How Freediving In the Ocean Taught Me to Slow Down and Manage Stress

Photo: I Am Water Ocean Travel

Who knew that refusing to do something as natural as breathing could be a hidden talent? For some, it can even be life-changing. While studying in Sweden in 2000, Hanli Prinsloo, then 21, was introduced to freediving-the age-old art of swimming to great depths or distances and resurfacing in a single breath (no oxygen tanks allowed). Frigid fjord temps and a leaky wetsuit made her first-ever dive far from idyllic, but just serendipitous enough for her to discover a bizarre knack for holding her breath for really long. Amazingly long.

Upon dipping her toe in the sport, the South African was instantly hooked, especially when she learned that her lung capacity is six liters-as much as most men and higher than the average woman’s, which is closer to four. When not moving, she can go six minutes with no air-and not die. Try listening to the entire song “Like a Rolling Stone” by Bob Dylan in one inhale. Impossible, right? Not for Prinsloo. (Related: Epic Water Sports You’ll Want to Try)

Prinsloo went on to smash a total of 11 national records in six disciplines (her best dive being 207 feet with fins) during her decade-long career as a competitive freediver, which ended in 2012 when she decided to focus on her nonprofit, I AM WATER Foundation, in Cape Town.

Founded two years earlier, the nonprofit’s mission is to help kids and adults, particularly those from underprivileged coastal communities in South Africa, fall in love with the ocean and, ultimately, fight to preserve it. Fact is, climate change is real-as evidenced by Cape Town’s imminent water crisis. By 2019, it may become the world’s first major modern city to run out of municipal water. While H2O from the faucet is not equivalent to the beach kind, water conversation, on all levels, is crucial for our existence. (Related: How Climate Change Affects Your Mental Health)

“The more I felt connected to the ocean, the more I saw how deeply disconnected most people are from it. Everybody loves staring at the sea, but it’s an on-the-surface appreciation. That lack of connection has resulted in us behaving in some pretty irresponsible ways to the ocean, because we can’t see the destruction,” says Prinsloo, now 39, whom I met in-person last July while visiting Cape Town as a guest of Extraordinary Journeys, the exclusive U.S. tour operator for I AM WATER Ocean Travel. Prinsloo co-founded this travel company in 2016 with her long-time partner, Peter Marshall, an American world champion swimmer, to support her nonprofit and share their enthusiasm about all things aquatic in a sustainable and responsible way.

Jumping In Head First

The way Prinsloo describes people’s relationship to the ocean is actually how I feel about my body. I’ve been working on building a strong mind-body connection through meditation (albeit, not regular) and exercise (two to three times a week) for years. And yet, I often feel disappointed when my body fails to respond to my seemingly simple requests to go harder, stronger, faster, better. I feed it decently well and give it plenty of sleep, and still, I suffer from stress-induced stomachaches or feelings of uneasiness all the time. Like most people, I get frustrated by my unpredictable vessel, largely because I can’t see what exactly anxiety is doing to me internally, though I can feel it. Going into this adventure, I was certain that I would tank at learning to freedive. I’ve always asked a lot of my body-10 triathlons, hiking up mountains, biking from San Francisco to LA, traveling the world nonstop with little rest-but never to work in conjunction with my mind to keep completely calm while performing a challenging activity. (Related: 7 Adventurous Women Who Will Inspire You to Go Outside)

The beauty of these seafaring adventures is that no one is expecting you to be an expert. Over the course of the week or so, you take breathing, yoga, and freediving lessons, while enjoying some amazing perks, like private villas and personal chefs. The best perk of all: Exploring some of the world’s most beautiful destinations, including Cape Town, Mexico, Mozambique, the South Pacific, and, two new destinations for 2018, the Caribbean in June and Madagascar in October. The goal of each trip isn’t meant to turn you pro, like Prinsloo, but rather help you strengthen your relationship with the ocean as well as your mind-body connection, plus maybe cross off a bucket list item, like swimming with dolphins or whale sharks. Perhaps, find a hidden talent, too.

“There really are no prerequisites. You don’t have to be a hardcore athlete or diver to do this. It’s really more about curiosity for learning something new about yourself and experiencing very close animal encounters. We get a lot of yogis, nature-lovers, hikers, trail runners, cyclists as well as city-dwellers looking for something to completely take their mind off work,” Prinsloo says. As a self-employed, type-A New Yorker, it sounded like the perfect escape. I desperately longed to get out of my head and away from my desk. (Related: 4 Reasons Why Adventure Travel Is Worth Your PTO)

Trying My Hand at Freediving

We started our first freediving lesson at Windmill Beach in Kalk Bay, a small, secluded, scenic section of False Bay, which includes Boulders Beach, where adorable South African penguins hang out. There, I put on a pair of goggles, a thick hooded wetsuit, plus neoprene boots and gloves to avoid getting hypothermia in the wintry, 50-something degree Atlantic (hello, southern hemisphere). Last, we each put on an 11-pound rubber weight belt to combat “floaty bum,” as Prinsloo called our buoyant Beyonce booties. Then, like Bond girls on a mission, we slowly entered the water. (Fun fact: Prinsloo was Bond girl Halle Berry’s underwater body-double in the 2012 shark movie, Dark Tide.)

Thankfully, there were no great whites hiding among the dense kelp forest, about a five-minute swim from shore. Beyond a few small schools of fish and starfish, we had the anchored canopies, swaying in the pristine water, all to ourselves. For the next 40 minutes, Prinsloo directed me to grab hold of one of the long vines of algae, and practice slowly pulling myself toward the invisible ocean floor. The farthest I got was maybe five or six hand-pulls, equalizing (holding my nose and blowing out to pop my ears) each step of the way.

While the breathtaking charm and serenity of marine life were undeniable, I couldn’t help but feel a little bummed that I, too, wasn’t secretly gifted. At no point did I feel unsafe or scared thanks to Prinsloo’s constant soothing presence and reassuring “thumbs up” below the surface, plus check-ins and smiles above the surface. In fact, I felt surprisingly calm, but not at ease. My mind was pissed at my body for needing to come up for air so often. My brain wanted to push my body, but as usual, my body had other plans. I was too disjointed internally to make it work.

Getting a Hang of the Breathwork

The next morning, we practiced a short vinyasa flow while overlooking the ocean from the pool deck of my hotel. Then, she guided me through a few 5-minute breath meditations (inhaling for 10 counts, exhaling for 10 counts), each culminating in a breath-holding exercise that she clocked on her iPhone. I didn’t have high hopes that I’d surpass 30 seconds, especially after yesterday. But still, I did my best think about all the science that she had been feeding me for the last 24 hours pertaining to our ability to go without air.

“The breath-hold has three different phases: 1) Total relaxation when you’re almost asleep, 2) awareness when the urge to breathe sets in, and 3) contractions when the body is literally trying to force you to gasp for air. Most people will start breathing in the awareness phase because that’s what the early reminder makes us do,” Prinsloo explains. Bottom line: The body has several built-in mechanisms that will stop you from voluntarily suffocating yourself. It’s programmed to shut down, or blackout, to force oxygen intake before any harm is done.

In other words, my body has got my back. It doesn’t need my brain’s help to tell it when to breathe. It instinctively knows exactly when I need oxygen, long before risking any real damage. The reason Prinsloo is telling me this and that we’re practicing this on land is so that when I’m in the water, I can reassure my antsy, over-active mind that my body has got this, and that I should trust it to tell me when it’s time to come up for air. The breath-holding exercise reinforces just this: It’s a team effort, not a dictatorship led by my noggin.

At the end of four exercises, Prinsloo revealed that my first three holds were well over one minute, which was astounding. My fourth breath hold, which is when I heeded her advice and covered my mouth and nose during some contractions (sounds scarier than it was), I broke two minutes. TWO MINUTES. What?! My exact time was 2 minutes and 20 seconds! I couldn’t believe it. And, at no point, did I panic. In fact, I’m positive that if we had continued, I could have gone longer. But breakfast was calling, so, you know, priorities.

Discovering New Talents

“We’re happy when guests on day one get over a minute or minute and a half. Over two minutes is phenomenal,” Prinsloo fills my head with dreams that I never knew I had. “On seven-day trips, we get everyone doing over two, three, even four minutes. If you were to do this for a week, I bet you could be over four minutes.” My god, maybe I do have a hidden talent after all! If I had four whole minutes, which feels doubly long when you’re in the ocean and moving super slowly, to enjoy complete and utter peace both under the quiet and calm sea-as well as in my body and mind-I might actually get better at managing stress and anxiety at home, too. (Related: The Many Health Benefits of Trying New Things)

Sadly, I had a plane to catch that evening, so putting my newfound skills to the test was not an option this trip. Guess that means I’ll need to plan another trip to meet up with Prinsloo again soon. For now, I have a large, framed reminder hanging above my dining table: The drone-shot image of Prinsloo and I swimming in this special bay in Cape Town. I smile at it every day, and feel a wave of calm whenever I think about this extraordinary experience. I am already holding my breath til I can do it all over again.

  • By Cristina Goyanes @CDGoyanes

Stories: Holding your breath? It’s time to let it out.

on Oct 10, 2013 in Articles, Stories |

“How long can you hold your breath?”

The other day I saw a short portion of a TV show where the host asked this question as he proceeded to jump into a pool. Ironically, it has something to do with how long you’ll live. Curious, I held my breath, knowing that my lung capacity was likely not as good as his. As a child, I never learned to swim, partly because I was afraid (or didn’t know how) to hold my breath underwater.

When I was pregnant with our first child, I practiced breathing in Lamaze classes and was amazed by the effectiveness of focused breath control in alleviating pain and calming nerves. I learned even more when I took voice lessons and worked on proper inhale/exhale techniques. Recently, I’ve come to appreciate yoga’s emphasis on deep breathing and the constant reminder to breathe while holding poses.

Why is it that our bodies breathe simply and easily when we aren’t paying attention, but at other times, it takes effort and self-control? When we’re anxious or fearful, breathing becomes shallow and rapid. We may even find ourselves holding our breath, often unintentionally. This is also why sleep apnea is so serious; the normal breathing cycle is interrupted and one’s health is affected.

Sometimes the rhythm of a writing life reflects a breathing cycle. I’ve gone to many writing conferences, participated in several different writers groups, read how-to books, etc. I’ve been filled with ideas, encouragement, and know-how. Inspiration isn’t hard to come by. Yet being inspired (breathing in) is only part of the process. Letting it out brings it full circle.

That’s why I’ve decided to truly embrace the Breathe conference theme this year – “Let it Out.” Holding my breath is hard work! Physically, it’s impossible to only inhale and to never exhale. Yet it is possible to accumulate knowledge, to be filled with ideas, to make plans, and then avoid writing. The actual sharing and the outpouring of words that have accumulated in my heart and head.

So following this year’s conference theme advice, I want to not only breathe in, but I also want to exhale. I want to feel the pressure and passion that builds up inside and then release those words to the waiting page!

Jeremiah 20:9b “…his word is in my heart like a fire, a fire shut up in my bones. I am weary of holding it in; indeed, I cannot.”

Freediving / How I Learned to Hold My Breath for 3 Minutes (in a Day)

All photos courtesy of Kristin Kuba

Ever thought it would be awesome to hold your breath for a long time? I’m talking 4-5 minutes long. Being a surfer and someone who loves the water, I’ve had this thought a lot.

Years ago I remember seeing an episode of National Geographic about spearfishermen in the South Pacific. I was mesmerized when I saw a fisherman dive down 30-40 feet and walk along the ocean floor for 4-5 minutes at a time in search of his next meal.

It blew my mind that anyone could hold their breath for that long, especially since my lifetime achievement was only around one minute and thirty seconds. I thought you’d either have to be a human-fish hybrid with gills or you’d have to train for years to get to that level. Turns out I was wrong on both accounts.

Recently I’ve watched in awe on Instagram as people go diving in the ocean on a single breath swimming through caves and taking you on underwater journeys that seem far too long to be without a tank of oxygen.

I decided that freediving was something I wanted to learn. I figured it could only give me more confidence and composure during long hold downs when I wipe out surfing and that it could take my diving and spearfishing experience to a whole new level.

Before I go on, if you want to learn breath holding secrets and techniques from the top ocean athletes in the world, The Ocean Warrior Course is a good place to start and will take your breath holds and confidence in the ocean to a place you never thought possible.

Freediving & How to Increase Your Breath Hold

Freediving Instructors International

I did some research on freediving courses in Oahu and found Freediving Instructors International (FII), an organization that offers freediving courses led by highly trained and skilled freediving instructors.

FII has courses for divers of all levels. They have beginner, intermediate, and advanced classes, plus a number of specialty courses like spearfishing and waterman survival.

The Level I Freediver course is two days, part classroom lecture style learning and part hands-on skill development. It seemed like the perfect platform for learning the fundamentals of freediving so we decided to give it a go.

Our instructor was Daniel Koval. Daniel is an internationally recognized spearfisher and freediving competitor. The guy is a freakin’ fish. He can hold his breath for over six minutes and dive beyond 300 feet, making him one of the deepest divers in the United States. Sounds like the right kind of person to be learning from, huh?

DAY ONE: School is in Session

The first half of day one was all about learning the fundamentals. Daniel led us through a 56-page freediving handbook which covered proper equipment, physics and physiology, correct breathing, breath-hold techniques, safety, and problem management.

The info we learned during the first half of the day was thought-provoking and inspiring. Daniel has trained thousands of entry-level freedivers like ourselves, and most of them are able to hold their breath for three minutes on their very first day of the course. I could hardly believe this was possible, but I was determined to be one of them.

The second half of the day we suited up and got in the water for some hands-on learning. We worked on our dive entries, how to be a good dive partner, safety protocols, and static breath-holds.

A static breath hold (aka static apnea) is when you hold your breath without any movement, fully relaxed, and perfectly still, as long as you can.

It can essentially be done anywhere above or below the water. We did the exercise floating face down in the water which we learned makes it a little easier because being submerged in the water activates our natural diving instincts, called the mammalian dive reflex.

We performed three static breath-holds with targets of 1, 2, and 3 minutes, and I have to share my experience because it was a trip.

On the first target, I had no problem holding my breath for the minute. The second hold was a different story. I came up short, only getting to 56 seconds! I was super bummed and down on myself for not even getting close to 2 minutes. I started to have negative thoughts about there being no way I could reach 3 minutes on the next attempt.

As I waited for the others to finish up their 2-minute holds, I reflected on what happened. Daniel asked why I had come up and I told him the urge to breath felt too strong.

During the course, we learned that the urge to breathe is due to a couple of things. One being the build-up of CO2 in our lungs, and another being our instinctual desire to exhale after every inhale.

Most divers experience contractions in their diaphragm at some point after this sensation kicks in. Apparently, dealing with contractions is just part of the mental battle of freediving, and everyone experiences contractions a bit differently.

Daniel likes to make a game out of his breath-holds to see just how many contractions he can handle. He mentioned his first contraction is usually around 1:30-2 minutes and that he has counted to well over 100 contractions in a 5-6 minute hold! That’s crazy.

So back to my experience. As I prepared for my third breath hold (target time, 3 minutes), I thought about what happened on my last attempt. I had been so focused on holding my breath and not breathing that it made me want to breathe even more. So much that I couldn’t resist coming up for that sweet oxygen.

We had a few minutes to relax before our third and final static hold. Daniel gave a pep talk which helped me get my head back in the game. “This is the safest environment to push yourself in,” Daniel said, “freediving is mostly mental and very few people ever push themselves to what they’re capable of.”

I felt like I needed a strategy. If a were to float there and think about nothing but holding my breath for 3 minutes, I would never make it.

In the last moment before my final attempt, I thought to focus on counting incredibly slow to distract my mind and fool myself that I wasn’t actually trying to hold my breath for 3 minutes.

Those 3 minutes were like an epic battle between mental weakness and will. The first 60 seconds were pretty easy, I had only counted to about 12 and I was feeling good.

The second minute got a bit harder. My mind started to wander and the urge to breath reared its ugly face. Per one of Daniel’s tips, I surveyed my body from head to toe to ensure I was completely relaxed and kept trying to come back to where I left off counting.

The third minute was really strange. It felt like time was flying by and standing still. The urge to breath was strong, but so was I. I could hear Daniel and Tara above the water, but it was muffled and I couldn’t quite make out what they were saying.

I heard “15 more seconds til target time.” But since I had fallen short on my previous attempt, we had discussed my personal target time being 2 minutes as opposed to the full 3.

I started a very slow countdown from 15 and calmly came up when they tapped my shoulder at the target time. I wasn’t sure if I had held my breath for my individual target of 2 minutes, or for the full 3. When they told me I had gone the full 3 minutes, I celebrated like I had scored the game-winning touchdown in a big game. I was fired up. Take that, foolish mind! I win, haha.

DAY TWO: Open Water, Diving for Depth

On the second day, we headed out into open water to put our newly developed skills to the test. We swam a few hundred yards offshore at Ala Moana to where it was about 70 feet deep. Daniel and his girlfriend Kristen (who is also a badass freediver and the gal behind the lens on all these great pics) set up shop. Daniel set up freediving ropes marked at 5, 10, 15, and 20 meters (66 feet).

The plan was to warm up by diving to each of the marks on the rope, with the ultimate goal of reaching the bottom marker at 2o meters.

When I was on my 10 meters (33 feet) warm up I heard some nearby whales singing. The acoustics were so loud and beautiful, it was like I was in an amphitheater listening to a whale song orchestra. I didn’t want to surface, but you know, I’m only human and that whole urge to breath thing kicked in so I swam up for air. That was an unforgettable experience.

There were five students in the course that day, and only myself and another guy ended up making it the entire 20 meters (66 feet). It was very liberating. I felt like I could’ve gone a bit farther, but that’s reserved for the Level II Freediver course where they dive deeper (pun intended, haha!) into safety and rescue, proper technique, and breath-holds. They also literally dive twice as deep, up to 40 meters (132 feet!).

Food For Thought

In case you were wondering, a good rule of thumb for breath-holds is that you should be able to hold your breath about half the time when moving (dynamic) as you can when you’re not moving (static).

And when you freedive for depth you travel about 1 meter per second. So a 10-meter dive should only take about 20 seconds round trip. 10 seconds down and 10 seconds back up. Our deepest dive was 20 meters, so we only needed to be able to hold our breath for about 40 seconds total, which was easy after all the training we had done.

All in all the course was awesome! There was nothing but camaraderie, support, and good vibes with the whole crew. I’ve only scratched the surface on the mysterious world of freediving with this post. There is so much to learn and inherent risks involved so I encourage everyone to get proper instruction and training if you already freedive or if you would like to get into it.

I plan to delve deeper into the hobby and eventually want to take the Level II Freediver, Spearfishing, and Waterman Survival courses… I’m hooked!

If you’re feeling inspired to give freediving a shot or you want to up your game, check out Daniel Koval over at DeepFreediving.com and enroll in one of his awesome courses. You’ll be stoked you did! Daniel is a natural teacher with the perfect balance of patience, humor, and encouragement making him a real pleasure to train with.

Alternatively, if you don’t have the luxury of zipping over to Hawaii real quick for an in-person freediving course, I highly recommended you check out The Ocean Warrior Course which is a waterman’s safety course that teaches beginner to advanced individuals how to maximize breath holds and tap into the secrets of the most elite underwater athletes and waterman in the world.

Get more info about The Ocean Warrior Course here >>

See you in the water!

Cheers, Eric

Woman Breath Holding Underwater Stock Photos and Images

(232) Narrow your search: Page 1 of 3

  • Young sportive girl in bikini in action. Fit woman swim underwater, dive under breaking ocean wave. Healthy lifestyle. Water sports, extreme surfing
  • Woman diving underwater.
  • Funny face portrait of girl swimming and diving in blue pool with fun – jumping deep down underwater with splashes and foam.
  • Young Woman And Boy Holding Breath Underwater
  • Girl swimming underwater, holiday her nose
  • Woman holding breath under water
  • Woman in swimming pool
  • Fit woman training underwater with a rock
  • Woman swimming floating underwater, (low angle view)
  • Woman wearing horned headdress holding axe underwater in swimming pool
  • Woman swimming underwater
  • Female swimmers racing underwater in pool
  • Woman wearing horned headdress holding axe underwater in swimming pool
  • greece cyclades sikinos a woman spearfishing
  • Woman kneeling underwater in swimming pool holding ball
  • Female swimmers racing underwater in pool
  • Underwater view of woman in purple dress poised by shipwrecked boat, Bahamas
  • greece cyclades sikinos a woman spearfishing
  • Underwater side view of mid adult woman wearing high heels and sunglasses in swimming pool sitting on chair looking at camera
  • Female swimmer underwater in pool
  • Young woman female swimming underwater on holiday wearing a bikini – France
  • Underwater front view of mid adult woman wearing high heels and sunglasses in swimming pool sitting on chair looking at camera
  • Woman swimming underwater, (low angle view)
  • Young woman swimming underwater in ocean
  • Young woman female swimming underwater on holiday wearing a bikini – France
  • Woman wearing dress underwater in swimming pool with roses
  • Woman swimming underwater in swimming pool, full length, high angle view
  • Woman wearing bikini underwater in swimming pool, eyes open
  • Woman swimming underwater in the sea, Apulia, Italy
  • Woman underwater in swimming pool wearing colourful outfit
  • Woman swimming underwater in swimming pool, full length, high angle view
  • Woman swimming underwater in the sea, Apulia, Italy
  • Woman underwater in swimming pool sitting on red plastic chair
  • Woman swimming underwater in ocean, Bugibba, Malta
  • Female swimmer racing underwater in pool
  • Woman holding breath underwater, arms outstretched
  • greece cyclades sikinos mixed race teenager underwater
  • Woman scuba diver, using a blue mask, holding the regulator on one hand and smiling to the camera on a deep blue ocean, in Mexico (Cozumel island).
  • Female swimmer racing underwater in pool
  • greece cyclades sikinos mixed race teenager underwater
  • Pregnant woman wearing red high heels and bikini in swimming pool
  • Swimmer diving, underwater
  • greece cyclades sikinos mixed race teenager underwater
  • Underwater view of female free diver in bikini looking back at reef sharks, Bahamas
  • Underwater view of female free diver standing on seabed surrounded by reef sharks, Bahamas
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Underwater view of female free diver moving up towards sun rays, New Providence, Bahamas
  • Underwater view of a woman in a swimming pool coming up for air
  • Underwater view of female free diver with underwater camera, Bimini, Bahamas
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Young Woman Diving In The Sea
  • Woman underwater
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Young Woman In Sunny Swimming Pool
  • Close-up of young woman swimming above young man in pool, underwater.
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Woman coming up for air in pool, back view
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Funny girl swimming, diving in blue pool with fun. Jumping deep down under water. Underwater swimming lesson. Family lifestyle.
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Female swimmer in pool
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Mother and child smiling under water
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Freediver heads to the bottom
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Mom and 4 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Snorkeler approaches coral reef
  • A woman floating underwater in a pool.
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Snorkeler views coral reef
  • Woman pushing a man’s head in the pool
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Woman diver in a glass tank
  • Water Sport Woman in Purple Swim Suit doing exercise underwater in a Swimming Blue Pool
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Side view of a woman swimming underwater
  • Bare legs and feet of woman swimming underwater in spa swimming pool with orchids
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Teenage girl, underwater in a swimming pool
  • Neck down view of woman swimming underwater in spa swimming pool with orchids
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Young woman in bikini blowing bubbles underwater as she fins towards the surface, Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico
  • Swimming Underwater
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Couple in a pool, man in water
  • Pregnant Woman Underwater
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • Underwater photo of a young couple holding their breath during swimming in the sea
  • Pregnant Woman Underwater
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • woman swimming underwater
  • Pregnant Woman Underwater
  • 6 months infant learning to swim underwater in waterbaby class in the pool, Eastern Europe, Ukraine
  • A Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and snorkeller interacting.
  • 2 years girl learning to swim underwater in the pool, Odessa, Ukraine

Recent searches:

Search Results for Woman Breath Holding Underwater Stock Photos and Images

(232) Page 1 of 3123

Girls holding breath underwater

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *