When sportscaster Erin Andrews was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2016, she chose to keep the information private, undergo two surgeries, and never miss a football game. Now that she is cancer-free and is choosing to share her experience with the world, she’s also partnering with Hologic, a women’s health diagnostics company, to help launch the We Can Change This STAT campaign to encourage more women to go to the doctor for their annual exam.

According to the CDC, over 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every year, and of those cases, about 4,000 women will die from the disease. But nearly all cases of cervical cancer in the U.S. can be traced back to an infection of human papillomavirus (HPV). So the best ways we have to protect against cervical cancer are the HPV vaccine and regular screening, which looks for precancerous changes to your cervical cells caused (usually) by HPV.

According to recommendations set by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, women between the ages of 21 and 65 should get a Pap smear every three years. But once you get to 30, you can choose between continuing on that three-year schedule or getting a Pap in combination with an HPV test every five years. But regardless of which screening you choose, you should still schedule an annual check-in with your ob/gyn.

“This is a disease that can be prevented and treated by getting the testing and going every year,” Jessica Shepherd, M.D., women’s health expert and ob/gyn, tells SELF. “Let’s change the conversation and have women realize this shouldn’t be a shameful topic.”

Below, we talked to Andrews about the emotional toll of being diagnosed with cervical cancer, why she kept her diagnosis private, and how she wants us to change the conversation around screening.

What advice would you have for someone just diagnosed with cervical cancer?

“I feel like you need the first 24-48 hours for a meltdown, because everyone hears the word ‘cancer’ and they’re like ‘Oh gosh, what does this mean?’ Because I had a great oncologist, we went through everything step-by-step and went from there. Every story is different, so what’s important is that I caught it early and I was able to be treated.”

What advice would you give women about cervical cancer screening?

“I was going to the doctor to get checked every single year. I don’t know if that’s something I learned from my mom—she was really good about getting us kids into the dentist and the doctor—but I’m not one that misses an appointment to the gyno. It’s just something that I do every single year. I didn’t know anything about cervical cancer before my diagnosis, but now I know that every two hours, a woman dies of cervical cancer. So I would encourage women that they need to get to the doctor. Why? Because it’s treatable and it’s preventable.”

How did you cope mentally and physically with your diagnosis?

“I’m someone that doesn’t like to deal with tough news, so how I deal is I go to work. I was in the middle of a football season when I found out that I had cancer, and I had surgery twice. Both times I was told to stay at home, but I didn’t. I had big football games to work, which were very important to me, as is my health, but I feel like I am better, mentally, when I’m working. I was very fortunate that I had a great support system in my family, my husband, my friends. I would email my doctor in the middle of the night a ton of questions, which was helpful.”

Why did you choose to keep it private for a while?

“It’s a very personal matter. Cervical cancer was not something that was getting a lot of attention, people were not talking about it openly. For me, it’s a personal thing. You’re talking about a female, you’re talking about her vagina. You’re talking about certain invasive surgeries. It’s not something that, when I’m talking about third and four and ‘Is Tom Brady gonna go for it?’ that I could say ‘Hey guys, if I could just throw it out there: I have cervical cancer’. I really wanted to keep it to myself and concentrate on the season and Dancing With the Stars.”

What was it like to finally talk about it at work?

“Thursday through Sunday I work with men. When I came forward, it was right before the Super Bowl, and I was literally on the field and I had 300-lb guys coming up to me saying ‘Thank you so much, I’ve had women in my life who have dealt with this.’ The owner of the New England patriots, Robert Kraft, was getting ready to do a sit down interview with me, and he came up to me with tears in his eyes because his wife had passed away from ovarian cancer. He just was saying he wished she had gotten it looked at sooner, and that I needed to really take it upon myself to get this out there.

“I’m the one who sits at a table with 30 men every single weekend in Green Bay and in New York and in Dallas, and I want to make cervical cancer screenings something that men can start encouraging women to do. I want men to feel comfortable to ask women if they’ve been checked. Everyone is now very comfortable speaking about breast cancer and prostate cancer, we need this to be part of the conversation as well.”

Related:

  • Cervical Cancer Screening for Women Over 30 Could Change in a Big Way
  • Cervical Cancer Is Killing More Women Than Previously Thought
  • So You Need a Cervical Biopsy—Here’s What That Actually Means

Why Erin Andrews Kept Her Cervical Cancer Diagnosis Hidden From Her Co-Workers

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It was fall 2016, and Erin Andrews felt great. At 38 years old, she exercised, ate well, and had a successful TV career as a sports reporter and the host of Dancing with the Stars. So when she had her annual checkup at the gynecologist, she expected to receive a clean bill of health. Instead, she was told she had cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer affects up to 12,000 women each year. It is both preventable and treatable, and yet 4,000 of the women diagnosed ultimately succumb to the illness yearly. To encourage women to be regularly tested for cervical cancer, Andrews has teamed up with medical technology company Hologic for the We Can Change This Stat initiative. She can’t stress the importance of regular screening enough; it’s what caught her own cancer in its early—and, most importantly, non-deadly—stages.

“Even if you feel like you’re healthy and you’re busy, it’s so important to go to the doctor,” Andrews tells InStyle. “I made time to do it every single year, and no one in my family had ever dealt with cervical cancer before. I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever, and I was getting ready for football season. I just went in for a normal exam and thought everything would be good to go. Then, I got a message from my gyno saying that things were not good.”

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Andrews’s initial reaction to learning that her Pap test revealed abnormal cells was “freakout central,” as she calls it. Still, she knew that she had to get focused. There were many big decisions ahead of her, including choosing a treatment option.

“I wasn’t even engaged to my husband yet, but I got him and my parents on the phone and we all tried to figure out what our next steps would be,” says Andrews. “There were quite a few tears, and I just thought, ‘How can this be happening? I was totally fine a year ago—this has to be wrong.’”

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After receiving her diagnosis, Andrews and her now-husband Jarret Stoll met with an oncologist to discuss her options. Luckily, she caught the cancer early enough to begin with a less aggressive approach. Alternatively, a woman who is diagnosed at a later stage may have no choice but to undergo radiation, chemotherapy, or a hysterectomy, according to women’s health expert and OB/GYN Dr. Jessica Shepherd. The best treatment route can also be determined by the results of both Pap and HPV tests.

“In 90 percent of cervical cancer cases, the leading cause is sexually-transmitted human papilloma virus, or HPV,” explains Shepherd. “Getting the HPV vaccine can decrease the risk of transmission, but women should get the Pap test starting at age 21. Then at age 30, we want women to be empowered to ask for the additional HPV test. It doesn’t require a separate test—there’s one swab that tests for both things. When we know the cause of the cervical cancer, then we can educate and treat women accordingly.”

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RELATED: How Shania Twain Overhauled Her Lifestyle After Lyme Disease Diagnosis

After deciding that surgery to remove the cancer was her best option, the doctor had another important—and brutally honest—suggestion for the couple. “He said, ‘Look, I’m going to do this surgery but I’m also going to tell you both that now is the time to have your embryos frozen, because if this doesn’t work, we’re going to need to talk about other options,’” Andrews recalls. “ were kind of talking about those things, but we’re both very career-driven and weren’t planning to have a family right away. After that first appointment, we sat at The Ivy across from the hospital and ordered a bottle of Pinot Grigio. I was bawling, and wondering if I’d be able to have kids. I said, ‘What if we have to get a surrogate and I’m not pregnant for our baby shower?’ and he said, ‘Then we’ll go to Napa with all of our friends and just drink.’ I was very lucky that he looked at it that way, but there was still the thought of, ‘What if?’ We had to have some very real conversations.”

VIDEO: Erin Andrews Reveals She Is A Cervical Cancer Survivor

After Andrews’s first procedure didn’t work, she prepared to undergo a second surgery. This time around, she was even more nervous. “I was trying to act like it wasn’t going to be stressful, but I was panicked,” she says, explaining that a twist of fate ultimately helped her keep calm. “The night before my surgery, my pregnant girlfriend went into labor. She was at the same hospital as me, and on my way , I went in and kissed her baby’s head for good luck.”

The bonding continued, post-op. “I visited their room and it was hysterical because I was in a diaper from my surgery, my girlfriend was in a diaper from just having a baby, and her kid was in a diaper,” says Andrews. “We took a photo, and it’s the funniest picture ever.”

RELATED: This Life Event Made Busy Philipps Stop Chasing Skinny and Start Getting Healthy

Andrews’s support system provided much-needed humor throughout her health battle. “My friends sent a few of bouquets to my house with notes that said, ‘Enough about your vagina, can we talk about something else?’” she says.

But outside of her inner circle, Andrews didn’t want anyone to know what she was going through. She purposefully planned doctors’ visits around her work schedule in order to keep her cancer diagnosis private. “I was in the middle of football season at that point, and I wasn’t about to miss a game,” she says. “Being on my feet for about seven hours at a time was very hard, physically. But what was even harder was that, because I work with a bunch of men, I didn’t want to act like I was sick. I didn’t want it to seem like I was in pain or that I couldn’t do my job well. Mentally, it was draining.”

Emotional recovery is just as important as physical recovery—and while Andrews kept moving full speed ahead during treatment, medical professionals recommend that a woman with cervical cancer gives her body a break.

“After a woman goes through a procedure for cervical cancer, she usually takes a week or two to relax,” says Dr. Shepherd. “Erin didn’t necessarily do that in her case, but she definitely understood that she had to find ways to decrease stress so that it wouldn’t contribute negatively to her recovery.” In addition to meditation, Andrews “tried to imagine a white light” over herself and began wearing an amethyst around her wrist (the stone is often said to provide healing energy).

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Andrews got the official news that she was cancer-free while in her dressing room for Dancing with the Stars. “My oncologist was really good about getting back to me, but I hadn’t heard from him all weekend,” she says. “I though, ‘Oh God, of course this is going to happen when I’m trying to get into a pair of spanks and some sequin number on a Monday.’ Everyone on my team knew that I was waiting, and when I saw the number calling, I put it on speakerphone. One of the girls started taking down notes, because she knew I wasn’t paying attention. The doctor said, ‘You’re good to go, and I’ll see you in six months for a checkup,’ and it was a ton of relief.”

Knowing that her cancer battle was over gave Andrews peace of mind, but she still worries about the possibility of an eventual relapse. “To be honest, I’m always very scared about it,” she says. “There’s so much anxiety when I go for my checkups. I literally feel like I’m going to pass out in the waiting room.”

Unsurprisingly, that’s a common fear. But doctors and patients can work together to stay cancer-free. “Any cancer diagnosis—especially one like cervical cancer, which we know is treatable—still requires follow up,” says Shepherd. “It’s not like Erin’s just running around in the clear. She still has to be very invested in her follow-up visits and make sure that further screening is done.”

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Now, Andrews is committed to spreading awareness about preventing cervical cancer, which claims the lives of two women every hour. “This is treatable and preventable, and women should not be dying of it,” says Andrews.

She’s determined to bring more attention to cervical cancer awareness by driving the conversation. “I’ve never felt more comfortable saying the word ‘vagina,’” says Andrews. “We’re always talking about breast cancer and prostate cancer. Now, it’s time to be comfortable talking about this, too.”

Sportscaster Erin Andrews has revealed she was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2016, and went back to work just days after undergoing surgery to treat the condition.

In an interview with the sports news website MMQB, the 38-year-old Andrews said that a routine checkup last June led her doctors to run some follow-up tests for cervical cancer. She was officially diagnosed with the condition in September, and soon underwent surgery to remove the cancer.

A few days after her operation, Andrews flew from Los Angeles to Green Bay, Wisconsin, to cover a National Football League (NFL) game.

“Should I have been standing for a full game five days after surgery? Let’s just say the doctor didn’t recommend that,” Andrews told MMBQ. ” sports were my escape. I needed to be with my crew.”

After Andrews underwent a second surgical procedure in November, doctors told her she was cancer-free and did not need chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Although Andrews will need to have regular checkups to make sure the cancer does not return, her doctors “are cautiously optimistic that she’s in the clear,” Emily Kaplan, the reporter who interviewed Andrews, told Sports Illustrated.

Here are five important facts about cervical cancer:

Thousands of U.S. women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year

Compared to other types of cancer, cervical cancer is relatively rare; cases of this cancer make up less than 1 percent of all cancer cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Still, in 2016, an estimated 12,990 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 4,120 died from the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Cervical cancer most often occurs in midlife

Andrews falls within the age group at greatest risk for cervical cancer diagnoses; about half of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are ages 35 to 55, according to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition (NCCC). But the disease can occur at older and younger ages; about 20 percent of those diagnosed are ages 65 and older, and about 14 percent are ages 20 to 34, according to the NCI. Only about 0.1 percent of women younger than 20 develop the disease, the NCI said

Most cervical cancers are caused by HPV — but not all

The vast majority of cervical cancers, more than 90 percent, are caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV is a common sexually transmitted disease, and most people will clear the infection without any problems. But in rare cases, HPV infections linger for years, and this puts women at risk for cervical cancer.

Still, there is evidence that a small percentage of cervical cancers are not related to HPV. In a recent study, researchers analyzed samples of cervical cancer tumors from 178 women, and found that nine samples, or 5 percent, did not show evidence of HPV infection. Many of these HPV-negative cancers appeared similar to the tumors seen in another type of gynecological cancer, endometrial cancer. In these cases, the cervical cancer could be due to genetic or other factors, the researchers said.

Cervical cancers don’t usually cause symptoms early on

In the early stages of cervical cancer, when the condition is most treatable, women usually don’t have any symptoms, according to the NCCC. Because of this, screening for cervical cancer with a Pap smear or HPV test is recommended, to catch precancerous lesions before they develop into cancer.

In the advanced stages, cervical cancer can cause symptoms such as abnormal bleeding or heavy discharge from the vagina, or increased urination frequency, the NCCC said. (These symptoms can also be signs of other conditions that are not related to cervical cancer.)

Treatment for cervical cancer doesn’t always lead to infertility

In the past, the main treatments for cervical cancer were a radical hysterectomy, which involves removing the uterus, cervix and part of the vagina, or radiation therapy to the pelvis, Dr. Jeffrey Fowler, a gynecologic oncologist at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, wrote in an article he contributed to Live Science. But both of these treatments prevent a woman from becoming pregnant in the future.

However, some newer treatments aim to help preserve a woman’s fertility. One procedure, known as a radical trachelectomy, removes the cervix and upper part of the vagina, but keeps the uterus, Fowler said. A suture is placed where the cervix used to be, maintaining the woman’s ability to carry a pregnancy, he said.

Among women who have this procedure and try to get pregnant afterward, about 70 percent are successful. However, the procedure is used only for some women, and they must be in the early stages of cervical cancer, Fowler said.

Original article on Live Science.

Brave Sportscaster Erin Andrews Preps For The NFL Season– Remarkably Open About Her Cancer & Fertility After Treatment

As the U.S. gears up for another football season this fall, Sportscaster Erin Andrews is prepping to hit the sidelines again with the FOX Sports NFL team. Andrews — who is also a host on ABC’s Dancing With the Stars — is every bit the busy career woman. When she’s not interviewing top NFL stars or gracing the Dancing With the Stars stage — the 41-year-old TV personality is enjoying time off and vacationing with her former hockey player husband, Jarret Stoll. You would never guess that in 2016, Andrews was diagnosed with cervical cancer.

When Andrews was 38, the cancer was discovered during a routine screening. After her own experience with the disease, Andrews became an advocate — encouraging women to make sure they visit a gynecologist yearly, and stay up-tp-date on cancer screenings.

Erin Andrews posted this photo of she and her hubby, hockey player Jarret Stoll, in London earlier this summer.

“Even if you feel like you’re healthy and you’re busy, it’s so important to go to the doctor,” Andrews said in a 2018 interview with InStyle. “I made time to do it every single year, and no one in my family had ever dealt with cervical cancer before. I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever, and I was getting ready for football season. I just went in for a normal exam and thought everything would be good to go. Then, I got a message from my gyno explaining that things were not good.”

Because Andrews was screened regularly, her cancer was caught at an early stage. Women who are diagnosed at a later stage may have to undergo radiation, chemotherapy, or some other aggressive treatment option. In Andrews’ case, she and her doctor decided that surgery was the best option for her particular situation.

While Andrews was undergoing treatment, she kept her cancer diagnosis between herself and her closest family and friends. She told InStyle that even though she could have taken the time off to rest, she decided instead to power through the football season — and not mention the diagnosis to colleagues.

When she was undergoing cancer treatment, Erin Andrews kept her diagnosis out of the public eye.

“I was in the middle of football season at that point, and I wasn’t about to miss a game,” she said. “Being on my feet for about seven hours at a time was very hard, physically. But what was even harder was that, because I work with a bunch of men, I didn’t want to act like I was sick. I didn’t want it to seem like I was in pain or that I couldn’t do my job well. Mentally, it was draining.”

After Erin got the word that she was cancer-free, even though she said she still worries about a relapse, she became much more open about discussing her experience with cancer publicly. She’s committed to spreading awareness about the disease — which claims the lives of more than 4,000 women in the U.S. alone every year, according to the American Cancer Society. Cervical cancer was once one of the deadliest types of cancer for women, however, the mortality rate has dropped significantly as the use of regular Pap tests became common practice. That’s the message Andrews attempts to spread with her advocacy.

“This is treatable and preventable, and women should not be dying of it,” she said.

Another aspect of Andrews’ cancer journey that she has spoken candidly about is the question of having children after cancer. When Andrews and her doctor first decided they would go the surgery route for treatment, her doctor sat her down to tell her that if she wanted children to be a part of her future, she should consider freezing her embryos. At the time, she and her husband were not yet married and hadn’t discussed the topic of children in depth.

Andrews was really worried that even if she froze her embryos, she would not be able to carry a pregnancy and the couple would need to use a surrogate. Luckily, she had a very supportive partner through it all.

“After that first appointment, we sat at The Ivy across from the hospital and ordered a bottle of Pinot Grigio. I was bawling, and wondering if I’d be able to have kids,” Andrews told InStyle. “I said, ‘What if we have to get a surrogate and I’m not pregnant for our baby shower?’ and he said, ‘Then we’ll go to Napa with all of our friends and just drink.’ I was very lucky that he looked at it that way, but there was still the thought of, ‘What if?’ We had to have some very real conversations.”

Fertility After Cervical Cancer

For young women battling cervical cancer, and many other types of cancer, there are fertility preservation options available. But it’s important to have the conversation with your doctor about which options you may be able to take advantage of before you undergo cancer treatment. A woman’s ability to get pregnant after cervical cancer depends on the stage of the cancer and the treatment received.

In a previous conversation with SurvivorNet, Dr. Jaime Knopman, a reproductive endocrinologist at CCRM NY, said that when it comes to preserving fertility for women with cancer — time is always of the essence. So this is a conversation to have with your doctor sooner rather than later.

“The sooner we start, the sooner that patient can then go on and do their treatment,” Dr. Knopman said. “A lot of the success comes down to how old you are at the time you froze and the quality of the lab in which your eggs or embryos are frozen in. Oftentimes we just do what we call a ‘fast start.’ We start them no matter where they are in their menstrual cycle. Because of that, it can sometimes take a bit longer than it would for traditional IVF stimulation. But all in, you’re never really talking about more than two weeks.”

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.

Cervical Cancer Survivor Erin Andrews Urges Women to Check In with Their Doctor: ‘Stop with the Excuses’

Cervical cancer survivor Erin Andrews is taking a stand.

Recently partnering with Hologic, an innovative medical technology company primarily focused on improving women’s health and well-being through early detection and treatment, the sportscaster and Dancing with the Stars host is urging all women to be proactive.

“For me and family, we were just very shocked. We knew the reaction was going to be powerful but we didn’t know the stats involved with cervical cancer. Every two hours a woman dies of cervical cancer. When myself, my family, my husband saw that we just had no idea that this was as big of a problem as it is. People aren’t really discussing these numbers and stats.”

Adding, “I’m out there to encourage women to get to your doctor and go get checked. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable but our goal is to get women to their doctors. Women shouldn’t be dying of this. Another thing is, every woman is very busy. And we all like to use that as a crutch, but we’ve got to stop with the excuses you have to put it in your calendar and you have to go.”

In 2016, Andrews received some unexpected and troublesome news – she was diagnosed with cervical cancer.

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“It didn’t sit well,” she says. “I was sitting in the middle of a conference room with all my coworkers and I was prepping for a game that was going to be one of our biggest games of the season. I left the conference room in tears and all of my coworkers saw me. I called my mom and dad and my husband at the same time and said we need to talk. We looked at my schedule to see when we could fit in surgery in between Dancing with the Stars and my football game.”

Andrews eventually underwent surgery 17 days after her diagnosis, and told her doctor that she had to be back to health in time to cover that Sunday’s football game.

“I was stressed out beyond belief,” she says. “I was a wreck, but everybody deals with stress. It could’ve been a lot worse for me, and thankfully, I went to the doctor. We caught it early.”

RELATED VIDEO: ‘Dancing With The Stars’ Host Erin Andrews & Hockey Player Jarret Stoll Tie The Knot

Now, a year and a half after her successful surgery, Andrews is happily married and still rocking the football field sidelines and the Dancing with the Stars ballroom.

And come June 24, Andrews and husband Jarret Stoll will be celebrating their first wedding anniversary.

Image zoom Tori Pintar

“We joke but it’s true, we don’t really see each other very much,” Andrews say of her first year of marriage to Stoll. “I highly suggest it. It’s awesome. It’s my offseason time and the time that I’m available and can make dinner. My husband is working really hard right now so I have to take care of him now but it’s nice to have a break!”

 

Cervical cancer is not only treatable; it’s preventable. However, approximately 8 million U.S. women ages 21 to 65 years old reported they had not been tested for cervical cancer in the last 5 years.2 In addition, more than half of new cervical cancer cases occur in women who have never or rarely been tested.3 “If you’re not getting tested,” said Andrews, “you’re putting yourself at risk.”

In partnership with Hologic, Erin will advocate for women to get tested regularly for cervical cancer. In addition, new tools will be available to help women prioritize and maximize their doctor visits. More information is featured at ChangeThisSTAT.com and in the offices of healthcare providers nationwide. Women can also follow the story on the We Can Change This STAT Facebook page and Erin’s social media channels.

“For more than 20 years, Hologic has been dedicated to improving women’s health and well-being through early detection,” said Tom West, president, Diagnostic Solutions division at Hologic. “Many insurance policies cover cervical cancer testing with no deductible, and there are clinics across the country that provide testing at low or no cost. No matter their circumstances, women can and should get tested regularly for this preventable cancer.”

Hologic is the market-leading supplier in the United States of Pap tests and HPV (human papillomavirus) tests, frequently used together on the same sample to screen for cervical pre-cancer and cancer (an approach known as Pap+HPV Together or co-testing). According to guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, women under the age of 30 should get regular Pap testing, with co-testing being the preferred approach for women 30 to 65.4

“Surviving cervical cancer made me recognize how fortunate I am to be in a position to advocate for lifesaving tests,” said Andrews. “I’m asking every woman to join me in making an appointment for their annual exam – and to tell the women they love to do it, too.”

To learn more, please visit ChangeThisSTAT.com.

About cervical cancer
Over the last 40 years, the number of cervical cancer cases has been cut in half, thanks largely to regular testing, which can identify abnormalities before they become cervical cancer.5

Though about eight out of 10 women will contract HPV at some point in their lives, most of the time the virus goes away. In some cases, however, it can remain and promote development of cervical cancer. For women between 30 and 65, the preferred screening approach is to test with Pap+HPV Together, which detects 95 percent of cervical cancer cases.6 Screening with both tests also prevents more cases of pre-cancer than either test used alone.6 In fact, the largest retrospective study of cervical cancer testing strategies found that one out of five cases of cervical cancer was missed when the HPV test was used alone.6

About Hologic
Hologic, Inc. is an innovative medical technology company primarily focused on improving women’s health and well-being through early detection and treatment. For more information on Hologic, visit www.hologic.com.

Forward-Looking Statements
This press release may contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties, including statements about the use of Hologic’s diagnostic products. There can be no assurance these products will achieve the benefits described herein or that such benefits will be replicated in any particular manner with respect to an individual patient. The actual effect of the use of the products can only be determined on a case-by-case basis depending on the particular circumstances and patient in question. In addition, there can be no assurance that these products will be commercially successful or achieve any expected level of sales. Hologic expressly disclaims any obligation or undertaking to release publicly any updates or revisions to any such statements presented herein to reflect any change in expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements are based.

Hologic and The Science of Sure are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Hologic, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries.

Investor Contact:
Michael Watts
+1 858.410.8588
[email protected]

Media Contact:
Jane Mazur
+1 508.263.8764 (direct)
+1 585.355.5978 (mobile)
[email protected]

  1. American Cancer Society. Cancer facts and figures 2017. 2017.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cervical cancer is preventable. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Website. https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/cervical-cancer/index.html. Updated November 2014. Accessed February 13, 2018.
  3. Benard VB et al. Vital signs: cervical cancer incidence, mortality, and screening – United States, 2007-2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2014;63:1.
  4. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Practice bulletin No. 157: Cervical cancer screening and prevention. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2016;127(1):185-7.
  5. American Cancer Society. Cancer facts and figures 2017. 2017:27.
  6. Blatt et al. Comparison of cervical cancer screening results among 256,648 women in multiple clinical practices. Cancer Cytopathology. 2015;123(5):282-288 .

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Erin Andrews Talks About Not Disclosing Cancer Diagnosis to Coworkers

When the NFL season officially kicks off next week, veteran reporter Erin Andrews will be on hand to cover Thursday Night Football for FOX Sports. Just last year, Andrews revealed that she had privately battled cervical cancer while fulfilling her responsibilities as a sportscaster, reports InStyle.

Diagnosed in 2016, Andrews received the news following an annual checkup with her gynecologist. She had surgery 17 days later and 48 hours after her surgery, Andrews was on a plane to Wisconsin to report on a Green Bay Packers game that weekend, according to PEOPLE.

“I was in the middle of football season at that point, and I wasn’t about to miss a game,” Andrews told InStyle in March. “Being on my feet for about seven hours at a time was very hard, physically.”

She continued, “But what was even harder was that, because I work with a bunch of men, I didn’t want to act like I was sick. I didn’t want it to seem like I was in pain or that I couldn’t do my job well. Mentally, it was draining.”

Her doctors’ visits were planned around her work schedule (including her gig as cohost of Dancing with the Stars) so her colleagues wouldn’t suspect anything was the matter. Andrews’s career was just too important to her.

Andrews had to undergo a second surgery after her first one didn’t work. Then, she finally got the news she wanted to hear: She was cancer-free.

Now, she is dedicating her celebrity and time to raising awareness about ways to reduce mortality from cervical cancer, which claims one woman’s life every two hours.

She recently partnered with the medical technology company Hologic on the “We Can Change This Stat” initiative, which aims to get women tested regularly for cervical cancer.

“I’ve never felt more comfortable saying the word vagina,” Andrews said. “We’re always talking about breast cancer and prostate cancer. Now, it’s time to be comfortable talking about this too.”

to learn more about cervical cancer.

[email protected] Talks About Not Disclosing #Cancer Diagnosis to Coworkers – The sportscaster didn’t let #cervicalcancer stop her from doing her job. http://ow.ly/CHv130mhAMv #nfl via @cancerhealthmag

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Cervical Cancer Survivor Erin Andrews Roars into 2020 with Drew Brees Interview

TV personality and Fox NFL sideline reporter Erin Andrews, diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2016, has inspired so many since she went public with her disease. Continuing her packed schedule and working nonstop since her surgery that year, Andrews, now cancer free, has already gotten 2020 off to a rousing start.

On Monday, the reporter, 41, who is also co-host of “Dancing With the Stars,” sat down with New Orleans Saints star quarterback Drew Brees for Fox NFL to discuss his injured thumb, the silver lining — “I didn’t get hit for six weeks” — and how the team is in its prime.

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I sat down with @drewbrees ahead of the NFC Wild Card matchup between the @saints and @vikings • @nflonfox @jsantos1111 @vtrilling @jilliangregory

A post shared by Erin Andrews (@erinandrews) on Jan 5, 2020 at 2:09pm PST

The interview came during National Cervical Awareness Month. Andrew herself went public with her story in January 2017 to help spread awareness about the disease.

Andrews’ Cancer Journey

Because Andrews was screened regularly, her cancer was caught at an early stage. Women who are diagnosed at a later stage may have to undergo radiation, chemotherapy, or some other aggressive treatment option. In Andrews’ case, she and her doctor decided that surgery was the best option.

RELATED: ‘Please Check Your Beautiful Tatas and Get Your Pap Smears’ — Actress Joey King Urges Women on Instagram to Get Screened for Cancer

“Even if you feel like you’re healthy and you’re busy, it’s so important to go to the doctor,” Andrews said in a 2018 interview with InStyle. “I made time to do it every single year, and no one in my family had ever dealt with cervical cancer before. I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever, and I was getting ready for football season. I just went in for a normal exam and thought everything would be good to go. Then, I got a message from my gyno explaining that things were not good.”

And she told Good Morning America that she hopes to start a family with her husband, former NHL player Jarret Stoll, and could it do naturally because she “didn’t have to have a hysterectomy. … But that is because I went and got tested and because we were able to treat it early, and that is all you need to tell the women in your life.”

RELATED: Sportscaster Erin Andrews Gives Women a New Way to Love Sports — An Inspiring Cancer Survivor Story

From Surgery to the Super Bowl

Fortunately, Andrews was able to keep working during her treatment. Seventeen days after her diagnosis, she had surgery for her cancer, and 48 hours later got on a plane to Wisconsin to cover the Green Bay Packers, according to People.

RELATED: Sex After A Gynecological Cancer — “It’s a Journey”

“I don’t really like dealing with the things like this in my life,” she told the magazine. “I want to talk about next year’s Super Bowl and ‘Dancing With the Stars’ and the fall season, and everything like that.”

Andrews has remained positive, thrilling her supporters with her optimism and strength.

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✌???? to the Holiday Season! Now back to work ❤️????????

A post shared by Erin Andrews (@erinandrews) on Dec 28, 2019 at 11:11am PST

Cervical Cancer

More than 13,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer each year, but the disease is preventable with vaccination and appropriate screening, according to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition.

HPV and Cervical Cancer

While we don’t know whether Andrews had HPV, when a person contracts a specific “high-risk” strain of HPV, their body may have more difficulty shaking the virus, which can linger and eventually lead to cancer. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The vaccine protects against the types of HPV that are most likely to cause cervical cancers, as well as cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus and orophaynx.

HPV Can Cause Cancer in Men too

When people talk about HPV and cancer risk, they tend to be talking about cervical cancer. And while this discussion is incredibly important (nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV), people should be aware that HPV puts them at risk of developing several other cancers as well. And yes, HPV can cause cancer in men. Cancers of the vagina, penis, anus and throat have all been linked to HPV.

“The strains of HPV that cause cervical cancer are the same strains of HPV that cause throat cancer,” says Dr. Jessica Geiger, a medical oncologist at Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center. “The average patient with HPV-related throat cancer tends to be males in their 40s or 50s, who were never a smoker or just a very light tobacco user.”

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.

Constance Costas is a writer for SurvivorNet.

Read MoreErin Andrews (photo courtesy of We Can Change This STAT campaign)

Sports broadcaster and Dancing With the Stars host Erin Andrews has publicly faced stressful challenges and pushed forward to make a difference. Her bravery in the face of a stalking nightmare and public trial of the man who egregiously violated her privacy reminded others that we must stand strong to protect victims’ rights. Once back on the field and working, Andrews faced another obstacle after being diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Related: Erin Andrews Talks Football, Dancing With the Stars and Toughing It Out

Privately addressing her treatment needs, including surgery, the broadcaster later shared her situation in an interview and was surprised by the response.

Listen to the conversation with Erin Andrews on Apple Podcasts or on Stitcher.

“I knew there’d be a lot of attention on the fact that I had worked after having two surgeries and didn’t tell anybody. What I didn’t realize, the attention would be then focused on the stats, the stats of cervical cancer that every two hours a woman dies of it. I had no idea that that was what I had been facing or what women are facing with this disease.”

Soon Andrews would be hearing the positive messages from those impacted by her medical disclosure, reminding her that the discussion of cervical cancer can change and save lives. Recently partnering with women’s health diagnostics company Hologic in the launch of the We Can Change This STAT campaign, Andrews, who is now cancer free, is hopeful that people will learn the importance of annual exams and the fact that cervical cancer is treatable and preventable.

“You have to make time for yourself…I don’t care how busy your schedule is. Mine is really, really busy. You just—you know, use me as an example. I go all the time and I still had it . So you need to make an appointment with your doctor and go get checked.”

Now that Dancing With The Stars has wrapped for the season, the typically non-stop Andrews is looking forward to some well-deserved R & R.

“I am taking a nice little break before the craziness of the fall starts…just going to kind of enjoy the beach, and my puppy, and my husband, and that’s it.”

Find out more about the We Can Change This STAT campaign here.

Follow Nancy’s conversations on Apple Podcasts and Facebook.

Nancy Berk, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist, author, comic and entertainment analyst. The host of the showbiz podcast Whine At 9, Nancy digs a little deeper as she chats with fascinating celebrities and industry insiders. Her book College Bound and Gagged: How to Help Your Kid Get into a Great College Without Losing Your Savings, Your Relationship, or Your Mind can be seen in the feature film Admission starring Tina Fey and Paul Rudd.

Cervical cancer erin andrews

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