There are many reasons why people choose to become massage therapists, including the opportunity to help people, flexible working hours and relaxing work environments, often in some fairly exotic locations. In fact, for many people, it’s the absolute dream job!

Unfortunately though, it’s not all fun and games. Due to the nature of their work, massage therapists face the risk of a range of musculoskeletal injuries, particularly in the hands and wrists.

In a survey of more than 500 registered massage therapists, the number one flashpoints for pain after giving a massage were in the wrists and thumbs. And according to massage therapist Kathy Reitsch, this pain is likely the result of improper techniques. She suggests using gravity and the weight of the body to accomplish some of the work, rather than just the wrists, fingers and shoulders.

But administering massage using proper techniques isn’t always enough. You should also work on strengthening your hands, wrists and arms through exercise, in a bid to prevent injury.

With that in mind, here are some of the most common hand and wrist injuries that massage therapists can suffer, along with some practical exercises for not only relieving symptoms, but preventing injury in the first place.

Contents

Common hand and wrist complaints

The most common hand and wrist injuries in the massage therapy industry include:

  • Tenosynovitis – inflammation of the lining of the sheath covering the tendons, most often in the hands and wrists and caused by strain and overuse.
  • Saddle joint injury – pain in the saddle-shaped joint between the wrist and thumb due to overuse.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) – one of the most common injuries, where the median nerve becomes compressed at the wrist, causing burning, tingling, itching, pain and numbness in the hand.
  • Trigger thumb or trigger finger – pain and stiffness in the thumb or finger due to irritation in the tendon sheath, which becomes inflamed because of overuse.

Exercising the hands

Maintaining good physical condition is a big part of being a massage therapist, and should be an integral part of your personal injury prevention strategy. As the hands and arms are overtaxed by the work you do as a massage therapist, the hands are a great area in which to start your conditioning.

To reduce fatigue of the fingers and hands, it’s recommended that you always perform warming, stretching and strength building exercises before every massage.

Exercise #1

Hold your hands at chest level and shake them vigorously for about 10 seconds. This will warm and limber the muscles in your hands.

Exercise #2

Massage each finger from the knuckles of the hands to the fingertips for 5 to 10 seconds. This will stimulate circulation and help keep your hands supple.

Exercise #3

Bunch your hands into fists at chest level. Rotate both hands clockwise for ten seconds. Relax, then rotate the other way.

Exercise #4

Press one fist into the hand of the other, with each hand resisting. Alternate 10 times.

Exercise #5

Hold a semi-soft foam rubber ball between the thumb and first finger. Squeeze as hard as you can for ten reps. Repeat with other fingers, then vigorously shake your hands.

Exercise #6

Clasp your hands and interlace your fingers just below the waistline at the back of your body. Pull your arms upward while holding the tension for 10 counts. This will strengthen the muscles of your arms, shoulders and hands.

Exercising the wrists

The wrist is a highly complex mechanism with a lot of moving parts in one small area, so it is highly vulnerable to injury. Tendons on the extensor side can become irritated by tight muscles rubbing across them and the median nerve can be damaged where it exits the carpal tunnel at the base of the palm.

Performing these simple exercises several times a day between massage sessions will help strengthen your wrists and make them less susceptible to injuries.

Place your palms together at chest level. Press one hand against the other, moving back and forth. Repeat the presses ten times for supple and strong wrists.

Hold your hands at chest level. Grasp a small bar, or clinch your hands into tight fists. Squeeze the bar or your fists as hard as you can while counting to ten. Repeat three times to strengthen the hands and wrists.

Place one arm flat on a table and roll a small semi-soft foam rubber ball over the wrist and forearm with pressing and circular movements, exploring between the radius and ulna and applying moderate pressure to the wrist extensor mass. Repeat on the other arm.

Kneel down and extend both your hands in front of you on the floor, ensuring they are shoulder-width apart. Place the back of your palms on the floor with your fingers facing inwards towards your knees. Apply gentle pressure and hold this pose for 30 seconds. Release and shake your hands.

Place your arm straight out in front of your body with your wrist stretched and your palm facing the ground. Use your other hand to put a small amount of pressure on the back of your downward-facing hand, extending your fingers and wrist as far as you can. Hold for 20 seconds, then change hands and repeat.

Put your hands together in a position of prayer, then spread your fingers as far as you can while pushing them together, so that your palms are pushed away from each other. Do this two to three times per side and perform every hour or so.

Performing these simple exercises several times throughout the day will help keep your hands and wrists in peak physical condition. You may also benefit from soaking your hands in warm water for ten minutes or so before performing these exercises – this can warm them up and increase your flexibility. For a real treat, indulge in a warm paraffin wax bath – you’ll quickly feel the difference this can make to your hands and wrists!

Smart exercising

While exercising with massage in mind is vital, so is avoiding exercises that could be damaging or painful. As a general rule, you should avoid any exercises that:

  • Place a great deal of pressure on the hands, wrists and forearms.
  • Require repetitive movements using the hands, wrists or forearm muscles.
  • Put your hands or wrists into awkward postures.

Push-ups are a good example. They are a great core strengthening exercise, but when you perform a push-up, the weight of your upper body is transferred to your hands. Wrist curls are another activity to be cautious about – they’re great for building forearm strength, but play havoc with the wrists.

It’s important when conditioning your body to look for exercises that suit your needs as a massage therapist. There are plenty of core strengthening exercises out there that don’t strain the hands or wrists, including knee folds, forearm planks and oblique reaches. To work your forearms, try exercises like the Farmer’s Walk, which don’t involve moving your wrists back and forth.

Whatever exercise you do, keep your wrists as straight as possible and maintain a neutral posture. Remember to also be careful of your back, neck and shoulders, which are also overused in massage.

Other preventative measures

As well as having a regular exercise regime to keep your hands and wrists as strong and supple as possible, there are other simple precautions you can take as a massage therapist to reduce your likelihood of injury.

These include:

  • Take at least a 15-minute break between massage treatments to allow your body to stretch and shake off any tension that may have built up.
  • Know how many massage treatments you can effectively perform in a day and in a week, and try not to exceed this number.
  • Warm up and stretch before you begin work for the day to get fluids into your joints and to loosen up muscles, tendons and ligaments.
  • Consider using effort-saving tools where possible, such as an electric massage table that changes positions, or hand-held tools that can deliver the required therapy with less stress on your thumbs, forearms and wrists.
  • Trade services with colleagues to ensure your own massage therapy needs are being attended to.
  • Make sure you get enough sleep, eat healthy nutritious food and hydrate your body throughout the day.

Take care of yourself

In the massage profession, you need to take care of yourself before you can take care of others. Your hands are the tools of your trade and you must do everything you can to make sure they remain in top-notch condition.

Sore hands and wrists don’t have to be the result of giving massage when the right care is given to them and if you put a little time and effort into their conditioning, you’ll hopefully be rewarded with a fulfilling career that’s free from pain.

Are you looking to become a massage therapist, or a qualified therapist wanting to learn new techniques and improve your repertoire? Sign up today with Discover Massage Australia’s industry-recognised courses and learn new massage therapy skills today.

The Bodyweight Exercises Every Woman Should Master for Superior Strength

In her time as a top trainer-which includes whipping contestants (and couch sitters) into shape for NBC’s The Biggest Loser for the past two years-Jen Widerstrom has identified a short list of mega-exercises that pave the way to a super-fit body. They are no-equipment classics but also the ones she witnessed many women struggle to nail with textbook form. Aim to conquer this mix of strengtheners, Widerstrom says, “and you’ll feel empowered like never before.” That’s because challenging moves like these sculpt a head-to-toe chain of muscles and build your athleticism and physical skills for a big shot of body confidence. (Seriously-getting strong will make you look and feel sexy AF.)

To make sure you ace all six, Widerstrom breaks down the basics of each exercise. Pump up your muscle capacity before each set with this game-changing bit of mental prep: Visualize yourself doing the exercise that you’re about to attempt, and you’ll feel a boost in your strength by up to 24 percent-without working a single muscle, according to a study in the North American Journal of Psychology. It’s possible that such imagery lights up your brain in a way that activates areas involved with motor skills. “Trust the reality that your body is incredibly powerful,” Widerstrom says. “And really go for it.” You’ve got this. And you’re about to get the body to prove it.

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L-Sit

Sit on the floor with your legs long and palms flat by thighs, then elevate your body by pressing into your palms.”It’s deceptively tough for such a small movement, but it’s the best static hold you can do for your core because you have to pull your abs in so deeply and wrap your core up so tightly to lift your body,” Widerstorm says. “There’s no way around it.” Your shoulders and glutes also get a solid dose of sculpting, since they hoist you up and keep you there. Here are three steps that will help you nail it.

1. Make it halfway easier by starting with a single-leg L sit. Sit on the floor with legs together and extended, feet-flexed, and hands on floor outside of your thighs, fingertips 2 to 3 inches behind your knees, thumbs under thighs, and wrists touching the outside of your legs. With your fingers spread, press your palms into the floor, hollow your core, and straighten arms to lift your butt and right leg. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 2 to 3 times. Switch legs and repeat.

2. Separate legs wide for a straddle hold to make them lighter and easier to lift while still accessing the same muscle groups. Sit on the floor with legs wide, feet flexed, and hands pressing into floor between thighs and about a foot apart. Press your palms into the floor, hollow your core, and straighten arms to lift your butt and legs, but leave your heels gently on the floor. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 2 to 3 times. (Skip the sit-ups; planks are a better way to engage your core.)

3. Create more space than the floor allows to get more muscles involved in the lift by doing an L sit on 2 boxes or benches (or parallette bars!). Place the sturdy boxes or benches slightly wider than hip-width apart, and stand between them with legs together. Plant one hand on each box, hollow your core, and straighten your arms to lift your legs as high as you can. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 2 to 3 times.

The Perfect L Sit: Sit on the floor with your legs long and together, feet flexed, hands on floor outside of your thighs, fingertips 2 to 3 inches behind your knees, thumbs under your upper thighs, and wrists touching the outside of your legs (any farther back and you won’t be able to get off the floor). Exhale, keep your shoulders wide, press your palms into the floor, hollow your core, and squeeze your legs together. Then straighten arms to lift your butt and then your legs and heels about 1/4 inch off the floor. Hold as long as you can. “When you exhale to lift, do it as if you’re blowing out a candle, which allows you to wrap a corset around your waist that pulls every muscle together into a tightly knit package.”

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Handstand

It’s you against gravity, balancing your body weight on the palms of your hands. The good news is that everyone has the strength to do this, Widerstrom says. It’s the skill behind it that takes the most time to master: “You have to practice handstands-a lot-to get good at them,” she says. A big part of that practice is in your head, learning to be OK with the idea of being upside down. “But when you conquer this exercise,” she says, “you’ll change your whole outlook on what seems challenging to you, asking yourself, What else am I capable of?” This is where you start. (Also try this yoga flow that will prime your body for nailing a handstand.)

1. Get comfortable being inverted and learn how to place your hands by starting with a 90-degree hip stand with shoulder taps. Stand facing away from a sturdy box or bench. Fold forward to plant hands on the floor, and step feet up and onto the box so your body forms an upside-down L shape. Then shift weight into left hand and tap right hand to left shoulder. Switch sides; repeat. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 12 reps, alternating sides.

2. Do wall walks to start to straighten out your handstand while still being supported. Start on floor in plank position with feet pressing into a wall. Slowly walk hands toward wall in 3-inch steps, walking feet up wall as high as you are comfortable (the goal is to bring your body to fully touch the wall). Reverse the movement to get back down. Do 2 to 3 sets of 5 to 6 reps.

3. Learn how to kick up with support by doing handstands against a wall. Stand facing a wall, 2 to 3 feet away from it. Quickly fold from hips to plant hands on floor in front of wall, kicking your legs up one at a time until they rest on the wall. Hold that position as long as you can, letting your heels come off the wall a few moments at a time so you’re not completely reliant on it. Then reverse the movement to get back down. Do 2 to 3 sets of 25- to 45-second holds.

The Perfect Handstand: Stand with feet hip-width apart and arms extended overhead. Find a point on the floor about 3 feet in front of you. Fold forward, reaching hands toward that point, kicking your left leg up (for your first couple of times, begin with less of a push than you know it would take to get you all the way up, so you can develop an understanding of what kind of power it takes to get you there). Then immediately follow with right leg, letting legs hover above hips, which are stacked over shoulders, which are stacked over wrists: “Imagine your body is a building where all those major joint intersections are a separate floor but still perfectly stacked to create a balanced unit,” Widerstrom says. Hold as long as you can, then lower one leg at a time to safely return to standing.

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Windshield Wiper

Lying faceup, swipe your legs together left and right in a 180-degree arc. The glitch is that women tend to recruit their legs and hip flexors to do this exercise. “When you release your grip on those wrong muscles to engage the right ones-in this case your core- you can access your full range of mobility and strength, and suddenly this movement becomes so much more accessible and effective for shaping your body,” Widerstrom says. (Master it, then tackle this 10-move oblique workout to test your strength.)

1. Teach your body to move, brake, and change directions fluidly with a barbell twist. Stand with feet together, with an empty barbell (or a broomstick) racked on your back across your shoulder blades, lightly gripping the bar with an overhand grip, elbows bent downward. Keep the torso long and hips square, then rotate torso toward right until you have no further range of motion toward your right side. Switch sides; repeat. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 12 reps, alternating sides.

2. Move your legs as one-but without as much weight-with bent-leg wipers. Lie faceup on floor with arms extended out to sides and knees bent over hips. Keeping legs together at 90 degrees, drop knees toward left, letting your right hip come off the floor, to hover 1 inch above floor. Lift knees to start, then lower them toward right. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 12 reps, alternating sides.

3. Do single-leg wipers to learn how to control the movement in its full range. Lie faceup on floor with arms extended out to sides, right leg extended upward and bent left knee over hips. Keeping knees together, drop legs toward left to hover 1 inch above floor, letting your right hip leave the ground. Lift your legs back the way they came, then lower them toward right. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 12 reps, alternating sides.

The Perfect Windshield Wiper: Lie faceup on floor with arms extended out to sides and legs extended over hips. With ribs pressing into floor and legs together, drop legs toward left as your right hip lifts off the floor, to hover 1 inch above floor. Trace your legs back to start, then lower them toward the right. “As your legs reach away from your core, your body becomes very tight in order to keep you stable and connected to the floor,” Widerstrom says. “Then when your legs come back to center, you feel a brief release of tension.”

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Candlestick Roll

Squat deeply, roll back onto upper back and straighten your legs toward ceiling, roll forward onto feet, squat deeply, and stand again. Do all that without stopping, and you’ve got yourself a candlestick roll. “A candlestick roll fires up and connects every muscle in your core while you go from standing to active to standing again,” Widerstrom says. This gymnastics-inspired exercise tends to be tough because in addition to calling on strength, mobility, and coordination, it requires you to be comfortable moving blindly. “You might be a little scared to travel backward-then when you’re in it, expect it to feel a little weird-but then you get the hang of it and know what to expect,” she says. “It actually starts to become fun, and suddenly you’re great at it.” Go from newbie to pro in three simple steps.

1. Master the rocking position (it’s harder than it looks) by doing a hollow hold. Lie faceup on the floor with arms extended behind head and legs long and squeezing tight together. Pull your abs in tight and press your lower back into the floor, then lift your arms, head, neck, shoulders, and legs 8 to 12 inches off the floor (try to make your body resemble the shape of a rocking chair leg). Hold for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 2 to 3 times.

2. Learn how to use momentum to rock while maintaining the hollow-hold position by weighting each end. Hold one 2- to 5-pound weight with both hands behind your head and the other one between your feet. Start in hollow-hold position, then, without changing the shape of your body, rock back and forth, letting the weight pull you one way and then the other. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 15 reps.

3. Getting up is the hard part, so here are two ways to help you. The beginning is always the same: Stand with feet together, arms reaching forward. Squat all the way down, and when your butt touches the floor, roll back onto upper back, sending legs up and slightly back. If you struggle with mobility, cross your legs on the roll forward to come to standing, while also using your hands to press into the floor on both sides of your hips. If it’s strength you lack, hold a weight in your hands on the roll backward, and push it forward on the way up to help power you to standing. Do 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps.

The Perfect Candlestick Roll: Stand with feet together and arms reaching forward. Squat all the way down, and when your butt touches the floor, roll back, reaching your arms behind head, rolling onto your upper back, letting your straight legs come high over your hips to create momentum. Without pausing, roll forward, bringing your heels as close to your butt as you can while connecting your feet to the floor; reach your arms forward to come back into a low squat to rise to standing. “Think of this movement as a seesaw,” Widerstrom says. “Energy transfers from your feet to your head back to your feet.” So if you’re having trouble making it off the floor, roll back with a little more gusto. (Tackle this gymnastics-inspired workout next to sharpen your skills and challenge your muscles.)

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Pistol Squat

“This deep single-leg squat isn’t given the star power it deserves, so most women just don’t even try it,” Widerstrom says. But the body benefits are well worth the reps: You strengthen each leg independently, which evens out imbalances, and you also build strong, lean muscle from your core on down, Widerstrom says. Here’s how to build up to it.

1. Do pistols using a pole to help lighten your load: Stand on left leg facing pole and grasp it with left hand. Let your palm slide down the pole as you shift your hips back, extend right leg forward, and lower into a single-leg squat with your hip crease well below knee level. Use as little help as you can to stand up. Do 2 sets of 8 to 10 reps per leg.

2. Work on improving your depth by doing a pistol to an elevated seat. Stand about a foot in front of a box or a low bench, facing away from it. Shift weight onto left leg, then bend left leg, sending hips back and down toward the bench while you extend right leg and arms forward. Once your butt touches the bench, straighten left leg to return to standing. Do 2 sets of 8 to 10 reps per leg, lowering the height of the bench or box as you improve.

3. Adding weight to this movement actually makes it easier by counterbalancing the motion, so before you try a body-weight pistol, do a weighted one. Hold one dumbbell (start with 15 pounds; decrease as you get stronger) horizontally with both hands, arms extended forward. Shift weight onto left leg, then send hips back and down as you lower your hips past 90 degrees, while still extending right leg forward. Once you hit below parallel-without lowering right leg-power back up to standing. Do 2 sets of 8 to 10 reps per leg, alternating legs. (Take this on after your daily squat challenge for killer results.)

The Perfect Pistol Squat: Stand on left leg with equal pressure on all sides of your foot, right leg slightly lifted forward. Bend left knee and send hips backward, reaching arms forward as you extend right leg forward, lowering body until hips are below parallel. Then squeeze the glutes and hamstring to stop your descent, and let them act as a spring to bring you back up to standing. “Imagine that you’re pushing your standing leg 6 feet down through the floor,” Widerstrom says. “That will engage the bigger leg muscles and your power center more than just thinking about straightening your knee to stand up.”

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Push-Up

Strictly speaking, your chest should graze the floor each time you lower for a push-up. If you tend to fudge it, you’re not alone. “Our center of mass is our hips,” Widerstrom says. (For men, it’s their chest.) “That’s why our legs are tenacious as hell, but we lack upper-body strength.” The good news is that you can use your more powerful butt and legs to help propel this full-body move. At the same time, build your upper-body strength and dial in that full range of motion with Widerstrom’s three-step progression. (Then tackle this 30-day push-up challenge to perfect it.)

1. To perfect the pressing motion and strengthen your chest and arms, do a barbell bench press (dumbbells won’t cut it here because you move them separately, unlike the floor). Start with an empty bar, then add weight as needed. Lie faceup on a bench with feet flat on the floor. Grab the barbell with an overhand grip with hands shoulder-width apart. Straighten arms above chest to start. Lower bar to graze chest, then press back up. Do 2 to 3 sets of 10 to 15 reps.

2. Incline push-ups get your core involved and take you through the full motion but without all your weight. Do full-range push-ups with your hands on a sturdy bench or box and your feet on the floor. Do 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps.

3. Hand-release push-ups give your body a moment to recover and reset halfway through each rep while also developing your strength out of the bottom of the push-up from a dead stop. Start on floor in plank position. Lower body fully onto floor. Lift hands briefly, then plant them on the floor again and push-up to plank position. Do 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps. “Even my contestants on Biggest Loser with 80- to 100-plus pounds to lose learn how to do real push-ups this way,” she says. “Sometimes they have to peel up from the floor, but it’s much better for their muscles and mechanics than dropping the knees.”

The Perfect Push-Up: Start on floor in plank position with your hands below your shoulders and feet 8 to 12 inches apart (for a strong base). “Imagine you can flip a switch that turns on the muscles from your shoulders, chest, arms, abs, butt to legs,” Widerstrom says. “Visualize lighting up those muscle groups that will carry you through the movement.” Then begin to lower, bending your arms so there’s a 4- to 6-inch space between your elbow and ribcage, to ensure more muscles pitch in. “Bring your chest between your hands instead of lowering your face to your hands, which will allow you to activate more chest muscles.” Once your chest brushes the floor, power back up to plank.

  • By By Jaclyn Emerick

How to stretch your hands and wrists

Wrist pain can be frustrating and inconvenient. It can also make work or basic day-to-day activities, such as using a computer or cooking a meal, more difficult.

Exercises can improve mobility and decrease the chance of injury or reinjury. Wrist stretches are easy to do at home or at the office. When done properly, they can benefit a person’s overall wrist and hand health.

Anyone experiencing chronic pain or pain with numbness should visit a doctor for a thorough diagnosis.

The following stretches can help improve strength and mobility:

Wrist and hand stretches

A person should do the exercises below slowly and gently, focusing on stretching and strengthening. If the stretch hurts, stop.

The following wrist and hand stretches may improve strength and mobility:

1. Raised fist stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Start with your arm up beside your head, with your hand open.
  2. Make a fist, keeping your thumb outside of it.
  3. Slide your fingers toward your wrist until you feel a stretch.

2. Wrist rotations

To do this stretch:

  1. Stretch your arm out in front of you.
  2. Slowly, point the fingers down until you feel a stretch. Use the other hand to gently pull the raised hand toward the body. Hold this position for 3–5 seconds.
  3. Point the fingers toward the ceiling until you feel a stretch. Use the other hand to gently pull the raised hand toward the body. Hold this position for 3–5 seconds.
  4. Repeat this three times.

3. Prayer position

To do this stretch:

  1. Sit with your palms together and your elbows on the table in a prayer position.
  2. Lower the sides of the hands toward the table until you feel a stretch. Keep your palms together. Hold this position for 5–7 seconds.
  3. Relax.
  4. Repeat this three times.

4. Hooked stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Hook one elbow under the other and pull both arms towards the center of the torso. You should feel a stretch in your shoulders.
  2. Wrap one arm around the other so that the palms are touching.
  3. Hold the position for 25 seconds.
  4. Switch arms and repeat it on the other side.

5. Finger stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Bring the pinky and ring fingers together.
  2. Separate the middle and index fingers from the ring finger.
  3. Repeat the stretch 10 times.

6. Fist-opener

To do this stretch:

  1. Make a fist and hold it in front of you.
  2. Stretch your fingers until your hand is flat and open, with the fingers together.
  3. Repeat the movements 10 times.

7. Sponge-squeeze

To do this stretch:

  1. Squeeze a sponge or stress ball, making a fist.
  2. Hold the position for 10 seconds.
  3. Relax.
  4. Repeat this 10 times.

8. Windshield wiper wrist movement

To do this stretch:

  1. Start with your hand face down on a table.
  2. Gently, point the hand to one side as far as it can go without moving the wrist. Hold it there for 3–5 seconds.
  3. Do the same on the other side.
  4. Repeat the movement three times on each side.

9. Thumb pull

To do this stretch:

  1. Grab your thumb with the other hand.
  2. Gently pull the thumb backward, away from the hand.
  3. Hold the stretch for 25 seconds.
  4. Repeat it on the other thumb.

14. Alternate finger stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Bring the middle and ring fingers together.
  2. Separate the pinky and index fingers from them.
  3. Repeat the stretch 10 times.

15. Wrist-strengthener

To do this stretch:

  1. Get into position on your hands and knees, with the fingers pointing toward the body.
  2. Slowly lean forward, keeping your elbows straight.
  3. Hold the position for 20 seconds.
  4. Relax, then repeat the stretch.

Takeaway

Working with computers, writing, and doing manual labor put strain on the hands and wrists and can cause problems over time, such as tendonitis and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Taking frequent breaks and stretching before and while using the hands and wrists can help prevent strain. Improving flexibility and strength gradually can help people avoid wrist and hand injuries.

Top 8 Bodyweight Exercises for Women (+BONUS Sexy & Sweaty Workout)

“I wish my hips were smaller. I want my butt to be more toned. I want to get rid of my lower belly pooch. Why can’t I get rid of these bat wings?” Sound familiar? How many of you ladies out there have ever complained about a specific area you want to improve on your body? I know I have.

The one mistake that women often make is trying to target a specific area of their body with certain machines at the gym that isolate a single muscle group. While this may strengthen the muscle, it does nothing to eliminate the layer of fat covering up the muscle you want to show off. Instead of focusing on that single area, think about increasing your workout intensity to increase overall fat loss and you will get the results you want. For this reason, bodyweight training is ideal.

8 Best Bodyweight Exercises for Women

1. Flat Out Burpee

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms by your sides. Push your hips back, bend your knees and lower your body into a squat. Place your hands on the floor directly in front of you, inside your feet. Jump your feet back and softly land on the balls of your feet in a plank position. Bend your elbows and lower your entire body down to the ground until you are completely flat. Then use your arms to push yourself back up to that plank position and jump your feet forward so they land just outside of your hands. Reach your arms up over your head and jump up into the air. When you land, immediately bend your knees and lower back down into that squatting position for the next repetition.

2. Single Leg Pike Push-Up (left and right side)

Start off in a downward facing dog position. Then extend one leg up towards the sky, keeping your hips square to the floor. Look towards your feet/knee at all times. Bend the elbows and lower down into the push-up position. Aim to get the crown of your head in between your hands as low as you can without tapping your head to the floor. If the single leg is too difficult, you can always keep both feet on the ground for a standard pike push-up.

3. Clap Jacks

Begin with your feet at least shoulder-width apart and your arms in the T position, palms facing forward. Your hands should stay at shoulder height at all times (not higher or lower). Jump your feet together and clap your hands together in front of you (arms remain straight) and then jump back to start and open both your arms and legs again. This is very similar to a jumping jack but with a slightly different arm variation. Stay on the balls of your feet in order to do this exercise as quickly and controlled as possible.

4. Jump Lunges

Start in a lunge position with your right foot in front of the left. Aim to create a 90 degree angle with both legs. Your hands can be on your hips or by your sides. Keep your core engaged, lower down a bit to load that lunge and then explosively jump into the air, switch the legs and land in a lunge with the left foot in front. Try to complete these as quickly & controlled as possible. But safety is always number one. This is an advanced move, so don’t be upset if it takes a while to increase your repetitions. If you feel any pain or need a regression exercise, you can always opt for regular lunges.

5. Overhead Squats

Stand with your feet between hip and shoulder-width apart. Toes are facing forward. Reach your arms up overhead, palms facing each other, biceps by your ears. Perform a squat while keeping your arms up overhead. Be sure to keep your core engaged and chest up to avoid leaning too far forward. Note: The degree to which you can reach your arms up overhead and keep your biceps by your ears depends on the flexibility of your shoulders. If this is uncomfortable for you, feel free to bend your elbows and create a goal post shape with your arms instead.

6. Push-Up Side Plank

Start in a push-up position and complete one push-up repetition (knee push-ups are also okay). Then open up to a high side plank on the right side and then on the left side. Be sure that the hand on the ground is directly underneath the shoulder. Additionally, note that the hand that is in the air has its palm facing forward and is reaching up towards the sky – not back. If you reach your hand back, you could lose your balance and fall backwards.This move is excellent for the upper body and core! Note: You can keep your feet slightly apart for this move so it makes it easier to pivot the feet into the side plank. If you are more advanced, you can keep the feet together and stack them on top of each other during the side plank. Let’s see how you do!

7. Wide Climber Jumps

Start out in a high plank (on your hands) position. Be sure that your hands are directly underneath your shoulders and your entire body is engaged. With some momentum, bring your right foot towards the outside of your right hand (everyone’s range of motion will be different). Then jump your right foot back to start while simultaneously jumping your left foot towards the outside of your left hand. Try to keep moving as quickly and controlled as possible. Make sure that your shoulder blades don’t squeeze together. Really push the middle part of your upper back towards the sky to keep a solid foundation for your upper body.

8. Up-Downs

How can you incorporate all these exercises into a great workout? Well, I am glad you asked because I have created a Sexy & Sweaty Workout for you that should take between 15-30 minutes to complete. Perform each exercise for 30 seconds. Do them one after the other with little or no rest in between. After you have finished all the exercises, rest for 1-2 minutes and repeat for 3-5 rounds.

So, what do you say? Are you ready to give bodyweight training a try?

All of these exercises can be found in the Results app. And if you’re looking for a 12-week personalized training plan full of bodyweight training workouts like this, download the Results app now.

***

The 12 Best Bodyweight Workouts for Women

Tone up anytime, anywhere with these 12 equipment-free, at home workouts for women. Whether you’re sweating at home, in the gym, or in a hotel room on-the-go, these body weight exercises are sure to build lean muscle and burn calories.

Previously seen on Nourish Move Love — updated to include new workouts and make this post more user-friendly!

With the warmer temps come more outdoor runs, green smoothies and iced coffees, and a season of travel for my family. A combination of my husband’s beach volleyball schedule and family trips to the lake means that we spend a lot of time on-the-go in the summer.

Being the fairly scheduled, type-A person that I am, I love my routines. I know how tough it can be to keep travel from derailing your fitness goals. Which is why I love having a variety of body weight exercises in fitness routine — no excuses, you can literally workout anywhere with just your bodyweight.

I talked about this in my ‘Morning Routine‘ post, but I think it’s worth mentioning again: habit > willpower. If you’re relying on willpower to get you to the gym every morning, you have to consciously make that choice every single day — which is exhausting! Once you create a habit that decision is no longer a choice you have to make; it’s an automatic habit.

I’ve found that starting my day with a good sweat session is an essential part of my routine, and I do my best to stick to it, even when I’m traveling.

Sometimes that means finding a nearby gym, or going for a run along the beach. But most of the time, I rely on bodyweight exercises.

So I’ve rounded up a dozen of my favorite total body, bodyweight workouts that you can do anytime, anywhere.

My mission has always been about fitting fitness into your daily life. Whether you’re sweating on-the-go, or working out at home and not ready to invest in workout equipment yet, bodyweight workouts are always a great option. And just as effective for weight loss and raising your heart rate as gym equipment.

I’ve included some full-length, follow-along-style videos below if that’s your jam! Otherwise, there are workout options you can screenshot and work off of at your own pace.

What’s the benefit of doing a bodyweight workout?

According to the American College of Sports Medicine, bodyweight training is one of the top 5 trends for fitness professionals in 2019. That’s right, it’s back to basics! I think a common misconception about bodyweight moves is that they can’t function as strength moves — but with the proper form and intention, they can!

In fact, Mayo Clinic has found that a bodyweight workout can be an effective form of strength training, and is a good addition to fitness programs.

I also think it’s important to say this: the best workout is one you’re going to actually do. I’m a big fan of a good bodyweight workout for that reason alone — it’s hard to find excuses to skip your workout when you don’t need any equipment or a fancy gym to get it done.

Home Workouts: 12 Bodyweight Workouts for Women

  • 15-Minute HIIT Cardio Workout
  • 10 Ways to Sculpt Your Arms Without Weights
  • 15-Minute Power Yoga
  • 15-Minute HIIT Pyramid Workout

20-Minute Bodyweight Workouts

  • Beginner HIIT Cardio Yoga
  • 6 Glute-Toning Barre Moves
  • Barre Legs + Cardio Tabata
  • 20-Minute Bodyweight Tabata Workout

30-Minute Bodyweight Workouts

  • Back to Basics: Bodyweight Strength + HIIT Workout
  • 30-Minute No-Running Cardio Workout
  • Cardio + Abs Bodyweight Workout
  • 10/20/30 Yoga HIIT AMRAP

BONUS Bodyweight Workouts

I believe the best way to explore a new city if you’re traveling, is to train it. That means, taking your traveling workouts outdoors so I also love these traveling workouts:

  • 30-Minute Bodyweight Bench HIIT Workout {all you need is a park bench}
  • 35-Minute Outdoor Run + Strength Workout
  • 15-Minute Stair Climbing Cardio Circuit Workout {all you need is a set of stairs}
  • 30-Minute Run + Tone Stroller Workout {for all my mamas traveling with littles}

And if you’re currently pregnant like me, this 10-Minute Mommy Workout is bodyweight prenatal workout favorite!

10 Equipment-Free Moves for Your Upper Body

When we think of arm exercises, we think curls and triceps extensions, but there are so many more moves to build muscle. In fact, there’s a whole host of arm moves that require no equipment, (maybe just a sturdy overhead bar).

By virtue of their supportive nature, bodyweight moves tend to activate the abdominal and lower back muscles. This is a win-win when primarily targeting your arms.

Bodyweight training is when a person uses the weight of his or her body to provide resistance. Bodyweight exercises range from basic moves like a push-up to more advanced “flows” that incorporate several movements into one.

For people that think bodyweight training doesn’t get you strong, look no further than gymnasts and calisthenics athletes. The benefits of bodyweight training include the fact that it’s specific to your body’s size, it strengthens several muscles at once, develops muscular endurance, improves body control, and there’s less injury risk compared to free weights.

To increase the intensity of bodyweight exercises, you can increase the number of repetitions or change the movement to make it offer more resistance, such as elevating the feet during a push-up.

Try these ten bodyweight upper body exercises to sculpt your arms, shoulders, and core—mostly those guns, though.

Close Grip Push-up

How to do it: Get into a narrow plank position with your palms flat on the floor about six inches apart, toes pointed to the ground, and body in a straight line. this is the starting position.

Keeping your elbows tight to your body, lower yourself towards the ground until your chest touches or nearly touches the ground. Extend your arms against the ground to push yourself back into the starting position; that’s one rep.

Trainer Tip: The narrow grip targets the triceps more than a wider grip, which hits the chest muscles first. Beginners should do these while kneeling on a mat.

Looking to strength train? View our Aaptiv workouts here.

Dolphin Push-up

How to do it: Get into a downward dog position where your palms are flat on the ground, legs straight and toes on the ground.

Your back should form a “V” shape and your head hangs down between your shoulders looking between your legs; this is the starting position. Bend both elbows towards the ground and touch the floor with your forearms.

Now, push yourself back into the downward dog position so that your forearms are off the ground; that’s one rep. Do two to three sets for eight to ten reps.

Trainer Tip: This move targets the triceps. If it’s too hard, do a downward dog into a cobra pose, aka vinyasa flow.

Bear Crawl

How to do it: From the top of the standard push-up position, step the right foot forward inside of your right palm. The right foot should not be outside of the right arm.

Next, move the left hand forward in front of you. Now, switch sides by stepping forward with the left leg inside of the left palm and gain ground with your right hand. Keep your hips as low as possible through this exercise. Continue this for 50 yards.

Trainer Tip: This isn’t a gallop where your hips are high and you’re just trying to cover ground. Pretend like you’re crawling underneath a wall or barbed wire to keep yourself low to the ground. The crawl works the entire body, especially the shoulders.

Batwing

How to do it: Lie on your back with legs straight, bottoms of heels on the ground and arms extended towards the ceiling; this is the starting position.

Row both arms towards the ground with elbows tight to the body and push your triceps into the ground, causing your upper back to come off the ground; relax your head here.

Keeping pushing off your elbows and triceps until your shoulder blades are almost touching and there are a few inches between the back and the ground. Straighten your arms again above your torso; that’s one rep.

Trainer Tip: This is one of the few purely bodyweight back exercises. You should feel your rear deltoids and upper back muscles start to fatigue after three sets of ten reps. When bringing the arms towards the ground, grab the air and create tension in the biceps.

Triceps Dip

How to do it: Sit on the floor with arms extended, palms on the floor behind you and at your sides, and knees bent at 90 degrees. The direction of your palms depends on how you’re comfortable, but most prefer the wrist slightly rotated out.

Raise your hips off the ground and tighten your core; this is the starting position. Bend your elbows and lower your body towards the ground until you feel the tension in your triceps. Straighten your arms and return to the starting position.

Trainer Tip: To increase difficulty, straighten legs so only the bottoms of the heels are on the ground. You can also place your hands on a raised platform like a sturdy chair or box. The goal is to increase the muscular endurance of the triceps and shoulders. Do three sets of 15-20 reps.

Cuban Press

How to do it: Stand with feet shoulder width apart, arms straight down at sides with palms facing down and spine straight; this is the starting position. Do an upright row by pulling your arms straight up towards your chin while keeping the elbows tucked to the sides.

Don’t shrug the shoulders, curl your arms, or swing your body. At the highest position, your elbows should be level with your shoulders. Now, flip the wrists up and back so that it looks like you’re ready to press something overhead; this is position two.

Now, do a bodyweight overhead press by extending the arms straight towards the ceiling, bringing your hands together, separating them, and returning to position two. Lastly, lower the arms back down to the starting position.

Trainer Tip: This move really builds shoulder strength and endurance. After three sets of eight reps, you’ll feel the burn. If you do want to try it with dumbbells, all you’ll need is five to 15 pounds maximum.

Don’t fly through the exercise. Take five seconds to get to position two, then another five seconds to complete the press, and another five seconds to return to start.

Biceps Curl

How to do it: Stand with feet shoulder with apart, back straight, shoulders back, arms at your sides and palms facing forward. Engage your abdominal muscles.

Make a fist and bring your wrists toward your upper chest, keeping the arms at the sides, stopping when you feel maximum tension on the biceps. Squeeze the biceps at the top for three seconds then slowly (take ten seconds) bring both arms back down to the sides simultaneously; that’s one.

Trainer Tip: The slow nature of the negative (lowering) portion creates a better muscle growth stimulus compared to lowering the arms quickly. Try three to four sets of ten to 12 reps. Use resistance bands or a suspension trainer to increase intensity.

Eccentric Chin-up

How to do it: Grab a sturdy overhead structure, like a pull-up bar, with hands at shoulder width and palms facing you (supinated grip).

Hang from the bar with arms extended, shoulder blades pushed back, chest up, and core tight. Use your back and biceps to pull your body up until your chin is over the bar. Take five seconds to lower yourself down to the hang position; that’s one rep.

Trainer Tip: Again, the slow negative or eccentric portion stimulates the growth of the biceps here. If you can’t do chin-ups or pull-ups, do an inverted row from a bar set up about four feet from the ground.

Position yourself underneath a sturdy bar like a Smith machine or barbell in a squat rack, grab bar, and pull your chest towards it. Aim for three sets of five reps for the chin-ups or rows.

Seal Walk

How to do it: Get into a straight arm plank position with core engaged and body in a straight line. Place a five-pound plate, sliding disc, or a paper plate on the floor under your toes; this is the starting position. Walk your body forward by moving one arm forward at a time and letting your feet drag along the sliding object.

Trainer Tip: Although you may feel this move most in your shoulders and triceps, it also greatly activates the abdominal muscles. Contract your glutes, hamstrings, and thighs to work your legs, too. Aim to travel 30 yards then turn around and come back; do six total trips.

Towel Wring

How to do it: Hold a thick towel with both hands a few inches away from the ends. Twist the towel repeatedly until it gets so tight it can no longer be twisted. Twist the towel in the other direction until it can’t be twisted anymore. Do this for three sets of ten reps in each direction.

Trainer Tip: Make this harder by wetting the towel and wringing out the water, then, wetting the towel and wringing it out in the other direction. The forearms and fingers get a workout with this move.

Work these equipment-free exercises into your Aaptiv routine when you can’t get to the gym, are traveling, or need a quick upper body workout.

Mark Barroso is an NSCA-CPT and Spartan SGX Coach.

With bodyweight exercises, there’s no excuse for not building your dream physique. After all, when your training bodyweight, you don’t need to dedicate hours to the squat rack or suffer through endless reps on the weights bench. You don’t even need a gym membership. All you need to achieve the body you’ve been dreaming of is, well, your body.

But bodyweight workouts aren’t just easy to do; they’re also extremely effective. A study published in the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health and Fitness Journal found that bodyweight training is an efficient way to decrease body fat, improve VO2 max and boost muscular fitness. “As the hectic pace of today’s corporate world continues to infringe on the amount of time individuals have for exercise, these types of programmes can offer a good option to help busy individuals improve their health and recover from stress via exercise,” the study’s authors claim.

Knowing that, we expect you’ll want to find out which moves are best, right? Well, we’ve collected the best bodyweight exercises and workouts, so you can carve a perfect body whenever, wherever.

The Benefits of Bodyweight Exercises

To find out why you should put down the dumbbells and give bodyweight training a go, we spoke with Bobby Windebank, personal trainer at Sweat It, who explained why training your body using just your body is beneficial.

1. Bodyweight Workouts are Accessible

“Bodyweight training can be modified for whatever fitness level you are,” says Windebank. “Whether you’re starting at zero and trying to do one press-up or you’re a seasoned athlete, bodyweight exercises can be incredibly challenging and beneficial. Progressing the exercises is also very straightforward, so you can keep challenging yourself and building strength.”

2. Bodyweight Workouts Will Increase Your Mobility and Stability

“We were born to move, and mobility and stability are an essential part of the way we move and life in general,” Windebank explains. “Weightlifting can have many positive effects on your body, but it can also limit your mobility. The movements involved in bodyweight training can help to increase that mobility and challenge the bodies ‘stabilisers’ by using complete movements. This can in turn, lead to strength gains in the gym.”

3. Bodyweight Workouts are Brilliant for Developing Technique and Injury Prevention

“Bodyweight training is a great way to really hone your technique and form,” says Windebank. “Weightlifting can take a serious toll on your body and in particular, your joints. With bodyweight training, the stress on your joints is lower, so you’re less likely to pick up an injury that could hamper your long term training.”

4. Bodyweight Workouts Can Be Quick and Easy

“These days, everybody is time poor, so finding quick, effective workouts is essential,” Windebank expains. “Fortunately, bodyweight training doesn’t require a dedicated gym and uses minimal equipment, so you can fit in a workout whenever you have some spare time, wherever you are. Bodyweight training also allows you to combine cardio and strength training, meaning you can smash that workout in the most efficient way.”

Can You Build Muscle with Bodyweight Exercises?

Those benefits are all well and good, but if you can’t build real, tangible, bursting-through-your-t-shirt muscle with bodyweight exercises then what’s the point? Well, you’ll be pleased to know, bodyweight exercises are just as good as throwing around weights when it comes to muscle hypertrophy (or getting stacked to you and me).

Research published in Physiology & Behavior showed that muscle growth “can occur independent of an external load,” and, in fact, all it takes to get swole is performing exercises through their full range of motion. A bodyweight squat, performed with immaculate technique, can be just as effective as traditional weight training methods, and, when it comes to building muscle, there’s really no need to keep adding more and more weight to your barbell.

The 10 Best Bodyweight Exercises for Building Muscle

So you know that you can build muscle with bodyweight exercises, but which exercises should you make staples of your workout? We’ve collected the 10 best bodyweight exercises, each of which are capable of giving you a full-body workout that guys throwing tin around in a gym somewhere can only dream of.

1. Press-ups

How to do the exercise

  • Set up with your weight supported on your toes and hands beneath your shoulders, body straight.
  • Take care to keep your core locked so a straight line forms between your head, glutes and heels.
  • Lower your body until your chest is an inch from the ground then explosively drive up by fully extending your arms.

Why

Pressed for time? Perform 20 reps of this classic blubber-burner. “This age-old exercise activates every muscle in your body when performed correctly,” says Frost. And how do you get it right? “Just ensure your hands are an equal distance apart and directly underneath your shoulders. Squeeze your glutes and abs too. That’ll create body tension to maximise efficiency during the execution of the exercise.”

2. Step-up with Knee Raises

How to do the exercise

  • Place a bench or a box in front of you and step onto it with one foot.
  • As you plant your foot, drive with your other foot bringing your knee up as high as you can. Lower it back down and step back onto the floor.
  • Repeat on the other side.

Why

Whether you’ve noticed a slight muscle imbalance in your pins or you’re simply trying to carve some serious lower-body strength, stop fretting: this is the move for you.

“Unilateral (single leg) training can help strengthen stabilising muscles and can be used to even out imbalances,” says Frost. Your left side weaker than your right? Give it a leg up by dedicating an extra 15 reps to your frailer pin.

3. Groiners

How to do the exercise

  • Start the exercise in a press-up position.
  • Jump forward so both legs land next to your hands.
  • Return to starting position.

Why

Horrible name, brilliant warm-up exercise. Opening up your hips and thoracic region massively increases your body’s range of movement (the distance the muscle extends and contracts during an exercise), according to Frost. So what? Well, perform these exercises through a larger ROM and you’ll garner significant extra muscle growth from your workout, according to The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

But that’s not all. This dynamic stretch also pumps blood to almost all the muscles in your lower-body, drastically decreasing your risk of injury from overstrain while upping your heart rate for the next muscle-building moves.

4. Spider crawl

How to do the exercise

  • From a press-up position, raise one foot off the floor and bring your knee up towards your elbow.
  • Pause then return to the starting position and repeat on the other side.
  • Make sure to crunch your core at the top of the rep to bring your knee even closer to your elbow and get more out of your abs.

Why

Want to sculpt a superhero physique? This primitive movement crushes your core while also targeting your legs, arms, chest and shoulders (yup, all at once).

5. Standing Long Jump

How to do the exercise

  • Lower yourself into a squat position with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Swing your arms back and use them to propel yourself forward.
  • Bring your legs forward for additional momentum.
  • Jump as far as you can and land on the soles of your feet.

Why

Want more mass combined with true explosive strength? Deploy the standing long jump, says Frost. The reason: this move targets your body’s all-important fast-twitch muscle fibres.

Unlike small slow-twitch fibres (the ones geared towards endurance) your fast-twitch muscle fibres are used in fast power-packed movements, meaning they’re much bigger. Cast your bullseye on them if you’re looking to upgrade the power in your pins. Or simply want them looking bigger in time for shorts weather.

6. Burpees

How to do the exercise

  • Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and squat down until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • From the bottom of the squat, place your hands on the floor and kick your legs out behind you into a press-up position.
  • Push up until your arms are straight and then tuck in your legs at the bottom of the squat position.
  • Drive upwards through your heels until you are six inches off the floor and then repeat.

Why

By activating muscles almost everywhere on your body, the burpee will give you a massive calorie burn due to the enormous effort required.

Not sure when to try this bodyweight goliath? “Try throwing them in between strength sets or part of a basic bodyweight circuit,” suggests Frost. Just know that wherever you fit them in, they’re still not going to get any easier.

Can you perform 40 press-ups without breaking? Then you’re ready for this advanced muscle-builder

7. Handstand Wall Walk

How to do the exercise

  • Position yourself in a handstand position with your feet planted against a wall.
  • Move your hands forward and walk down the wall until you reach the bottom.

Why

Can you perform 40 press-ups without breaking? Then you’re ready for this advanced muscle-builder, says Frost: “The handstand walk will challenge your entire posterior and anterior chain . For me, that’s why they’re one of the best bodyweight moves on the planet.”

But there’s one question you should ask before attempting this Insta-friendly exercise: what’s the best way to do it without landing on your head? Answer: “Squeeze your abs and glutes so you are maintaining a straight line during the handstand,” says Frost.

8. Wide-grip Pull-ups

How to do the exercise

  • Grab the bar with your palms facing away from you and your arms fully extended.
  • Your hands should be as wide as you can comfortably get them.
  • Squeeze your shoulder blades together, exhale and drive your elbows towards your hips to bring your chin above the bar.
  • Lower under control back to the start position.

Why

Sure, normal pull-ups are great back-builders. So why not bring your shoulders into the equation too? Wide-grip pulls-ups are the perfect lat attacker, ramping up the effort needed for every rep compared to your normal pull-up.

And there’s a simple secret to getting the most from this move: form. Keep tension in your glutes throughout the move to keep your body straight and muscles injury-free, says Frost. Easy squeezy.

9. Frozen V-sit

How to do the exercise

  • Lie down on your back with your arms and legs outstretched and your hands and feet lifted just above the floor.
  • Begin the exercise by simultaneously raising your torso and legs up to touch your feet.
  • Hold for five to 10 seconds.

Why

Searching for your six-pack? Take your time, says Frost: “Abdominal exercises should not be rushed; you need to perform them with control to maximise the strength benefits.” And if you want to activate more of your core’s muscle under even more tension then you should trade in crunches for V-sits.

Make sure your shoulder blades don’t roll forwards. This will keep your back straight and help you get the most out of the exercise, advises Frost.

10. Single Leg Glute Bridge

How to do the exercise

  • Lie on your back with one leg raised in the air.
  • Thrust forward and raise your hips off the ground as high as you can.
  • Slowly lower yourself to the floor.
  • Clench your glutes at the top of the rep to activate more muscle fibres and see greater growth.

Why

As well as shredding your legs, the single leg glute bridges will challenge your entire posterior chain (your backside muscles). And why should a butt-building muscle move make its way into your next workout? “Building strength on your behind improves your posture, relieving any prolonged back pain,” says Frost. Lesson learnt: if you’re feeling sore after your 9-5 then beat away back pain with 10 reps of this move.

And if you’re aiming for a larger lower-body then make sure to perform this exercise with complete control, squeezing your working glute at the top of each repetition as hard as possible. “Once you’ve managed that you can challenge yourself further by placing a barbell across your hips,” advises Frost.

The Full-body Bodyweight Workout

So now you know the best bodyweight exercises, but what good are exercises without a workout to get the most out of them? Well, never fear because we have two bodyweight workouts for you to choose from, the first of which is designed to work your whole body.

Our full-body circuit has been formulated to build strength, while the short rest times mean you’re also burning extra calories. Do all the moves in order, three times a week, with a day off between each go. You’ll be a leaner, stronger and richer man for it.

Sets: 3

Reps: 14

Rest: 30 secs

How to: Stand with your feet in a narrow stance and lift one leg off the floor. Bend your standing knee to squat down as low as you can while keeping your back straight. Push back up to the start position through your heel, then switch legs and repeat. That’s one rep.

Burpee

Sets: 3

Reps: 20

Rest: 30 secs

How to: From a standing position squat down until your thighs are parallel to the floor and place your palms on the floor. From there kick your feet back as far as you can while keeping your arms extended. As soon as your feet land jump them back in towards your hands, then jump up into the air. Land and immediately squat down to go into the next rep.

Handstand Wall Walk

Sets: 3

Reps: 10m high

Rest: 30 secs

How to: Position yourself in a handstand position with your feet planted against a wall. Move your hands forward and walk down the wall until you reach the bottom.

Spaceman Jump

Sets: 3

Reps: 30 secs

Rest: 30 secs

How to: With your feet shoulder width apart, sink down then push up explosively off your right foot to launch your body to the left, landing on your left foot. Sink as you land and immediately push off in the opposite direction. That’s one rep.

Standing Long Jump

Sets: 3

Reps: 8

Rest: 30 secs

How to: Lower yourself into a squat position with your feet shoulder-width apart. Swing your arms back and use them to propel yourself forward, then bring your legs forward for additional momentum. Jump as far as you can and land on the soles of your feet.

Side Planks

Sets: 3

Reps: 4

Rest: 30 secs

How to: Lie on your left side with your knees straight and prop your upper body up to take its weight on your forearm. Brace your core and raise your hips until your body forms a straight line. Hold this position while breathing deeply. Then roll over and repeat on the other side.

Bench Dips

Sets: 3

Reps: 12

Rest: 60 secs

How to: Stand facing away from a bench, grab it with both hands at shoulder-width. Extend your legs out in front of you. Slowly lower your body by flexing at the elbows until your arm at forearm create a 90 degree angle. Using your triceps lift yourself back to the starting position.

The Bodyweight Six-pack Builder

Our second bodyweight workout is designed to specifically target your abs. It’s only 3-moves long, but what it lacks in length it more than makes up for in effectiveness. Consider this your ultimate bodyweight abs finisher.

Reverse Crunch

Complete all four exercises and then take 2mins rest.

Repeat the circuit five times.

Sets: 5

Reps: 60 secs

Rest: 0 secs

How to: Lie on your back with your arms on the floor at your sides, palms facing down. Bend your knees and bring them towards your chest by contracting your abs. As they rise, roll your pelvis to lift your hips off the floor. Squeeze at the top then slowly lower until your thighs are perpendicular to the floor.

Sit-up

Sets: 5

Reps: 60 secs

Rest: 0 secs

How to: Lie down on the floor with your knees bent and, if possible, hook your feet under something that will prevent them from moving. Place your hands behind your head and tense your core as you lift your torso up so your upper body forms a V shape with your thighs. Lower under control back to the start position.

Mountain Climber

Sets: 5

Reps: 60 secs

Rest: 120 secs

How to: Set up on the floor as though in a sprinter’s blocks, with one foot positioned beneath your waist and one back, with your leg straight. Explosively swap foot positions. Repeat for the prescribed reps.

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Here are the 42 best bodyweight exercises you can do to build muscle and burn fat, no gym required!

These are the exact exercises we start our coaching clients on and I’m pumped to share them with you today!

Have your Nerd Fitness Coach create a bodyweight workout you can do anywhere! Learn more here:

We’ve organized the exercises by major muscle groups (click to jump to those movements):

  • The 11 Best Lower-Body Exercises
  • The 8 Best Upper-Body – Push Exercises
  • The 7 Best Upper-Body – Pull Exercises
  • The 11 Best Core Exercises
  • 5 Full-Body Exercises (Dynamic Movements)
  • How to Build a Bodyweight Workout

Plus, we’ll pull it all together at the end so you can create a complete bodyweight workout routine!

Let’s get to it.

The 11 Best Lower-Body Bodyweight Exercises

You don’t need the gym for “leg day.” Do the following wherever!

#1) ASSISTED BODYWEIGHT SQUAT (if you can’t do regular bodyweight squats):

#2) BODYWEIGHT SQUAT:

If you want even more instruction, here’s how to do a proper bodyweight squat:

#3) ASSISTED PISTOL SQUAT:

#4) PISTOL SQUAT:

#5) SUPPORTED LUNGES:

#6) REGULAR LUNGES:

#7) SINGLE LEG DEADLIFT:

#8) HIP BRIDGE:

#9) CALF RAISE:

#10) STEP UP:

#11) BOX JUMP:

The 8 Best Push Bodyweight Exercises

Let’s walk you through the best bodyweight exercises to train your push muscles. We’ll more or less progress in difficulty as we go.

#1) KNEE PUSH-UP:

#2) ELEVATED PUSH-UP:

#3) PUSH-UP:

We have a whole article on how to do a proper push-up, but we also cover it extensively in this 5 minute video:

#4) DECLINE PUSH-UP:

#5) SIDE-TO-SIDE PUSH-UP:

#6) ASSISTED DIP:

With a resistance band, you can start performing assisted dips. A great exercise while you build up strength for normal dips.

#7) DIP:

Here’s how to do a proper bodyweight dip if you’d like a step-by-step guide.

#8) HANDSTAND (WALL WALK):

The wall walk is a great exercise as you progress into a full handstand. If you’re a complete newbie to turning upside down, check out our guide “Get Your First Handstand” for a full tutorial.

Some of our coaching clients have gotten their first handstand under our watch, which always puts a smile on my face. If you’re interested we’d love to help you too!

Have your Nerd Fitness Coach help you get your first handstand, step-by-step! Learn more here.

The 7 Best Pull Bodyweight Exercises

Don’t neglect your pull muscles when creating your bodyweight workout. Here are the top 7 to include:

#1) INVERTED BODYWEIGHT ROW (HIGH):

An inverted bodyweight row can be a great “pull” exercise if you can’t do a pull-up yet, or if you don’t have a proper pull-up bar nearby. Because a good sturdy table can be used for inverted rows:

#2) INVERTED BODYWEIGHT ROW (LOW):

Once you get comfortable doing an inverted bodyweight row, try going lower to increase the difficulty.

#3) BAR HANG:

#4A) ASSISTED PULL-UPS (WITH BAND):

A resistance band is a great tool to help build strength for proper pull-ups. It’s part of our arsenal for getting your first pull-up.

#4B) ASSISTED PULL-UPS (WITH BOX):

#5) NEGATIVE PULL-UPS:

Once you start to feel confident enough you can do assisted pull-ups and support MOST of your own weight, start looking into negative pull-ups.

Jump and hold yourself above the bar, and then slowly, under control, lower yourself to the ‘starting position’ of a pull-up.

Then repeat!

This is a great way to build up enough strength to eventually get your first pull-up.

#6) PULL-UP:

We have a full guide on proper pull-up form so you can hone in your technique.

#7) CHIN-UPS:

Much like a pull-up, but with your palms facing toward you.

Here’s a video going over proper pull-up and chin-up form:

Want someone to build you a custom made progression plan for doing your first pull-up?

Our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program will do just that, plus your coach can review your movements through our app so you’ll know your training correctly and safely.

You’re not alone on this journey. Let our Online Coaches help you conquer your first pull-up!

The 11 Best Core Bodyweight Exercises

Our next stop on building a bodyweight workout finds us at the core. Here are the 10 best exercises to include:

#1) REVERSE CRUNCH:

#2) KNEE-PLANK:

#3) PLANK:

#4) SIDE PLANK:

#5) HIP BRIDGE HOLD:

#6) HANGING KNEE TUCK:

#7) JUMPING KNEE TUCK:

#8) HOLLOW BODY HOLD:

The hollow body is one of the best ways to engage the midsection and stabilize the body. We utilize the hollow body exercise as part of our strategy for getting your first handstand.

Once you get comfortable holding the position, try…

#9) HOLLOW BODY ROCKING:

#10) KNEES TO ELBOWS:

#11) TOES TO BAR:

5 Dynamic BOdy weight Exercises (Full Body)

Next, we’ll cover some dynamic full-body exercises to get your heart rate roaring during your workout.

#1) WALKING JACKS:

#2) JUMPING JACKS:

#3) STAR JACKS:

#4) BURPEES:

#5) BURPEES WITH PULL-UP (WHAA…):

How to Build a Bodyweight Workout

Alright, it’s time to pull this whole guide together and build a bodyweight workout!

We will pick a bodyweight exercise from each section:

  • Lower Body
  • Upper Body – Push
  • Upper Body – Pull
  • Core
  • Dynamic (Full Body)

We’ll aim for 3 to 4 sets under each category for 8-12 reps.

Plus, we’ll bookend the workout with a dynamic warm-up (DON’T SKIP) and a post-workout stretch.

Your warm-up can look like this:

Your post-workout stretch can look like this:

Example Bodyweight Workout:

  1. Dynamic Warm-Up
  2. Jumping Jacks: 10 reps
  3. Bodyweight Squats: 10 reps
  4. Push-ups: 10 reps
  5. Pull-ups: 10 reps
  6. Reverse Crunch: 10 reps
  7. Repeat 2-6 two more times, for 3 complete circuits.
  8. Post-workout stretch.

Boom!

You now have a bodyweight workout you can do in your own home.

You can mix and match from each category or progress to more difficult moves as you get stronger.

Now, you don’t HAVE to do these exercises at home. You can even do them while exercising around the world, like I did!

If you want to learn all the fine details of building a workout, make sure you check out our extensive guide “How to Build Your Own Workout Routine.“ It’ll walk you through creating a program of bodyweight exercises – or using weights if you want to train in a gym.

Don’t want to bother creating your own bodyweight workout? No problem, I have two options for you:

  • Beginner Bodyweight Workout
  • Advanced Bodyweight Workout

Start at the Beginner workout and move onto the Advanced when it becomes easy.

This should help you get started with a bodyweight training routine. But we hear frequently that people want MORE instruction, MORE guidance, and MORE workouts.

If that’s you, we have MULTIPLE options to take the next step. Pick the option below that best aligns with your goals and timeline:

1) If you want step-by-step guidance, a custom bodyweight training program that levels up as you get stronger, and a coach to keep you accountable, check out our killer 1-on-1 coaching program:

Our coaching program changes lives. Learn how!

2) Good at following instructions? Check out our self-paced online course, the Nerd Fitness Academy.

The Academy has 20+ workouts for both bodyweight or weight training, a benchmark test to determine your starting workout, HD demonstrations of every movement, boss battles, meal plans, a questing system, and supportive community.

Learn more about The Nerd Fitness Academy!

3) Join the Rebellion! We need good people like you in our community, the Nerd Fitness Rebellion.

Sign up in the box below to enlist and get our guide, Strength Training 101: Everything You Need to Know. It’ll help you start incorporating these bodyweight moves into your training.

Download our comprehensive guide STRENGTH TRAINING 101!

  • Everything you need to know about getting strong.
  • Workout routines for bodyweight AND weight training.
  • How to find the right gym and train properly in one.

Alright, your turn: I’d love to hear how your bodyweight training is going!

Did you make your own workout? Try one of ours? Include different moves we didn’t cover today?

Leave a comment below with your results or any questions you have on bodyweight training.

For the Rebellion!

-Steve

PS: I highlighted “42” bodyweight exercises in honor of the late, great Douglas Adams.

Photo source: Deadshot, Laughing Budda, 102, 103, 104, hanging, Wolverine, Yeaaaah…. Surprise ladies!!, acrobat

9 Best Bodyweight Exercises for Size and Strength

Read More >>

Bodyweight exercises are not just for beginners. They’re great for building size and strength. If they’re incorporated efficiently and properly into a workout, you don’t need weights. In addition, they are natural movements that minimize strain on the joints and tendons.

Here are my nine best bodyweight exercises (with videos) for size and strength. Each of these exercises has many progressions. Depending on your fitness level, it’s very easy to modify the movements to make them more challenging.

RELATED: Great Bodyweight Exercises for the Road

1. Push-Ups

Push-Ups are the ultimate upper-body pressing exercise, developing the chest, triceps and shoulders. Variations include the Close-Grip Push-Up, One-Arm Push-Up and Spiderman Push-Up.

To gradually increase the level of difficulty, raise your feet by resting them on a bench (Decline Push-Ups).

Need more of a challenge? Try the variations in the video below.

2. Chin-Ups/Pull-Ups

Just like the Push-Up, the Chin-Up/Pull-Up is one of the most effective upper-body exercises. It works your back and biceps more than any machine or free weight exercise.

Beginners should start with a standard Chin-Up (palms facing you) since the biceps come into play a little more and will support your weight. As you get stronger, advance to Pull-Ups (palms facing away from you) and aim for 10 reps of your body weight. When that becomes too easy, perform the exercise with added weight.

WATCH: Get Stronger Legs With No Equipment

3. Dips

Dips are one of the best exercises for chest, triceps and shoulders.

For a chest focus, lean forward slightly with your upper body. For a triceps focus, keep your upper body upright. When performing dips, keep tension on your muscles by staying in control on the lowering part of the exercise. A good number of reps to shoot for is 15-20 with your body weight.

4. Muscle-Ups

Muscle-Ups work almost every single upper-body muscle. They require a significant amount of upper-body pulling and pushing strength, as well as core stabilization.

Because they’re a little more challenging than other bodyweight exercises, Muscle-Ups take a lot of determination and strength to master. Practice until you can do at least 5 reps.

Here’s a how-to video for beginners:

5. Inverted Rows

Inverted Rows develop the mid- and upper-back muscles. They’re harder to perform than they look. They can be performed on a bar, suspension strap, rings, or even ropes. Just like with Push-Ups, you can increase the level of difficulty by adjusting the height of your feet.

Another way to challenge yourself is by adjusting your grip. An overhand grip will increase the difficulty of the exercise compared to an underhand grip.

6. Pistol Squats

No barbell or dumbbell available? No problem.

Pistol Squats work every muscle in the lower body while also improving balance. When you do these with a full range of motion, you work your quads, hamstrings and glutes.

This is a difficult exercise and might cause some pain if not done properly; Practice with a TRX suspension cable first. Twelve to 15 reps on each side is a good goal.

7. Hip Thrusts

Hip thrusts work the hamstrings and glutes intensely, which is essential for any athlete who requires tremendous power work.

Start by setting up your shoulders and upper back on a bench, and place your feet on the ground or an elevated surface. Let your hips drop as low as you can, then drive your heels off the ground while squeezing your glutes as hard as you can. Hold the top of the movement for about two seconds, then lower your hips back down to perform another rep.

RELATED: The Bedroom Bodyweight Workout

8. Pike Roll Outs

If you could only pick one core exercise to do for the rest of your life, this is the one. It combines a stability ball pike with a rollout to activate both the upper and lower abs, as well as the obliques. Unlike regular Crunches, this exercise completely leaves out the hip flexors and lower back. In other words, your abs are isolated much more effectively compared to other exercises.

9. L-Sits

Great for developing core strength, these also add a little upper-body work. L-Sits also develop your strength for exercises such as Dips. Use dumbbells or parallel bars.

Hold the position for 10 seconds.

WATCH: The Most Insane Bodyweight Workout You’ve Ever Seen

Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Want to get strong but hate the gym?

No problem!

With today’s Advanced Bodyweight Routine, you can burn fat, build muscle, and get a great workout in! All with no gym membership required!

Click the sections below to get right into the action:

  • Advanced Bodyweight Workout Video
  • 21 Best Advanced Bodyweight Exercises
  • How to scale your bodyweight workout
  • What’s next after the Advanced Bodyweight Workout?

You might have come to this article through our Beginner Bodyweight Workout; if so, welcome!

If you didn’t, I’d recommend starting there before moving onto this routine, because this is uber-advanced and designed for nerds looking for a brutally difficult challenge.

We create customized bodyweight workout routines just like this one for the clients in our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program. If you’re looking to have a Yoda on your phone guiding you every step of the way towards your goals, we got you!

Your coach can create a custom bodyweight routine for you. Learn how!

The Advanced Bodyweight Workout

This is the Advanced Bodyweight Workout (Do 3 Circuits):

  • 10 One-Legged Squats – each side
  • 20 Bodyweight Squats
  • 20 Walking Lunges (10 each leg)
  • 20 Jump Step-Ups (10 each leg)
  • 10 Pull-Ups (or inverted bodyweight rows using your kitchen table)
  • 10 Dips – Bar Stools
  • 10 Chin-Ups (or inverted bodyweight rows with underhand grip)
  • 10 Push-Ups
  • 30 Second Plank

See our section below on advanced bodyweight exercises to see how to do each of these movements!

I do use a door-frame pull-up bar in the video, but you can do table bodyweight rows (see the video below) if you can’t do a pull-up yet or if you don’t have a pull-up bar!

Lastly: this workout will have you sweating like a pig and leave you sore all over the next day.

If you’re just moving beyond the Beginner Bodyweight Workout for the first time, this workout might seem ridiculously difficult, which is fine.

The goal will be to go through as many circuits as you can without breaking form.

“WHAT IS A ‘CIRCUIT’?”

In a circuit routine, you’ll do each exercise in succession without a break in between (if you’re able).

  • Once you’ve finished all exercises in the circuit, do it again.
  • If you’re still able after the 2nd run through, go for a 3rd.
  • Because all of these exercises come one after another, you’re bound to get tired – that’s okay!

Our goal is to give you a full-body workout that leaves you panting.

“HOW LONG SHOULD A BODYWEIGHT WORKOUT LAST?”

Go at your own pace, but the above 3 circuits and your warm-up and cool down will take you about 25-30 minutes.

And speaking of warming up and cooling down…

Before you start, do a WARM-UP:

Don’t forget to warm up. You can run in place, jump rope, do a few push-ups, pedal on a stationary bike, jog up and down your stairs, etc. Since we are doing advanced movements here, the warm-up becomes even more critical.

Also, if you want to stretch and cool down after your workout, here’s a routine you can run through:

If you are following this bodyweight workout plan because you’re trying to get in great shape without needing a gym, you might be interested in our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program.

We create custom workout programs for each person that fits their personality, level of experience, and goals. It’s pretty epic, and people are seeing incredible results!

Learn how a NF Coach can help you level up your life!

The 21 Best Advanced Bodyweight Exercises

Let’s go through each movement in the Advanced Bodyweight Workout Circuit, so we can ensure you’re doing each move correctly!

1) BODYWEIGHT SQUAT

If you want even more instruction, here’s how to do a proper bodyweight squat:

2) ASSISTED ONE LEGGED SQUAT

3) ONE LEGGED SQUAT (PISTOL SQUAT)

4) WALKING LUNGE

5) JUMP STEP-UPS

6) ASSISTED PULL-UPS (WITH BAND)

A resistance band is a great tool to help build strength for proper pull-ups. It’s part of our arsenal for getting your first pull-up.

7) NEGATIVE PULL-UPS

If you don’t have a resistance band, you can do negative pull-ups instead. Jump and hold yourself above the bar, and then slowly, under control, lower yourself to the ‘starting position’ of a pull-up. Then repeat!

This is a great way to build up enough strength to eventually get your first pull-up.

8) PULL-UP

We have a full guide on proper pull-up form so you can hone in your technique.

9) CHIN-UPS

Much like a pull-up, but with your palms facing toward you.

Here’s a video going over proper pull-up and chin-up form:

If you can’t do pull-ups or chin-ups, you have another option…

10) INVERTED BODYWEIGHT ROW (OVERHAND)

An inverted bodyweight row can be a great “pull” exercise if you can’t do a pull-up yet, or if you don’t have a proper pull-up bar nearby. Because a good sturdy table can be used for inverted rows:

11) INVERTED BODYWEIGHT ROW (UNDERHAND)

12) ASSISTED BODYWEIGHT DIPS

With a resistance band, you can start performing assisted dips. A great exercise while you build up strength for normal dips.

13) BODYWEIGHT DIPS

14) KNEE PUSH-UP

15) ELEVATED PUSH-UP

16) REGULAR PUSH-UP

We have a whole article on how to do a proper push-up, but we also cover it extensively in this 5 minute video:

17) DECLINE PUSH-UPS

18) KNEE PLANK

19) PLANK

20) SIDE PLANK

21) JUMPING JACKS

Note: We have helped hundreds of 1-on-1 Coaching clients get started with bodyweight training and helped TONS of people get their first pull-up too. We check every client’s exercise form via video to make sure they have the confidence they’re training correctly and making progress!

Have a NF Coach build you a workout and review your form!

How to Scale Your Bodyweight Routine

As I said earlier, this whole routine is scalable based on your ability. For example, here is a sample routine for somebody who has conquered the Beginner Bodyweight Workout but can’t do the full routine above:

  • 10 Bodyweight Squats
  • 10 Walking Lunges
  • 15 Jump Ups
  • 3 Assisted Pull-Ups (or 6 inverted bodyweight rows – overhand grip on table)
  • 8 Dips (or 10 decline push-ups if these are too tough)
  • 3 Assisted Chin-Ups (or 6 inverted body weight rows – underhand grip on table)
  • 10 Push-Ups
  • 30 Second Plank
  • 30 Jumping Jacks

“WHAT IF THE ADVANCED BODYWEIGHT WORKOUT IS TOO EASY FOR ME?”

Hm, well then, can you do 4 circuits instead of 3? Or have you tried a circuit that would make you worthy of a Spartan?

Whatever your fitness level, find a way to push yourself a little harder, get better, be faster, and grow stronger.

It’s a message we really strike home in our guide on Tracking Your Fitness Progress. Keep track of your exact routine, how long it took you, which exercises wore you out, exactly how many reps you did, etc.

Then make sure you do more next time!

“HOW OFTEN SHOULD I DO THE ADVANCED BODYWEIGHT WORKOUT?”

Do this routine 2-3 times a week, but never on consecutive days. It’s a message we really strike home in our guide, “How Often Should I Work Out?”

You don’t build muscle when you’re exercising, you build muscle when you’re resting, so try not to do a strength training routine (of the same muscle groups) two days in a row.

I like to follow a training pattern of:

  • Strength training on one day (like this workout).
  • 20 minutes of interval training on the next day.
  • Back to strength training.
  • Back to interval training or rest!

Alternatively, pick one of these fun exercises to do on your off days instead!

Want to have an expert program your workouts for you? So you’ll never have to worry about which days should be rest days and which days should be for training?

Check out our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program to see how a certified professional can take all the guesswork out of building a workout routine.

After the Advanced Bodyweight Workout: Next Steps!

This should help you get started with a really powerful bodyweight training routine. But we hear frequently that people want MORE instruction, MORE guidance, and MORE workouts.

If that’s you, we have MULTIPLE options to take the next step. Pick the option below that best aligns with your goals and timeline:

1) If you want step-by-step guidance, a custom bodyweight training program that levels up as you get stronger, and a coach to keep you accountable, check out our killer 1-on-1 coaching program:

Our coaching program changes lives. Learn how!

2) Good at following instructions? Check out our self-paced online course, the Nerd Fitness Academy.

The Academy has 20+ workouts for both bodyweight or weight training, a benchmark test to determine your starting workout, HD demonstrations of every movement, boss battles, meal plans, a questing system, and supportive community.

Learn more about The Nerd Fitness Academy!

3) Join the Rebellion! We need good people like you in our community, the Nerd Fitness Rebellion.

Sign up in the box below to enlist and get our guide, Strength Training 101: Everything You Need to Know. It’ll help you start incorporating these advanced bodyweight moves into your training.

Download our comprehensive guide STRENGTH TRAINING 101!

  • Everything you need to know about getting strong.
  • Workout routines for bodyweight AND weight training.
  • How to find the right gym and train properly in one.

4) Level Up Your Workout! If you’re looking for more workout routines to follow, I got you covered:

  • How to Get Started with Gymnastic Rings: learn to train with gymnastic rings so you can eventually do epic moves like a Muscle-up!
  • How to Do Your First Handstand: now we’re talking! Learn the different progressions that will eventually have you getting your first freestanding handstand!
  • Beginner Strength Training Workouts: start with bodyweight training and work up to barbell training!
  • 15 Circuit Training Routines: if you enjoyed today’s advanced circuit, I’ve got many others for you to try out!
  • 6 Levels of Gym Workouts: never wonder what to do in the gym again! Follow these 6 levels of workouts to go from Newbie to Gym Hero!

I’d love to hear how this workout was for you.

Leave a comment below with your results or any questions you have on advanced bodyweight training and how else we can help.

For the Rebellion!

-Steve

PS: Seriously though, our online coaching program rocks 🙂 If you’re trying to crush pull-ups, want to get a handstand, or learn any other bodyweight movement, we got you covered.

All photo sources can be found right here:

Bodyweight workout for women

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