Contents

Are You A Woman Who Has A Dark Line On Your Stomach? This Is Why

Pregnancy can drastically change a woman’s body. There are the obvious effects we all know about, like the overall weight gain, enlarged breasts, and, of course, the big, beautiful belly. But then there are the lesser-known outcomes that aren’t talked about quite as often, and they can be jarring to notice if you aren’t expecting them. For instance, if you’ve ever been surprised by a dark line on a woman’s stomach, and have wondered why it appears during pregnancy, we’ve got the answers.

You probably know which dark line we’re referring to — it goes down a woman’s pregnant stomach vertically, and looks darker than the rest of her skin. According to the American Pregnancy Association, this is called a “linea nigra,” with the unofficial name being “the pregnancy line.”

Interestingly enough, the linea nigra doesn’t develop once you’re pregnant — it has likely been there all along, but you’ve never noticed it before. The line can be so light in color that it’s practically invisible, and when it’s like that, it’s known as the linea alba (white line).

During pregnancy, that line darkens and becomes the linea nigra (black line).

iStock

Of course, the line isn’t actually black — it’s more of a dark brown. It’s typically about 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide, and will get darker as you get further along in your pregnancy. You’ll probably begin to notice it around the fifth month.

No one knows exactly where the line comes from or why it happens, but there are lots of theories. Some doctors think it’s related to your changing hormones. According to Mom Loves Best, the line “marks the point where your right and left abdominal muscles meet in the middle. Once these muscles start to separate to accommodate your growing uterus, it is often accompanied by the presence of the linea nigra.”

One theory is that the line appears because of the extra estrogen being secreted by your body during pregnancy. This stimulates cells in your skin called melanocytes, which produce the pigment that darkens your skin.

There are even old wives’ tales surrounding the linea nigra.

iStock

One is that it helps predict the gender of your baby, saying that it means you’re having a boy. Another one says that if the line ends at your belly button instead of going down to your pubic area, it means you’re having a girl.

Even if doctors don’t know exactly where it came from, they do know that it’s completely normal and not something you need to stress over. And if you’re worried about it sticking around, don’t: the linea nigra often disappears a few months after giving birth.

Linea Nigra: Everything You Need to Know

Emma Darvick Emma Darvick

Linea nigra is a dark line stretching from the top of the pubic hair to the belly button, although it sometimes extends to the breast. It’s totally normal while expecting, and it lingers after you give birth. We tapped into our experts to fill you in on this common condition, with tips for getting rid of it.

What Causes Linea Nigra?

The linea nigra is the result of fluctuating hormones during pregnancy. One theory is that the hormones cause your body to produce larger amount of melanin (a compound responsible for giving your skin pigment), and this extra pigmentation shows up as a dark pregnancy line on your stomach. Women of all different skin colors are affected, although linea nigra can be more pronounced in women with fair skin.

  • RELATED: 10 Strange Pregnancy Symptoms

When Does Linea Nigra Appear?

According to OB-GYN Michelle Tollefson, M.D., an assistant professor in the department of health professions, integrative therapies program at Metropolitan State College of Denver, linea nigra often appears in the second trimester and persists throughout pregnancy. Typically about one centimeter in width, the line usually starts at the pubic bone and continues up to the belly button, though it can extend to just below the breast in some cases.

Is Linea Nigra Dangerous?

No, this pregnant belly line isn’t dangerous, although its appearance may be disconcerting. In fact, up to 75 percent of women will experience this hormone-induced darkening of the skin during pregnancy. “It’s considered cosmetic and nothing that is worrisome,” says Dr. Tollefson.

  • RELATED: 23 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy

When Does Linea Nigra Go Away?

Linea nigra typically resolves on its own within a few months of delivery, so many experts advise not treating it — especially during pregnancy or if you are breastfeeding. “Stay away from bleaching creams, as they often contain hydroquinone, which has not been proven safe to use if you are pregnant or nursing,” says Vaneeta Sheth, M.D., an associate physician and instructor in dermatology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

How to Get Rid of Linea Nigra

If you really want to get rid of linea nigra, Dr. Sheth says you may use bleaching creams after delivery if you’re formula-feeding, or you could try a fade cream or topical retinol. If you want a natural approach, try applying a little lemon juice to your skin. “Some women say the acids help fade hyperpigmentation,” Dr. Sheth says.

To minimize the discoloration, you should also keep your belly covered when you head to the beach, and don’t use tanning beds (which you should be avoiding anyway). But rest assured that after your baby is born the line will disappear eventually!

  • RELATED: 6 Postpartum Body Problems—And How to Fix Them

Ab Cracks: The Totally Unrealistic Body Trend You ~Shouldn’t~ Strive For

Stocked House Studio/

First, there was the thigh gap. Then, there was the bikini bridge, the controversial trend of taking selfies from the chest down to show off the gap between bathing suit bottoms and the hip bones.

Now, there’s another arbitrary (and unrealistic, but we’ll get to that later) body craze. It’s been dubbed the “ab crack,” and it looks like a shallow, well-defined ditch running down the center of the stomach. (Related: This Fitness Model Turned Body-Image Advocate Is Happier Now That She’s Less Fit)

Technically, the ab crack is called the linea alba, and it’s a tendinous inscription between your ab muscles, says Rob Sulaver, C.S.C.S. with BandanaTraining.com. Models like Bella Hadid and Emily Ratajkowski and social media star Jen Selter have been sporting ab cracks all over Instagram, making you think it’s the new bikini bod norm.

But here’s why you shouldn’t beat yourself up if you don’t have one: “All of that is pretty much determined by your genetics,” Sulaver says. “You can train your abs and make them more pronounced by working them hard, but for the most part, you’re not going to change the structure.”

So don’t even think about striving for it. An ab crack is just not realistic, and it’s definitely not worth swearing off summer’s beach-side happy hours for.

“Finding happiness is a little bit more complicated than having an irrigation ditch on your stomach,” says Sulaver. “Happiness comes with a balanced relationship with health and fitness.” (Related: Why Losing Weight Doesn’t Always Lead to Body Confidence)

Feeling good about your body should be the ultimate goal. No ab crack, thigh gap, bikini bridge, or whatever craze comes next required.

  • By Moira Lawler
  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • Wondering what that pregnancy belly line – or linea nigra – really means?

    Pregnancy is an exciting, amazing and scary time – it’s a rollercoaster of emotions for women, and your body is going through so many weird and wonderful changes.

    We’re not just talking about the bump that will soon be protruding – your skin will go through some alterations too, including a dark line which seems to appear overnight during the second or third trimester.

    The linea nigra is a latin term which literally translates to ‘black line’, and describes the dark vertical line which so often appears on the abdomen of pregnant women.

    It’s estimated that around 75 per cent of pregnant women will experience some evidence of linea nigra – it can be darker on some and lighter on others.

    What is the linea nigra?

    The linea nigra is simply a line that forms, running vertically on the pregnant belly. ‘Some women experience significant skin changes in the 2nd trimester, mostly darkening of the skin,’ says midwife Marie Louise.

    ‘Some women get darker patches on the forehead or cheeks, if this is the case ensure you protect your skin from the sun.’

    The linea nigra generally appears to run from the umbilicus (your belly button) and runs straight down to the pubic bone. But it can also run from the umbilicus upwards, towards – and almost level with – with the ribcage.

    It may be a slight shade of brown or a darker pigment to almost black in colour.

    You will start to notice it from during the second (weeks 13 – 27) and third (29 – 40 weeks) trimester.

    In the same vein, dark lines may also appear around your belly button, areolas and vagina too, but they should all disappear nine to 12 months after birth.

    Why does the linea nigra develop?

    It’s all down to hormones. Oh yes, they’ve been a constant in your life, from moodswings during your period, to that cluster of chin spots which appear as if from nowhere and for no reason. When you’re pregnant hormones make their comeback with a vengeance and it’s not just monthly, it’s for nine whole months.

    The linea nigra is due to an increase in the melanocyte stimulating hormone which causes skin cells to darken. This is specifically down to high levels of oestrogen, which has a direct effect on the melanocyte stimulating hormone which is manufactured by the placenta.

    Can the linea nigra predict the gender of my baby?

    There are so many old wives tales out there about how to find out the gender of your baby, and the linea nigra is definitely one of them.

    Apparently, if it extends from your navel downwards towards your pubic bone then you’re more likely to have a girl. However, if your linea nigra is heading ‘north’ – from your navel up towards your head – then you are more likely to have a boy. However, there’s no conclusive evidence to prove that this will always be the case.

    What is the linea nigra actually for?

    It has been said by many a midwife that the body’s natural evolution meant that the development of the linea nigra was specifically to help baby find the breast.

    Midwife Marie Louise explains: ‘The linea nigra is perfectly normal, it’s a hormonal change and there mainly to facilitate darkening of nipples so that your baby is able to see the his/her target for breastfeeding.’

    The dark line of the linea nigra acts as a direction from mum’s pregnant belly up towards the darkened areola, for baby to latch on.

    In the days before modern medicine, newborns were left with mum skin-on-skin straight from birth. It was in this time that baby would instinctively shimmy up the belly, nuzzling to find the breast.

    It is believed that the scent of the mother’s nipple is similar to the amniotic fluid, which surrounds the foetus for nine months so the baby recognises and trusts it.

    Pregnancy Line – Linea Nigra

    The Pregnancy Line, which is more official called Linea Nigra, is the dark line that develops across your belly during pregnancy. It is possible that the line may have previously been there, however, because it was so light in color in went unnoticed. Prior to line prior to pregnancy is light or pale line is called the linea alba (white line). It runs from your navel to the pubic bone. It darkens during pregnancy acquiring the name linea nigra (black line).

    The pregnancy line is never really black, however, it is brownish and darker in color. It is usually about ¼ to ½ inch wide and stretches vertically down your belly from the pubis to the umbilicus. The pregnancy line or linea nigra usually grows darker as your pregnancy develops. Although it can show earlier, this pregnancy line typically shows up around the 5th month of pregnancy.

    What Causes the Linea Nigra or Pregnancy Line?

    The pregnancy line is a natural part of pregnancy. The specific cause of the linea nigra is unknown, but it is believed to be related to the changing hormones or the imbalance of hormones as a result of your developing baby. One theory is that the melanocyte-stimulating hormone created by the placenta is the main contributing factor. This hormone is also believed to cause the darkening around the nipples.

    What can you do to prevent the pregnancy line

    There is nothing you can do to prevent the pregnancy line. It is a natural part of pregnancy. The good news is that it usually lessens and fades away shortly after the birth of your baby.

    Compiled from the following resources:

    What is linea nigra?

    During her 2nd pregnancy, television presenter Rochelle Humes took to Instagram to ask fans what the dark line down the middle of her belly was.

    Advertisement

    The answer? It’s her linea nigra – literally ‘black line’ in Latin – that appears during pregnancy, running from your belly button down to your pubic area. It replaces the ‘linea alba’ (white line) you had all the time before pregnancy but probably didn’t notice.

    What causes linea nigra?

    Your skin becomes hyper-pigmented when you’re pregnant, thanks to hormones – which means the linea alba becomes darker.

    When does it appear?

    The linea nigra usually appears in your 2nd trimester, though not everyone gets one, and that’s nothing to worry about. It’s also more likely to appear on darker skin; if you’re pale, you might have one but just don’t notice it.

    Can I get rid of it?

    You can help to stop it becoming darker by wearing sun block or covering your stomach if you’re out in the sun.

    But really the best thing for it is to give it time: after you’ve had your baby, the linea nigra should fade away over a few months.

    Can you tell the sex of your baby from the linea nigra?

    The old wives’ tale has it that if your linea nigra keeps going above your belly button you’re having a boy, and if it stops below your belly button it’s a girl.

    But, as with most of these things, there’s no scientific evidence to back it up (sorry ? )

    What do our mums say about linea nigra?

    There’s loads of chat in our forum on the topic of linea nigra: we especially noticed how lots of you were really keen to get one, for example, Podington said:

    “I got so excited this morning as I thought one had developed, but no!! It was just a crease from how I was laying lol!!”

    And, really interestingly, we also discovered from the mums in our forum that just, because you get a linea nigra for one pregnancy, it doesn’t mean you’ll automatically have one again the next time round.

    Heather743 said: “With my 1st two children, I got it round about the 16-week mark and it got darker and darker as time went on.

    “BUT! Here I am 30 weeks on Friday with number 3 and no sign of it yet!!”

    And Mandie had a similar experience: “I’m on my 3rd, due in 3 weeks and this time I don’t have one either and in my previous 2 I did.

    “A friend of mine said the same thing happened with her 3rd. It’s strange, I guess your body reacts in different ways in each pregnancy?”

    While in general, as we mentioned above, the linea nigra usually appears in your 2nd trimester, that’s not always the case.

    K-lou got hers really early, and also noticed it grew longer as the weeks went on: “I am a bit odd I got mine – and this is my 1st baby – at 11 weeks!

    “It was just from my belly button down, but now I am 19+5 and starting to get one that goes up as well. Some girls just don’t get them though.”

    And finally, on the question of how long their linea nigra took to fade, our mums differed.

    Claire-abelle says: “I’d say mine took a good 3 months to fade, maybe a bit longer – but it will go eventually.”

    And Soda said: “Mine went at around 6 months, although I’ve now found out I’m pregnant again with twins… and it has come back, but only really faint this time.”

    Photos: Getty/Rochelle Humes on Instagram

    Advertisement

    • Rochelle Humes shares weirdest pregnancy craving yet
    • The stretch mark selfies taking over Instagram
    • How pregnancy changes your hair

    Abs have been a hot topic for a while now, so let’s talk about them: what they are, how to get them, and like, if we even want them. (The answer to that last question is an obvious yes.) Getting abs became trendy in the early 2000’s around the time when people started to realize they wanted J.Lo’s six pack instead of Mary-Kate Olsen’s emaciated rib cage. Then, the ab crack suddenly became the new thigh gap of the internet and we started Googling shit like “Khloé Kardashian workout routine.” All of this important history brings us to today, where we’re left staring at our SoulCycle instructor’s chiseled stomach and wondering how many calories were in that bagel we ate earlier. If you’re looking for some real info, it’s time to get some facts straight. Having good abs is more than just a flat tummy—as Meek Mill once said, there’s levels to this shit. Meaning, there are a lot of different parts of your abs and you can’t just do one exercise to tone all of them. So here’s the deal with all your various ab muscles and what exercises you need to do to get amazing abs all over.

    That Line Down the Middle

    What is it? You may know this line down the middle of the stomach area as an ab crack, which is unfortunately not a drug you can take to get abs. But if our dealer was selling that, we’d save so much on groceries. Anyway. The ab crack isn’t actually a muscle and so it doesn’t get a real name, but the best way to get it is by having good genes and doing basic toning exercises. Genes are a huge part of it, and some people can have like, no body fat and a strong core, and still not have that line. We’re all built differently, so let’s work with what we’ve got.

    Morning

    A post shared by Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) on

    Mar 19, 2017 at 7:59am PDT

    How do I get it? Planks. It may sound basic AF, but planks are an amazing way to target the entire front of your core, so stop overthinking fancy and complex exercises and start planking. If you’re a beginner, start on your hands, but starting on your elbows really targets the muscles better. Basically, you want to start facedown with your forearms on the floor and your knees raised up so that only your toes and arms are touching the ground. Make sure you’re contracting your abs and not sticking your butt in the air, or else you’re literally doing nothing. Also, make sure to keep your back as flat as possible the whole time. Hold for anywhere from 30 seconds to two full minutes. If you’re respectively psychotic and you’re looking for an added challenge, try doing your plank in a TRX suspension trainer at your gym—if you don’t even know what that is, it’s best to stick to the regular planks for now.

    Those Side Lines

    What are they? The “side lines” you see all over Instagram, especially during bikini season (probably while fake laughing on an inflatable swan in East Hampton), are actually called your obliques. Obliques are the most superficial muscle out of the muscles in your abdomen, which means they look hot but actually don’t help you that much in terms of being strong. But who cares about strength? They’ll look amaze in your Instagram pics.

    How do I get them? Russian Twists. There are tons of exercises that target your obliques (others include bicycles and side planks), but Russian twists are really the most effective way to tone those side muscles that look so good in a crop top. Start by sitting on the floor with a weight in your hand (think anything from 8 to 15 pounds) and your feet slightly raised off the ground. Your legs should be bent at your knees and your upper body should be elevated to create a folding V shape with your legs. Move the weight from one side of your body to the other, ideally touching the weight to the ground on each side of you during every rep. Do this for 30 seconds to a minute, then rest for a few seconds and repeat again. It might hurt when you laugh tomorrow, but in that case I guess it’s a good thing we have permanent RBF.

    That V-Shape At The Bottom

    What is it? No one would ever comment on an Instagram pic to compliment someone’s lower abs, but like, why not? That shit is really hard to achieve and honestly I could use a post-workout snack just thinking about all that work. Working your lower abs is super important, even if you don’t necessarily want chiseled abs, because it will help eliminate love handles in the process.

    I will always consider myself an athlete. My workouts are about survival, longevity strength and endurance. I realized working out should be about getting smarter as well as stronger. Shoutout @allanamato for the beautiful photography!

    A post shared by Terry Crews (@terrycrews) on

    Jun 26, 2016 at 12:52pm PDT

    How do I get it? Well first before anybody asks, you do NOT need to become a man (or Terry Crews) to get the V-cut thing; that was just the best (read: hottest) picture I could find. Anywho. Leg raises. This move looks super easy when you see someone doing it, but once you start, you’ll be crying pretty fast. Lying on the floor, place your legs straight out in front of you and your hands on the ground or under your lower back if you’re prone to lower back pain. Lift your legs up, keeping them as straight as possible with your knees slightly bent until they make a 90-degree angle with the floor. Hold the contraction at the top for the second, then SLOWLY lower your legs down to the floor in front of you. You’ll want to make sure you use a mat to protect your tailbone and stop fucking holding your breath. Seriously, what is it with people not breathing while working their abs? You’re not underwater and people around you are starting to get worried.

    Inner Core Muscles

    What are they? The workouts we’ve discussed so far will all help tone your abs, but as we mentioned earlier, your core muscles go much deeper than you realize, so you should prob be working those inner layers too. A lot of people get caught up in working the area around their stomachs, but they don’t realize that most of your core stability comes from your lumbar spine and lower back area, so try hitting those muscles too if you care about really strengthening your entire core area.

    How do I get them? Superman lifts. Everyone has these inner core muscles, but they’re pretty weak if you don’t work to strengthen them, and Superman lifts are the best way. Lie facedown on your stomach with your arms and legs extended and keep your neck in a neutral position. Then, keeping them straight and your torso tight, lift your arms and legs toward the ceiling, arching your back and getting your hands and feet like, five inches off the floor. Hold for a couple seconds at the top and then lower back down. If you’re doing it right, you’ll feel like an idiot. Try doing 10-15 reps before the embarrassment takes over resting and then repeating again.

    I know it sucks to spend extra time at the gym to do some work that’s low-key good for you, but you stuck around last week for like, 15 minutes to find good selfie lighting, so we’re gonna assume you have the time.

    Images: Christopher Campbell / Unsplash; Giphy (4); Emily Ratajkowski, Kayla Itsines, Terry Crews / Instagram

    Author:

    Say Yes to the Betch

    View profile

    Our
    Blog.

    ABS Crack- How to get those lines

    Getting abs became trendy in the early 2000’s around the time when people started to realize they wanted J.Lo’s six pack instead of Mary-Kate Olsen’s emaciated rib cage. Then, the ab crack suddenly became the new thigh gap of the internet.

    If you’re looking for some real info, it’s time to get some facts straight. Having good abs is more than just a flat tummy—as Meek Mill once said, there are levels to this shit. Meaning, there are a lot of different parts of your abs and you can’t just do one exercise to tone all of them. So here’s the deal with all your various ab muscles and what exercises you need to do to get amazing abs all over.

    3 things to do:

    1. Drop body fat below 12%
    2. Perform heavy compound movements
    3. Perform abs exercise 3-4 times per week of obliques and transverse abs.

    That Line Down in the Middle:

    What is it? You may know this line down the middle of the stomach area as an ab crack, which is unfortunately not a drug you can take to get abs. But if our dealer was selling that, we’d save so much on groceries. Anyway. The ab crack isn’t actually a muscle and so it doesn’t get a real name, but the best way to get it is by having good genes and doing basic toning exercises.

    How do I get it? Planks. It may sound basic AF, but planks are an amazing way to target the entire front of your core, so stop overthinking fancy and complex exercises and start planking.

    What is it? No one would ever comment on an Instagram pic to compliment someone’s lower abs, but like, why not? That shit is really hard to achieve and honestly I could use a post-workout snack just thinking about all that work. Working your lower abs is super important, even if you don’t necessarily want chiseled abs, because it will help eliminate love handles in the process.

    How do I get it? Leg raises.

    The Adonis Belt, also known as V-cut abs, is the key to completing an attractive physique. But if you’re not born with the best genetics, you may not be able to see it yet

    To work more on oblique and transverse abs to get those V -cut.

    Transverse abs: work more on stablise of the spine: squat, deadlift, leg raises.. Heavy compoud exercises:
    1. Side Plank 1’ ea x 4

    2. Hanging leg raises front and side

    3. Cable wood chopper/ abs rotation

    Oblique: lateral

    What are they? The workouts we’ve discussed so far will all help tone your abs, but as we mentioned earlier, your core muscles go much deeper than you realize, so you should prob be working those inner layers too. A lot of people get caught up in working the area around their stomachs, but they don’t realize that most of your core stability comes from your lumbar spine and lower back area, so try hitting those muscles too if you care about really strengthening your entire core area.

    How do I get them? Superman lifts. Everyone has these inner core muscles, but they’re pretty weak if you don’t work to strengthen them, and Superman lifts are the best way

    To summary the list of above, here are some exercises to target your total Abs, that you can do in 28 days, make sure to challange your body to give one extra rep each day.

    • Plank
    • Russian Twist
    • Leg Raise
    • Side Plank ( and variations such as lifting top leg)
    • Cable wood chops ( abs rotation, can be used with dumbbells)
    • Hanging leg raise ( front, sides or sitted leg raises)
    • Superman

    And the most important is your diet: do not guessing your macro, use some app to track your calories such as My Fitness Pal… etc, or eat clean with plenty of green veggies, complex carb and protein.

    Want more tips on Nutrition, go to our Nutrition Blog

    Wednesday, March 13th, 2019

    Stomach Rash

    What is stomach rash?

    Rash is a symptom that causes the affected area of skin to turn red and blotchy and to swell. A rash may cause spots that are bumpy, scaly, flaky, or filled with pus. Rashes can vary in location, pattern and extent and may occur in any area of the body. A rash on your stomach can have a variety of causes, and it may indicate something occurring around the stomach itself or suggest a systemic (body-wide) condition.

    Contact dermatitis (skin inflammation) is caused by an adverse reaction to something that touches your skin, including chemicals found in detergent, soap or a fragrance. For example, you may develop a rash on your stomach when wearing a new shirt or blouse or after washing clothing with a new brand of detergent. Other forms of contact dermatitis include exposure to certain plants, such as poison oak or ivy, an animal bite, or an insect sting. Lyme disease is caused by tick bite and can first appear as a circle with a bull’s-eye pattern, then progress to a rash.

    Looking for a Doctor?

    Find a 5-Star Dermatologist Near You

    Allergies to food and medications are potentially serious sources of rash. Peanuts, shellfish, strawberries and avocados are just some of the foods that can trigger allergic reactions. These foods may cause mild reactions; however, in some cases reactions could develop into potentially life-threatening conditions characterized by vomiting, difficulty breathing, and swelling. Allergic purpura is a serious, often life-threatening allergic reaction that can cause a skin rash but can also affect the joints, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys.

    Rashes may also occur in skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and impetigo. The stomach is a common location for psoriasis eruptions, which cause scaly white spots and inflammation. Other causes of rash include autoimmune disorders that occur when the body is attacked by its own immune system, which normally serves to protect it from foreign invaders (antigens). Kawasaki disease is a rare, but extremely serious, condition in children that is thought to have an autoimmune origin. It commonly occurs with a very high fever and rash, which might begin on the stomach. Many viruses, including those that cause common childhood diseases, can produce rash. Scarlet fever often begins with a rash on the stomach before spreading to other parts of the body.

    Rashes can be caused by an allergic reaction to food, medications, or products such as lotions or detergents. These reactions can range from mild to potentially life threatening, especially if swelling and constriction of breathing occurs, which could indicate anaphylaxis. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if a rash is accompanied by any serious symptoms including swelling of the face, swelling and constriction of the throat, difficulty breathing, fainting, change in level of consciousness or alertness, pale skin, or purple rash.

    Seek prompt medical care if a rash is persistent or causes you concern.

    What other symptoms might occur with stomach rash?

    Stomach rash may be accompanied by other symptoms, depending on the underlying disease, disorder or condition. Certain conditions that cause stomach rash may also involve other body systems.

    Related localized symptoms that may occur along with stomach rash

    Stomach rash may be accompanied by other localized symptoms including:

    • Bruising
    • Itchiness
    • Pus or discharge
    • Redness, warmth or swelling
    • Tenderness or pain

    Other symptoms that may occur along with stomach rash

    Stomach rash may accompany symptoms related to other body systems including:

    • Cough
    • Fever and chills
    • Headache
    • Joint stiffness and pain
    • Runny nose
    • Sore throat
    • Sweating

    Serious symptoms that might indicate a life-threatening condition

    In some cases, stomach rash may be a symptom of a life-threatening condition that should be evaluated immediately in an emergency setting. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you, or someone you are with, have stomach rash along with other serious symptoms including:

    • Change in level of consciousness or alertness, such as passing out or unresponsiveness

    • Fever and chills

    • Joint pain and stiffness

    • Purple rash

    • Respiratory or breathing problems, such as shortness of breath, difficulty breathing or inability to breathe, labored breathing, wheezing, or choking

    • Sudden swelling of the face, lips or tongue

    • Tightness or constriction in the throat

    • Worsening of symptoms despite treatment

    What causes stomach rash?

    Stomach rash may have many possible causes, including allergens (agents that cause allergies), infections, autoimmune disorders, or other causes such as stress.

    Allergic or inflammatory causes of stomach rash

    Stomach rash may be caused by contact dermatitis. Common triggers include:

    • Cosmetics, dyes or detergents

    • Industrial chemicals, such as those found in elastic, latex and rubber

    • Metallic substances (various metals, copper, wire)

    • Poison ivy or oak

    Other allergic causes of stomach rash include:

    • Eczema (skin disorder causing scaly or blistering rashes that may be caused by allergy)

    • Food allergies (allergic reactions to certain foods)

    • Insect bite allergy such as a bee sting

    Infectious causes of stomach rash

    Stomach rash can also be caused by infections including:

    • Chickenpox or shingles

    • Eczema (skin disorder causing scaly or blistering rashes that may be caused by infection)

    • Erythema nodosum (red nodules under the skin associated with fever and other symptoms)

    • Impetigo

    • Lyme disease or Rocky Mountain spotted fever (inflammatory bacterial diseases spread by tick bites)

    • Measles, mumps, rubella, roseola, and scarlet fever

    • Meningitis (infection or inflammation of the sac around the brain and spinal cord)

    • Pityriasis rosea (rash resembling the shape of a pine tree)

    • Ringworm

    • Strep throat (bacterial throat infection)

    Autoimmune causes of stomach rash

    Stomach rash can also be caused by autoimmune disorders including:

    • Kawasaki disease (rare, serious pediatric disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels, high fever, rash, and mucous membrane changes)

    • Psoriasis

    • Rheumatoid arthritis (chronic autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation)

    • Systemic lupus erythematosus (disorder in which the body attacks its own healthy cells and tissues)

    Other causes of stomach rash

    Stomach rash can be caused by other factors such as:

    • Extreme cold or heat

    • Medications

    • Stress

    Serious or life-threatening causes of stomach rash

    In some cases, stomach rash may be a symptom of a serious or life-threatening condition that should be evaluated immediately in an emergency setting. These include:

    • Allergic purpura

    • Anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction)

    Questions for diagnosing the cause of stomach rash

    To diagnose your condition, your doctor or licensed health care practitioner will ask you several questions related to your rash including:

    • When did the rash begin?

    • Are you taking any medications?

    • Do you have any known allergies?

    • Does the rash cause any itching or scaling?

    • Do you feel otherwise healthy?

    • Have you tried any new products recently, such as soaps, perfumes, or sprays?

    • Have you spent a lot of time outdoors lately?

    What are the potential complications of stomach rash?

    Because stomach rash may be due to serious diseases, failure to seek treatment can result in serious complications and permanent damage. For example, infectious diseases, such as mumps or measles, can lead to rare but serious complications, including miscarriage, hearing loss, and serious brain infections, such as encephalitis or meningitis.

    Once the underlying cause of your rash is diagnosed, it is important for you to follow the treatment plan that you and your health care professional design specifically for you to reduce the risk of potential complications including:

    • Arthritis

    • Cellulitis (infection of the skin)

    • Cognitive difficulties

    • Encephalitis (inflammation and swelling of the brain due to a viral infection or other causes)

    • Meningitis (infection or inflammation of the sac around the brain and spinal cord)

    • Miscarriage or stillbirth

    • Paralysis

    • Permanent hearing loss

    • Secondary infections, which may develop from scratching and related skin trauma

    Linea Nigra is a Latin term which quite literally means “black line”. This is a good way to describe the dark vertical line which so often appears on the abdomen of pregnant women.

    It’s estimated that around 75%, of pregnant women will experience some degree of Linea Nigra.

    Depending on the individual woman and her skin, Linea Nigra can be quite light and barely visible, while for others it can be much darker than the surrounding skin and stand out much more clearly.

    What does Linea Nigra look like?

    It may be a slight shade of brown or a darker pigment of brown to almost black. Linea Nigra is generally around a centimetre wide and the same width along its entire length. It most commonly appears from the umbilicus (belly button) running straight down to the pubic bone. But it can also run vertically from the umbilicus up to almost level with the ribcage and occasionally, up between the breasts.

    Linea Nigra tends to form during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. It starts off around the fourth or fifth month of pregnancy as a very fine line which slowly expands and becomes darker. As the tummy enlarges the width and intensity of Linea Nigra also expands.

    Check: www.huggies.com.au/pregnancy/week-by-week

    What Causes Linea Nigra to Form?

    Linea Nigra formation is due to an increase in the hormone which causes skin cells to become dark. During pregnancy high levels of oestrogen have an effect on the melanocyte stimulating hormone which is manufactured by the placenta.

    The little understood issue with Linea Nigra is that it is a line which may always have been present, it’s just that until the influence of melanocyte stimulating hormone it wasn’t nearly as visible. Linea Alba (meaning white line) is the term for the line which changes into Linea Nigra as a result of becoming darker.

    Another influencing factor is that as the abdominal muscles stretch and separate, Linea Nigra tends to form. The line which is created is certainly more prominent in some women than others and marks the midway point between the left and right abdominal muscles and where they meet in the centre. These “strap” muscles need to separate to allow the pregnant abdomen to grow. Some people believe it is the relative “thinness” of the skin which is the cause for Linea Nigra formation.

    The hormonal effect of increased melanin production is also responsible for many other skin changes during pregnancy, including the nipples becoming darker. Moles, birthmarks and freckles often appear darker as well. Even scar tissue can begin to appear darker and more obvious than before.

    Chloasma, otherwise known as “The Mask of Pregnancy” or “Butterfly Mask” across the face and cheekbones, is also caused by this rise in melanocyte stimulating hormone.

    Will Linea Nigra Harm Me or My Baby?

    No, it will not harm you or your growing baby. Linea Nigra is considered wholly “cosmetic” and the only negative issue of having Linea Nigra is that some women consider it to be unsightly. But it is just one of the many minor issues which arise during pregnancy and for most women, resolve after their baby is born.

    Check: https://www.huggies.com.au/pregnancy/health-and-care/physical-changes

    Linea Nigra is restricted to external skin cells and does not cause a discolouration of darkening of the uterus or the baby. It is quite literally “skin deep”.

    What Can I Do to Prevent Getting Linea Nigra?

    There is nothing specific you can do to prevent the formation of Linea Nigra or reduce your likelihood of getting it. If you have dark or olive skin then you are more likely to experience it. If your parents have dark skin and your genetic inheritance is to tan rather than burn, then again, you are more likely to develop Linea Nigra.

    Fair skinned women are not as prone to developing Linea Nigra, just as they are less likely to tan as a result of sun exposure. We cannot change the colour of our skin, or the changes which occur as a result of pregnancy hormones.

    Some women find that if their skin is exposed to the sun then it becomes more noticeable. However, if their skin tends to tan, the surrounding skin becomes darker as well as their Linea Nigra and this means there is not such a contrast.

    What Treatment is Recommended for Linea Nigra?

    There is no specific treatment which is recommended or generally warranted. Most women find that it settles and becomes progressively less obvious within the first few months of their baby’s birth. This fading is gradual and over time there is a steady lightening.

    For those women who are having their first baby, the appearance of Linea Nigra can come as quite a shock. Between pregnancies it can just about disappear but emerge again with subsequent pregnancies.

    Can I Bleach My Skin?

    Bleaching creams are not recommended and although some may claim to work miracles, the fact is that most don’t. The compound contained in many bleaching products is known as hydroquinone, a form of chemical which is an inhibitor for melanin production. Products containing hydroquinone have not been assessed as safe to use during pregnancy or lactation.

    If you are very keen to trial a skin care product which is designed to lighten skin, then speak with your doctor and a pharmacist about what they recommend and what has been assessed as being safe to use. Some creams contain topical retinol which, in the correct concentration can deliver lightening effects.

    A “natural” alternative may be lemon juice; however its effects are variable and can cause skin irritation and burning if not diluted with water.

    Some women like to rub emollient cream or oils into their tummy believing this will help reduce the likelihood of developing Linea Nigra, but there is no evidence to support this theory. Using creams and lotions on the tummy can help pregnant women believe that by doing “something” they are at least making an effort, no matter how negligible the benefits. And there is no harm in doing this.

    What Your Linea Nigra is Telling You.

    If you believe in old wives tales then your Linea Nigra could be telling you something! If it extends from your navel downwards towards your pubic bone then you’re more likely to have a girl. However, if your Linea Nigra is heading north e.g. from your navel up towards your head then you are more likely to have a boy.

    But just remember, that the statistics of having either a boy or a girl are around 50% – a little higher for boys, so the odds are pretty high that your interpretation will be right whichever way you look at your Linea Nigra.

    Check: https://www.huggies.com.au/pregnancy/early-stages/gender-prediction/old-wives-tales

    ABS line down middle

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *