 30, why not have one?’ I didn’t get drunk but it was a lot of fun.

SANYA AT PLAY

You are renowned for your stylish outfits and look on the athletics circuit. When did your passion for fashion begin?

SRR: Fashion has always been around me and my cousin is a stylist. When I was younger I thought people wouldn’t take me seriously if I looked too girly, but later at college I started to embrace fashion. It was then I thought that I don’t feel a need to be a tomboy. I was empowered by the fact the Williams sisters (tennis players Venus and Serena) were great athletes and beautiful women. From college I started to do my make-up, doing my hair and followed the latest fashion trends. I would like to think I’ve empowered other female athletes, that it is good to wear funky, cool outfits on the field of play.

Do you have an all-time favourite outfit?

SRR: That’s a tough question. I remember I was a freshman at college and I won the USATF outstanding youth award. I went to the Jesse Owens dinner and my mum got me an amazing white dress to wear. Even to this day people mention that white dress. I guess that one stands out because I got so many compliments.

What is the most expensive piece of clothing you’ve ever bought?

SRR: My husband bought me a $6000 Louis Vuitton fur coat two year ago. It is just heavenly.

What is your favourite label?

SRR: Chanel is my favourite and J Brand.

If you could design your own piece of track wear, what would it be?

SRR: Wearing sleeves are my thing, so if I could design my uniform it would have to have the sleeves in a one-piece unitard with tights. The back would be cut out to add some flair and maybe a strip of leather because that is the trend right now with some lace on it.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

Monday night the rooftop of the Gansevoort Hotel was home to the exclusive premiere of We TV’s “Sanya’s Gold & Glam,” an upcoming reality television series which chronicles the daily life of Olympic gold medalist Sanya Richards-Ross. Sanya recently won the gold medal in last year’s Olympics in the 4X400 relay as well as in the 400 individual relay. A launch party was thrown in celebration of the show and many notables were in attendance including Sanya herself, her husband Aaron, as well as other members of her family.

The Source Magazine was on hand to discuss all things “Glam and Gold” and during the festivities Sanya even commented that her family is like “the black Kardashians.” She explained that the comparison comes from how hectic her life can be as well as the sometimes tumultuous relationship she has with her sister, Shari. When asked about what aspect of the show she’s most excited about, you guessed it, she said her family. “It would be introducing my family to the world. They’ve been supportive of me for so long and they’ve kind of been the “wind beneath my wings” and now they get to come up front and so I’m excited to be able to give them a platform and for them to enjoy, I think it’ll be really great.”

She also commented on what the change was like from just living her life to having multiple cameras around her on a daily basis. “ For the first week it definitely was weird, when 25 people become a part of your world. But we’re a great cast, a great crew, easy to work with. After about a week you forget they’re there and just really let your hair down.”

Sanya isn’t the only superstar in her family however as her husband Aaron is currently a cornerback for the New York “Football” Giants. Aaron was selected 20th overall by “Big Blue” back in 2007, but left for a year to play with the Jacksonville Jaguars before finally returning to his beloved Giants just this year. Sanya shared what the hardest part is about being married to another pro-athlete. She explained, “The timing. I think that’s the hardest part is that we’re away from each other a lot because of our schedules, but we’ve learned how to balance that since I met Ross. The first summer meeting him I was gone for 2-3 months! So we learned really how to balance that and to make time for each other so it’s been great.”

And speaking of her husband, we also managed to get Sanya’s outlook on the upcoming NFL season and what the prospects for the Giants are. “I think it’s great! You know like Ross says “they’re very hungry,” and the Super Bowl is in New York! Like what bigger motivation could they have? So I’m hoping they’ll be there and I’m excited to watch and experience it again.”

The premiere of the episode went well and viewers can expect to have flashbacks of other reality shows such as the “T.O. Show.” “Glam & Gold” might not quite have the entertainment value as any of the Kardashians’ ventures but nonetheless it will allow for fans of Sanya to get an intimate look at her personal life and maybe have a few laughs along the way.

“Sanya’s Glam & Gold” premieres Thursday, July 25th at 10PM ET/PT.

-Jagpal Khahera (@jkhahera)

Olympian Sanya Richards-Ross talks about training and her reality show

Sanya Richards-Ross is a four-time track-and-field gold medalist for the United States. In the WEtv reality show “Sanya’s Glam & Gold,” her life training for the Olympics and living — and working — with her family was documented.

Richards-Ross, 28, talked to us about what it takes to stay in shape for the world’s highest-stakes sporting event, how she manages to work alongside her family and whether her workouts have changed over the years.

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Will you be competing in the next Olympics?

My goal is to compete in the next Olympics, yes. But I just had toe surgery, so I have been doing lots of rehab, and I’m not able to run like I usually do this time of year. I’ve been biking, swimming and doing yoga and Pilates to stay fit and healthy.

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What are your workouts like?

Our workouts are really intense. I do five days on the track, and earlier in the year I go for longer runs. For me, that’s about 30 minutes, progressively. I get back on the track, do 200 meters, then repeat with 400 meters. They are all done to get faster and stronger. I do a lot of weightlifting…. I also do a lot of core work: 500 to 1,000 sit-ups every day.

Because I am a sprinter, we don’t usually log our numbers in miles. I’m doing workouts to accentuate what my coach gives me: 1,500 meters, two miles of warmups, take breaks, everything with intervals. It probably comes down to about 2 miles of running every day.

Tell me about the reality show.

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My parents are my managers, my sister and I own a salon together in Austin and my husband, who is also an elite world-class athlete, will be on it. It’s an amazing show about what it’s like to work with your family and the struggle that comes with that. You will laugh with them, cry with them.

What’s your diet like?

I’m not very strict on diet. I’ve just always had a healthy diet. We don’t eat red meat, so I don’t eat a lot of fried food, and I honestly don’t eat to lose weight. I eat egg whites in the morning with fruit or bagels, salad for lunch or, if I’m training, a grilled chicken sandwich, then a shake with protein supplements and, for dinner, grilled chicken or salmon with potatoes or veggies. On Saturday or Sunday I will have pizza or French fries. I don’t think it’s healthy to deprive yourself of those treats. I just try to do everything in moderation.

Have your workouts changed at all over the years?

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My workouts are very tailored and specific to what I want to accomplish on the track, but otherwise they are the same. I’ve had the same coach for the past eight years. We work out according to what I might need, but for the most part my workouts stay consistent. Rest is also a crucial part of it. I need all my energy for my training.

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