Training for a Triathlon

It was once regarded as a multi-sport braved only by the super-humanly fit. But recently, the triathlon has become the consummate “me-too” phenomenon, attracting those who crave extra motivation, new challenges or the breathtaking body-sculpting benefits such a competition gives.

When you engage in a program comprising swimming, cycling and running, you won’t just get fit. You’ll be rewarded mentally, spiritually and socially, and become more confident than you’ve ever been in your life, says Julie Moss, age 45, a triathlete in Santa Cruz, Calif.

SWIMMING WORKOUTS

The swim, which comes first in any triathlon, is the shortest part of the event. Do most of your workouts in a pool, but practice in a lake or ocean at least two times before the triathlon. If you’re a poor swimmer, a wet suit can increase your buoyancy and will protect you from the elements.

Swim 1: Drill 50s

What you’ll do After a slow 5- to 10-minute warm-up swim, complete 6-12 50-yard swims (50 yards equals 2 laps in a standard Olympic-sized pool) at an easy to moderate pace. Swim with smooth, elongated strokes, rolling side-to-side. Afterward, cool down.

Heart rate 40-50 percent of your maximum heart rate (MHR is estimated by subtracting your age from 220.)

RPE 3-4

Duration 20-30 minutes

Calories burned 120-225 (Calorie estimates are based on a 145-pound woman)

Swim 2: Negative-Splits (Intervals)

What you’ll do After a 10- to 15-minute warm-up, complete 2-4 200-yard swims (200 yards equals 8 laps). Within each 200-yard interval, swim the first 100 yards slower than the second: Stop between each 200-yard swim and recover completely by hanging onto the wall (if in a pool) and allowing your breathing to return to a comfortable level. As you gain fitness, mix in easy swimming or treading water as part of your recovery. Afterward, cool down thoroughly.

Heart rate 70-80 percent of your MHR for the work interval; 50 percent during the rest interval.

RPE 6-7 for the work interval; drop down to a very easy 2-3 for the rest interval.

Duration 30-45 minutes

Calories burned 300-450

CYCLING WORKOUTS

Cycling comes next in the triathlon, and while it is the longest portion of the event, most agree it’s also the easiest. Just remember, you’ll still need to run for a few miles after biking, so save something for that finish! You can use a mountain bike, but using a road bike will make things easier because the road bike is lighter and the tires dramatically reduce rolling resistance. If you live in a cold or wet climate, you can perform all of your cycling training on an indoor bike.

Bike 1: The Soft-Pedal

What you’ll do Pedal in nice, smooth circles with minimum effort over flat terrain, or with minimal resistance on a stationary bike. You won’t need to warm up or cool down (but do stretch afterward).

Heart rate 30-40 percent of your MHR

RPE 2-3

Duration 20-30 minutes

Calories burned 100-180

Bike 2: Cruise Intervals

What you’ll do After a 10- to 15-minute warm-up, stretch or shake out any areas that feel sore or tight. Next, ride moderately hard for 5 minutes, and then either pedal at an easy effort (RPE 2-3) or stop riding completely, taking time to recover. Repeat 2-4 times, then cool down thoroughly.

Heart rate 70-80 percent of your MHR for the work interval; allow your heart rate to fall below 50 percent during the rest interval.

RPE 6-7 for the work interval; 2-3 for the rest interval

Duration 45-60 minutes

Calories burned 400-700

RUNNING WORKOUTS

Running is the most physically and mentally demanding part of any triathlon. Fortunately, it only lasts 2-4 miles in a short-distance triathlon, and you can walk much of that if you’re feeling tired. However, if you’re true to your endurance run (which you’ll do every week), you ought to have no trouble finishing. Do not work out in walking or cross-training shoes; you absolutely must train and race in running-specific shoes that suit your biomechanics. Go to your local running store (or visit roadrunnersports.com) and seek expert help in choosing shoes.

Run 1: Tempo

What you’ll do After a 10- to 15-minute warm-up, settle into a moderately hard running pace for 5-20 minutes. Keep your rhythm steady and focus on breathing deeply and maintaining proper running form (torso erect, shoulders and hands relaxed, with arms moving forward, elbows bent at 90 degrees, feet rolling heel-to-toe with a natural stride). Perform this workout every other week, and cool down thoroughly afterward.

Heart rate 70-80 percent of your MHR

RPE 6-7

Duration 15-35 minutes

Calories burned 200-400

Run 2: Endurance

What you’ll do After warming up, go for a long, moderately easy run. Long runs forge the physical strength and mental fortitude you need to endure the final stretches of the triathlon. Over the 6 weeks, build up the duration of this run to 1 hour or more, but don’t increase the duration by more than 10 percent a week. Pay close attention to your heart rate during your long runs to prevent overtraining. It’s perfectly acceptable — and smart — to walk portions of your long runs. Afterward, cool down.

Heart rate 50-60 percent of your MHR

RPE 4-5

Duration 45-60 minutes

Calories burned 350-550

THE PLAN: your training schedule

Over the course of six weeks you’ll complete 5 of the 6 cardio workouts (swimming, cycling or running) described in this program each week.

WEEK 1:

2 swims

2 bike rides

1 endurance run

WEEK 2

1 swim

2 bike rides

2 runs

WEEK 3

2 swims

2 bike rides 1 endurance run

WEEK 4

2 swims

1 bike ride

2 runs

WEEK 5

2 swims

2 bike rides

1 endurance run

WEEK 6

1 swim

2 bike rides

2 runs

Strength

Complement this plan with 2 total-body strength workouts a week on nonconsecutive days, and on the same days that you do your shorter cardio workout. Take the other 2 days off.

Warm-up

Begin each workout with 5-15 minutes of easy swimming, biking or walking/running, depending on which workout you’re doing. The more intense your workout, the longer you should warm up.

Cool-down

End every workout with another 5-10 minutes at an easy pace, followed by stretches for all the muscles you’ve just worked. Hold each stretch for 20-30 seconds without bouncing; repeat 2-3 more times.

Note The duration of each workout includes the warm-up and cool-down.

Triathlon tips

For more information, visit the following Web sites:

insidetriathlon.com The inside scoop on training techniques, nutrition and gear. active.com Search and register online for hundreds of fitness events across the country. danskin.com/triathlon For women of all levels, this sprint-distance triathlon is the largest multisport series in the world.

The Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE)

In this six-week program, you can gauge your intensity using the Rate of PercAdC 9/19eived Exertion and/or a percentage of your maximum heart rate. Here’s what the numbers mean:

%MHR: 20-30

Intensity: Very easy; you can converse with no effort.

%MHR: 40

Intensity: Easy; you can converse with almost no effort.

%MHR: 50

Intensity: Moderately easy; you can converse comfortably with little effort.

%MHR: 60

Intensity: Moderate; conversation requires some effort.

%MHR: 70

Intensity: Moderately hard; conversation requires quite a bit of effort.

%MHR: 80

Intensity: Difficult; conversation requires a lot of effort.

%MHR: 85-90

Intensity: Peak effort; no-talking zone

In a swimming pool, a lap is the same as a length

In contrast to politics, religion, and proper front-crawl technique, some issues are black and white. Some “debates” are not actually debates, but rather, cases in which a single correct answer exists, but some folks haven’t found Jesus yet.

The occasional confusion over Lap vs. Length is one of those cases.

In a swimming pool, “lap” is synonymous with “length.”

In common usage, a “lap” means a completion of the course. In a pool, the “course” is the pool itself, from one end to the other. Therefore, a lap is one length.

Some people think a “lap” is two lengths of the pool. They are wrong. In an Olympic-size 50-meter pool, one lap is 50 meters. In an American short-course 25-yard pool, a lap is 25 yards.

I didn’t always see eye-to-eye with the late, great Terry Laughlin, but here we agree: the notion that a lap is two lengths of the pool may derive from a false analogy to looped tracks such as those in running, horse racing, and car racing.

Terry writes:

In running, you complete a lap by circling a track — which brings you back to where you started. That seems to have influenced many people who are new to swimming to think you need to return to where you started in order to complete a lap.
Swimming is different. You swim a straight, not looped course. But in swimming, as well as running, completing a LAP means completing the COURSE.

Some illustrations:

Steven Munatones writes (note, this was published two days after the present article):

I grew up in Southern California where competitive swimmers refer to one lap as one length of a pool. It is most often seen during competitive swimming competitions in the distance freestyle race where swimmers are reminded of the number of lengths of the pool they have swum with lap counters.
Competitive swimmers and coaches count 20 laps for a 500-yard swim in a 25-yard pool and 30 laps for a 1500-meter freestyle in a 50m pool. That is how I was taught back in the 1960s and 1970s.

2008 Olympian, FINA 25km World Champion, and current Santa Barbara Swim Club head coach Mark Warkentin writes (via personal communication):

Lap = length in my opinion.
I think the curve of a turn on the race tracks is a significant difference. In a pool there is no difference in what happens between odd lengths and even lengths.

Again, this is not a real debate among experienced swimmers. But don’t take my word, or Terry’s word, or Steven’s word, or Mark’s word for it. The NPR podcast How To Do Everything does an entertaining investigation of the issue.

A father of an 11-year old competitive swimmer calls in, hoping to resolve a disagreement with his son about how many lengths are in a lap. The father thinks a lap is two lengths. Listen:

Your browser does not support the audio element.

(If the audio controls don’t work in your browser, go to . The segments starts at about 4 min, 37 sec into the podcast.)

Then the hosts interview the son (Henry), who has been taught correctly by his coaches that a lap is the same as a length. Listen:

Your browser does not support the audio element.

Finally, the hosts talk to 12-time Olympic medalist Natalie Coughlin to resolve the issue. Listen:

Your browser does not support the audio element.

Natalie is quite clear:

A lap refers to swimming from one end of the pool to the next. Without a doubt, it’s one end of the pool to the other. It’s not back and forth.

If you polled Natalie’s peers on the U.S. National Team (or any other national team), 100% of them would say the same thing. Incidentally, Natalie also makes the important point that experienced swimmers don’t talk in terms of “laps” or “lengths” – they refer to distances. Four laps/lengths of a long-course pool is simply: “a 200.”

Now, at your local lap pool among casual swimmers or triathletes, you may hear different ideas, creating the appearance of a “debate.” It is not a debate. Sorry!

Sadly, even the Oxford English Dictionary confuses the issue:

A stage in a swim consisting of two lengths (or one length) of a pool.

The OED entry may be citing common usage, but unfortunately, one of these usages is incorrect. If a lap is “two lengths or one length” of a pool, then the word is meaningless.

Here is a device used in pool-based distance events such as the mile. It is called a lap counter. Why? Because it counts laps (which are the same as lengths).

Why is the lap counter only capable of displaying odd numbers? Because the lap counter is always shown to the swimmer at the opposite end from the starting block – when the swimmer is finishing odd laps/lengths of the race.

Why does the lap counter go up to 69? Because there are 66 laps/lengths (of 25 yards) in the 1650-yard freestyle. Not 33.

What would you call a 50m sprint in an Olympic pool? This is one lap. Nobody ever calls this “half a lap.”

(Added March 20)

In general, we can define a “lap” as the completion of a basic, indivisible course. In a pool, only the one-way length is indivisible; two lengths can be subdivided into two identical one-way lengths.

To be clear, it’s not just Californians, or Americans, or even pool swimmers who define laps this way.

Australian Chloe McCardel’s record Bondi Beach swim in 2011 was described by both Chloe and the journalists covering her as “60 laps” of the beach – with a single lap defined as one end of the beach to the other (approx. 800 meters).

Convert meters to lap [olympic pool] –
Conversion of Measurement Units

›› Convert metre to lap

Did you mean to convert meters to lap
lap
lap

›› More information from the unit converter

How many meters in 1 lap ? The answer is 100.
We assume you are converting between metre and lap .
You can view more details on each measurement unit:
meters or lap
The SI base unit for length is the metre.
1 metre is equal to 1 meters, or 0.01 lap .
Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.
Use this page to learn how to convert between metres and laps.
Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!

›› Quick conversion chart of meters to lap

1 meters to lap = 0.01 lap

10 meters to lap = 0.1 lap

50 meters to lap = 0.5 lap

100 meters to lap = 1 lap

200 meters to lap = 2 lap

500 meters to lap = 5 lap

1000 meters to lap = 10 lap

›› Want other units?

You can do the reverse unit conversion from lap to meters, or enter any two units below:

›› Common length conversions

meters to pole
meters to twip
meters to arsheen
meters to didot point
meters to metric mile
meters to heer
meters to span
meters to fall
meters to braza
meters to hand

›› Definition: Meter

The metre, symbol: m, is the basic unit of distance (or of “length”, in the parlance of the physical sciences) in the International System of Units. The internationally-accepted spelling of the unit in English is “metre”, although the American English spelling meter is a common variant. However, both American and non-American forms of English agree that the spelling “meter” should be used as a suffix in the names of measuring devices such as chronometers and micrometers.

›› Metric conversions and more

ConvertUnits.com provides an online conversion calculator for all types of measurement units. You can find metric conversion tables for SI units, as well as English units, currency, and other data. Type in unit symbols, abbreviations, or full names for units of length, area, mass, pressure, and other types. Examples include mm, inch, 100 kg, US fluid ounce, 6’3″, 10 stone 4, cubic cm, metres squared, grams, moles, feet per second, and many more!

Convert · Length · Dates · Salary · Chemistry · Forum · Privacy · Bibliography · Contact
© 2020 ConvertUnits.com

Next Distance Swim: Sunday 29th March 2020 (Long Distance Swim)

1. Listen to lane recorder when they are giving instructions.
2. Keep to the sides of the pool section and only use middle of pool section for over taking.
3. Stopping early and walking to the end to shout number can result in disqualification.
4. Any contact with pool floor during the distance swim can also lead to disqualification.
5. Pupils must swim a recognised stroke on all distances over 200 metres.
6. Lane recorders and poolside swim leaders have the right to end the distance swim
of a participant if a parent interrupts them during the swim.
7. The distance calculated during the swim will be the distance awarded.
8. Swimmers completing distances under 100m may use any method of moving
through the water. Over 200m, swimmers must swim recognised strokes in accordance
to the award they are currently working towards.
9. Certificates & badges awarded on a distance swim evening will cost £1.50.

Distance Swimming Awards

100 metres – Badge and certificate – 4 Lengths
200 metres – badge and certificate – 8 Lengths
400 metres – badge and certificate – 16 Lengths
600 metres – badge and certificate – 24 Lengths
800 metres – badge and certificate – 32 Lengths
1000 metres – badge and certificate – 40 Lengths
1500 metres – badge and certificate – 60 Lengths
1 mile – badge and certificate – 64 Lengths

2000 metres – badge and certificate – 80 Lengths
2500 metres – badge and certificate – 100 Lengths
3000 metres – badge and certificate – 120 Lengths
4000 metres – badge and certificate – 160 Lengths
5000 metres – badge and certificate – 200 Lengths

Convert 200 km to miles – Conversion of
Measurement Units

›› Convert kilometre to mile

How many km in 1 miles? The answer is 1.609344.
We assume you are converting between kilometre and mile.
You can view more details on each measurement unit:
km or miles
The SI base unit for length is the metre.
1 metre is equal to 0.001 km, or 0.00062137119223733 miles.
Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.
Use this page to learn how to convert between kilometres and miles.
Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!

›› Quick conversion chart of km to miles

1 km to miles = 0.62137 miles

5 km to miles = 3.10686 miles

10 km to miles = 6.21371 miles

20 km to miles = 12.42742 miles

30 km to miles = 18.64114 miles

40 km to miles = 24.85485 miles

50 km to miles = 31.06856 miles

75 km to miles = 46.60284 miles

100 km to miles = 62.13712 miles

You can do the reverse unit conversion from miles to km, or enter any two units below:

km to fist
km to cuerda
km to zettameter
km to pie
km to bohr
km to Scots mile
km to block
km to sagene
km to pulgada
km to story

›› Definition: Kilometer

A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer, symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). It is approximately equal to 0.621 miles, 1094 yards or 3281 feet.

›› Definition: Mile

A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. Today, one mile is mainly equal to about 1609 m on land and 1852 m at sea and in the air, but see below for the details. The abbreviation for mile is ‘mi’. There are more specific definitions of ‘mile’ such as the metric mile, statute mile, nautical mile, and survey mile. On this site, we assume that if you only specify ‘mile’ you want the statute mile.

ConvertUnits.com provides an online conversion calculator for all types of measurement units. You can find metric conversion tables for SI units, as well as English units, currency, and other data. Type in unit symbols, abbreviations, or full names for units of length, area, mass, pressure, and other types. Examples include mm, inch, 100 kg, US fluid ounce, 6’3″, 10 stone 4, cubic cm, metres squared, grams, moles, feet per second, and many more!

Convert · Length · Dates · Salary · Chemistry · Forum · Privacy · Bibliography · Contact
© 2020 ConvertUnits.com

How long is 200 yards

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *