Size Does Matter (for Squat-Proof Leggings)

It can be frustrating to read reviews that rave about a particular pair of squat-proof leggings, and then later find that other reviewers for that same pair of leggings make the claim that the leggings definitely are not squat proof. How can this be?

A large part of it has to do with size.
Choosing the right size with compression fabrics or your athleisure outfits is extremely important if you want to maintain some level of modesty.

Sometimes product design, not price, causes a lack of squat-proof-ness. (You may remember back in 2013 when Lululemon recalled some of their leggings because they were a little too sheer and revealed a little too much during those downward dogs or uneventful strolls on a sunny day.) When leggings are squat proof for some and not for others, there is something else going on.

What is Squat-Proof (Leggings)?

First, what does it mean to be squat-proof? It simply means that when we perform a move, such as a squat or one of the many yoga poses that cause our leggings to stretch across our bottom, others cannot see through to our panties or skin. Think about it this way, a pair of sheer stockings is definitely not squat-proof, but a pair of opaque tights usually is. When wearing leggings, most of us would prefer the opaque look so we can move with confidence and not have to be self-conscious about our panty choices.
Why Choosing The Right Size (Leggings) Matters

While thickness is one contributing factor, sufficient stretch is another. Leggings’ stretch performance is often in the 1 – 3-inch range, sometimes more, sometimes less. While the leggings may continue to stretch beyond that point, the performance, including opaqueness can start to erode – they may no longer be squat-proof beyond the stretch performance limit. And that’s where size comes in. Just because your sports leggings have room for a little more stretch in them, doesn’t mean you should use it all, especially, if you want to keep your private parts private.

So, always buy your leggings in the correct size to keep them squat-proof. And how do you do that…?

What is the Right Size For Squat-Proofing Your Leggings?

First, forget about the “size you normally wear” with your sports leggings. Yes, we want you to look cute, but today we’re talking about performance. When you are buying performance sports leggings, “always” start by checking the sizing charts posted by online and offline sports apparel retailers.

This step is frequently missed when choosing the right performance leggings because many women automatically default to the “size they normally wear”. In fact, with leggings, the hip measurement is the most important metric to consider for squat-proofing. Select the size according to the chart that best matches your hip measurement. You will notice that most charts have measurements that overlap a little between sizes. If your measurements are at the upper end of the scale for a size, consider going with the larger size to ensure adequate stretch when you begin to move.

Worrying about whether you are flashing your bottom is a real drain on your energy and your workout suffer. Next time you buy a pair of leggings that you want high performance from during your workouts, think…

“Size Does Matter” and check the charts

Happy squatting!

(or downward dogging or deadlifting or toe touching or …) Grab Some Squat-Proof Leggings Today

Leggings are a divisive topic. The New York Times came out with an op-ed earlier this year titled “Why Yoga Pants Are Bad for Women,” and Who What Wear editors were quick to respond with their own opinions. Personally, as someone who regularly goes on hikes and to classes at Body by Simone, leggings are a staple in my wardrobe.

I also wear them when I’m not working out, but I realize that this, too, is a topic with lots of opinions. Man Repeller penned a story “How to Wear Leggings as Pants” to break down why leggings should be considered pants, explaining, “All it takes is the willingness to withstand at least one comment like, ‘Did you forget to get changed all the way after the gym?’”

Even the über-stylish Lauren Santo Domingo has owned up to wearing them outside of the gym. In a Vogue story, she explained that in the mornings she has a “New York City routine of throwing on a pair of leggings and an oversize sweater to run out for a paper cup of coffee.” Same—and when I’m choosing the leggings, I’ve found that a high-waisted silhouette in a solid color is the easiest option for an outfit that will read as put-together.

Ahead, see how I’m wearing them and shop my edit of the best styles.

High waisted workout leggings

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *