Women’s Running Trainers

Upgrade your comf’ mile on mile with our collection of Women’s Running Trainers. With top brands like Nike, adidas, PUMA and more bringing all their latest support and cushioning tech, we’re boosting you that extra stride. With designs for every distance, push harder, reach further and release your power.

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  • Quick View Nike Downshifter 9 Women’s £55.00
  • Quick View Nike Flex Experience Run 9 Women’s £60.00
  • Quick View Nike Air VaporMax Flyknit 3 Women’s £170.00
  • Quick View Nike Air VaporMax 360 Women’s £180.00
  • Quick View Nike Vista Lite Women’s £95.00
  • Quick View Nike Flex Experience Run 9 Women’s £60.00
  • Quick View Nike Air VaporMax Flyknit 3 Women’s £170.00
  • Quick View Under Armour Charged Rogue 2 Women’s £65.00
  • Quick View Nike Downshifter 9 Women’s £55.00
  • Quick View Under Armour HOVR Phantom RN Women’s £120.00
  • Quick View Nike Downshifter 9 Women’s £55.00
  • Quick View Nike City Trainer 2 Women’s £55.00
  • Quick View Nike Flex Essential TR Women’s £48.00
  • Quick View Nike Air VaporMax Flyknit 3 Women’s £170.00
  • Quick View Nike React Element 55 Women’s £115.00
  • Quick View ASICS GEL-Quantum Infinity Jin Women’s £120.00
  • Quick View Under Armour HOVR STRT Women’s £85.00
  • Quick View Under Armour HOVR Phantom RN Women’s £120.00
  • Quick View Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 36 Shield Women’s £115.00
  • Quick View Nike Air VaporMax Flyknit 3 Women’s £170.00
  • Quick View ASICS GEL-Quantum 90 2 Women’s £80.00
  • Quick View Nike Renew Run Women’s £80.00
  • Quick View Under Armour HOVR STRT Women’s £85.00
  • Quick View Nike Joyride Dual Run Women’s £115.00

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(When I was with Runner’s World, I traveled to Kenya with a group from the magazine in 2005. Our dozen or so runners met with Kipchoge’s training group one day high in the Great Rift Valley. My wife wanted to get in a few miles, despite the altitude and a hilly course. I sheepishly asked the Kenyan runners if anyone was willing to run at a 12-minute-per-mile pace with us. Kipchoge stepped forward, an easy smile on his face, and did four miles with us.)

Still, the I.A.A.F. acknowledges that it has a problem, especially with the Tokyo Olympics coming up fast. In a statement, it said, “It is clear that some forms of technology would provide an athlete with assistance that runs contrary to the values of the sport.” The group has appointed a technical committee to study the shoe question, and make a report in the next two months.

Not every fast marathoner wears Nike shoes. Jared Ward finished sixth in the 2016 Olympic Marathon, and ran 2:09:25 in April in the Boston Marathon. When Ward lines up at the New York City Marathon in two weeks, he’ll be wearing Saucony shoes, as he has for years.

But not ones you can find at your local shoe store. Ward has been working with the biomechanist Spencer White, Saucony’s vice president for human performance, to design a shoe that is, well, a bit like the Vaporfly. Ward believes they have succeeded. “My new shoes feel so good that I know I’m ready to compete well in them,” he said.

Nike is well known in the patent world for its large and increasingly frequent applications. It also has plenty of lawyers, though no one can say what might happen in any patent infringement case until it is litigated.

White said he would be unhappy if the I.A.A.F. tightened its shoe regulation policies. “We could end up limiting creativity and losing the chance to improve running shoes for the everyday runner,” he noted. “I think the ‘must be widely available’ part of the rule is the best answer.”

Tucker’s view is more in line with Burns’s. “The solution is very simple,” Tucker said. “Limit the stack height” — which is the midsole height — “and ban the addition of springlike devices in the midsole.”

Flex 2016 run Nike

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