IVF Cost: How to Calculate and Prepare for IVF Expenses

“In vitro fertilization is when the eggs are removed from the ovaries and fertilized in an embryology lab. The embryos created are cultured to a multi-cell stage called a blastocyst, which is transferred back into the uterus,” explains Tiffanny Jones, MD, a reproductive endocrinologist and fertility expert at Dallas IVF. The eggs can be fertilized with the partner’s sperm or a donor’s and returned to the patient’s uterus or a surrogate’s.

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Understanding IVF Cost

  • IVF is medicine: It’s a medical procedure or procedures conducted by highly trained doctors. Like any specialized treatment, it can be expensive.
  • It adds up: Multistep, complex treatments generally cost more; each procedure adds a discrete cost to the total.
  • It takes time and commitment: IVF is a two-week procedure, requiring consistent daily injections.
  • It may not work: It’s an advanced treatment, but it’s not 100 percent successful. Patients who have been struggling to conceive for years may pay an emotional price if the outcome is not a success.

However it’s accomplished, IVF has costs associated with each step of the process. For instance, collecting eggs to be fertilized requires injectable medications. Those drugs alone can cost $4,000 to $8,000 per cycle. Once harvested, eggs may be fertilized with conventional insemination where eggs and sperm are placed in the same receptacle and allowed to do their thing. However, if the conventional method doesn’t work, doctors may choose intracellular sperm insemination, or ICSI, where a single sperm is placed directly into a mature egg for fertilization. That can run from $1,000 to $2,000. There is also a technique called “assisted hatching,” where the outer shell of an embryo is either chemically or mechanically broken to allow the embryo to “hatch” more easily. This is commonly done on eggs from older women or on embryos that were created from frozen eggs. This procedure also carries its own cost of around $450.

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There are also office visits and ultrasound appointments to consider, possibly many, each carrying a price largely dependent on the provider. Additionally, some prospective parents may opt for genetic testing, which can be conducted before implantation and render amniocentesis unnecessary. This screening can range from $1,500 to $5,000 or possibly more, depending on the number of embryos and type of test.

IVF can get expensive quickly and can easily exceed $15,000.

“There are some mandated states where infertility must be covered. As of now, I believe there are only 15 states and not all of them offer full coverage for IVF,” says Jones. “Initial screening tests are covered by most insurances. Companies like Google and Facebook even cover freezing eggs to use for later. I have seen some couples get everything paid for, including genetic testing.”

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Money is a big consideration, but not the only one. IVF is a serious time commitment that can dictate a patient’s schedule for several weeks.

“IVF takes about 2 weeks: 10 to 12 days of injectables, then five days to grow the embryo and transfer it into the uterus,” explains Jones. “A women usually gets a blood test and an ultrasound every other day during the 10 to 12 days of injectables. They have to be willing to take injections two to three times per day. Timing of medications is very important, so if they go out of town, they must remember all of their medications. It can be very difficult to get the medications; most pharmacies do not carry them.”

But this investment of time and money isn’t the only cost. IVF is incredibly advanced, but it’s not a sure thing. And this long process can take an emotional toll.

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Many women struggling with infertility turn to in vitro fertilization (IVF), but are hit with sticker shock when they pick up their meds and receive their medical bill. Not only does IVF have a high price tag, but the cost of treatment and the associated medications are often not covered by insurance. According to a GoodRx analysis, IVF drug list prices have gone up 50% since 2014, and much of this increase is due to the lack of affordable generic alternatives for fertility medications.

So, as prices continue to rise, what should you expect to pay for IVF medications? And are there ways to save if you don’t have insurance coverage? Let’s find out.

What is in vitro fertilization?

Put simply, this therapy involves retrieving a woman’s eggs, fertilizing them with sperm in a lab, and developing them into healthy embryos to be implanted inside her uterus.

This process comes with a whole host of tests, medications, and doctor visits. According to FertilityIQ, one IVF cycle can cost $23,474 on average, and you will typically need more than 1 cycle for a successful pregnancy.

What drugs are used in an IVF cycle?

The type, duration, and order of medications differ from patient to patient. But in general, drugs are an important part of the egg retrieval portion of the IVF process. Your provider will prescribe certain medications for you depending on your specific needs during the egg retrieval process. They may also prescribe medications to be used after the embryo is implanted to support pregnancy.

We’ll walk through the medications used in egg retrieval, then review drugs typically used in the embryo implant phase.

Egg retrieval

The egg retrieval process can be broken down into 3 phases: suppression, stimulation, and the triggering of egg release. Depending on the protocol your provider selects, either the suppression or stimulation phase comes first. The triggering of egg release phase is always last.

Suppression phase

One of the first steps in IVF is to suppress ovulation (the natural cycle of when a mature egg is released from the ovary for fertilization). This is necessary to allow for multiple eggs to develop at the same time for retrieval.

To achieve this, you are prescribed medications that block ovulation. These medications are known as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists. What you’re prescribed depends on the IVF protocol that your provider chooses for you.

Below are the typical medications used for suppression and their prices.

Ganirelix and Cetrotide

Ganirelix and Cetrotide are GnRH antagonists. In short, they work to suppress the release of hormones that trigger ovulation. Ganirelix has an average cash price of around $258 per syringe, and Cetrotide has a cash price of around $279 per vial. Both medications usually contain 1 to 2 doses depending on the protocol, so you will likely need to purchase multiple syringes or vials per cycle.

Both Cetrotide and Ganirelix require you to self-inject. However, Ganirelix comes packaged as a pre-filled syringe, while Cetrotide requires you to dissolve the powder and mix the solution before injecting.

Luckily, if you are struggling to afford Cetrotide, you have some options. If you don’t have insurance or your insurance does not cover Cetrotide, the manufacturer has a program that offers savings or rebates.

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Leuprolide

Leuprolide is a GnRH agonist. It works by initially increasing the production of hormones that trigger ovulation. Over time, your body adapts to this stimulation by stopping the production of these hormones, leading to a delay in ovulation.

Leuprolide comes in a vial with multiple doses. The average cash price this past year for a multi-dose vial of leuprolide was $2,338. While a single vial of leuprolide is priced higher than Ganirelix and Cetrotide, leuprolide contains multiple doses per vial compared to only 1 to 2 doses per vial of Ganirelix or Cetrotide. You will need to measure your dose with a syringe for self-injection.

Stimulation phase

In addition to suppressing ovulation, it is crucial to mature multiple eggs for retrieval because eggs can be lost in the process of IVF. In order to do so, FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and/or human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG) are used to cause a higher number of follicles (sacs in the ovary containing the immature eggs) to mature.

The stimulation phase can happen either before or after the suppression phase depending on the protocol. By far, this stage has some of the most expensive drugs.

Gonal-F and Gonal-F RFF

Both Gonal-F and Gonal-F RFF are copies of the natural FSH hormone responsible for egg stimulation. What differs is how they are packaged. Gonal-F RFF is available in a pen form for ease of administration. One 450 iU Gonal-F vial is $1,337, and one 450 iU Gonal-F RFF pen is $1,331. They are similarly priced, and both require self-injection. However, the vial form involves dissolving the powder and mixing the solution prior to injecting.

If you don’t have insurance or your insurance does not cover Gonal-F or Gonal-f RFF, the manufacturer has a program that offers savings or rebates.

Follistim AQ

Follistim AQ is also a copy of FSH, which again is the hormone responsible for egg stimulation. It comes in pre-filled cartridges and needles to be used with the Follistim AQ pen for injection. While there are differing amounts of Follistim AQ sold, 1 cartridge of 300 iU costs $884. The price for the medication will ultimately depend on the number of doses and the dose needed.

If you have commercial insurance, the manufacturer of Follistim AQ offers savings on out-of-pocket costs.

Menopur

Human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG) is another type of medication that can also be used to stimulate egg growth. hMG differs from the other stimulation drugs because it contains both FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH). A low amount of LH is needed to support egg maturation. Menopur is currently the only version of hMG on the market.

The price per vial is $237; however, you may need multiple vials per injection depending on your dose. Therefore, while a Menopur vial costs less than the other FSH vials, your may need to purchase multiple Menopur vials per injection.

Menopur vials contain a powder that needs to be mixed before self-injection.

Triggering of egg release phase

The final step in the egg collection process is the triggering phase. Medications containing the hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger the eggs to go through the final phase of growth and trigger the ovaries to release mature eggs after about 36 hours. Then, the eggs are retrieved by the fertility doctor.

You typically need only one dose of hCG, but only brand-name hCG medications are currently available on the market. Their prices are listed below.

Novarel and Pregnyl

Novarel and Pregnyl are both vial forms of hCG. They need to be mixed before filling a syringe for self-injection.

A vial of Novarel with 10,000 units has a cash price of $306, while a vial of Pregnyl with 10,000 units has cash price of $134. Novarel is also available as a vial with 5,000 units with cash price of $172.

Ovidrel

There is only one form of Ovidrel, and it comes as a pre-filled syringe of hCG for self-injection, making it much easier to administer. One 250 mcg syringe is $203.

If you don’t have insurance or your insurance does not cover Ovidrel, the manufacturer has a program that offers savings or rebates.

Embryo implantation

After the eggs are retrieved and fertilized with sperm in the lab, the final step is to implant the embryo in the uterus.

To further support the embryo transfer, your provider may prescribe progesterone supplementation up until the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. Why is this necessary? Because IVF medications for egg retrieval can actually decrease progesterone levels in your body, and progesterone is a hormone that prepares the lining of the uterus to allow for the implantation of the embryo.

The costs of progesterone drugs are listed below.

Progesterone and Prometrium

Both progesterone and Prometrium come in a capsule form of either 100 mg or 200 mg. However, progesterone is the generic and much cheaper version of Prometrium. For example, one 100 mg capsule of Progesterone is $2, while one 100 mg capsule of Prometrium is $13. Progesterone also comes in a vial for self-injection, which contains multiple doses.

Crinone and Endometrin

Crinone and Endometrin contain progesterone and are inserted vaginally. Crinone is available as an applicator with gel at one end for ease of administration. It is available at a 4% and an 8% concentration, costing $47 and $29 per applicator, respectively. Endometrin is available as a vaginal insert (tablet) that you put on the end of an applicator for administration. It is priced per insert at $14.

For either Crinone or Endometrin, you must pay per applicator or insert, and you usually need multiple doses. And while Endometrin is cheaper per dose, you usually need to take it 2 to 3 times a day, whereas you usually take Crinone only once a day.

If Crinone is too expensive, you can consider using Endometrin because the manufacturer has a patient savings program available for commercially insured or non-insured patients.

So, how can I save on my IVF medications?

Overall, fertility medications and the entire IVF process are no small expense. All in all, it is important to educate yourself on the process and the associated costs so you can save. Our tips are below.

  • Shop around. Prescription drug prices can vary from one pharmacy to the next, so it pays to shop around before you buy. Make sure you check for GoodRx coupons to get a discount off the retail price.
  • Use manufacturer coupons. Check out the links in this article to manufacturer savings on fertility medications.
  • Start a conversation with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. If you’re having trouble affording your prescription, let your healthcare provider know. They can help you work through insurance coverage issues and/or find affordable alternative medications for you. In addition, some medications used for the stimulation phase (Gonal-F, Gonal-F RFF, Follistim AQ) are overfilled, so they actually contain more medication than what’s listed on the label. You may be able to get an extra partial or full dose depending on how much you need per injection. Talk to your doctor or nurse to see if you can use the extra medication to get an extra dose.
  • Doctor’s samples. Ask your doctor for any samples of medication that are part of your IVF protocol. You may be able to get extra doses of medication.
  • Use insurance. If you have insurance, you can check with your insurance company to see if a fertility drug is covered and how much it will be.

Here are some other great resources to learn about IVF:

  • FertilityIQ
  • NYTimes

– – –

Co-contributor: Jennifer Tran, PharmD

Methodology:

This GoodRx analysis is based on a representative sample of U.S. prescription fills (not GoodRx fills) and comes from several sources, including pharmacies and insurers. The reported prices in this article are based on average cash prices, the so-called “usual and customary” prices or retail prices at the pharmacy (not including insurance copays or coinsurance). All prices listed on this article are based on data from October 1, 2018 to September 30, 2019. The prices presented are based on the smallest unit of the drug that can be filled.
A note about IVF drug use: The total price of prescription drugs for IVF will vary because the dosing and the course of drugs will differ based on a provider’s recommendation to a patient. We base our IVF process information on several sources including FertilityIQ and multiple published reviews in the medical literature. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

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  • Why So Many Women Travel to Denmark for Fertility Treatments

    Holly Ryan knows the biological father of her children has two sisters, is a Coldplay fan, and doesn’t like eating chicken in pasta dishes. She knows his mother is a nurse and his father is a policeman, and that his aunt has green eyes and curly hair. She even has a photo of him as a child, and an audio recording of his voice.

    But Ryan, 41, doesn’t know his name and has never met him. More than six years ago, she decided she wanted to start a family. “Once you commit to trying to get pregnant, it becomes a kind of obsession,” says Ryan, the director of a talent agency for TV directors, producers and editors. “As a single, gay woman, I knew in order to get from A to B, I had to be strategic about the quickest and least murky route, which I concluded was online shopping for a sperm donor.”

    Like thousands of women in Europe each year, Ryan turned to Denmark. Today, the Nordic country of 5.7 million people has the greatest proportion of babies born through assisted reproductive technology (ART) — while approximately 1.7% of all infants born in the U.S. are conceived using ART, an estimated 8 to 10% of Danish babies are born thanks to these techniques — but it’s not just the residents who benefit from its treatment options, notably its booming sperm industry. With some of the world’s most liberal legislation on fertility treatment, as well as a less stigmatized culture around the procedures, Denmark has become an attractive destination for women from other countries as well.

    “In terms of fertility, people in Denmark are just more open-minded and less judgmental,” Ryan says.

    An insemination room at StorkKlinik VivaNeo in Copenhagen. StorkKlinik VivaNeo

    If not for the women wearing white lab coats, StorkKlinik, a private fertility clinic in central Copenhagen, would feel more like a boutique hotel than a medical facility. The clinic is decorated with stylish Scandinavian furniture, soft lighting, and leafy green plants. Contemporary art covers the walls — even in the treatment rooms, where extra-wide medical beds (without stirrups) allow couples to lie and cuddle together so that the insemination procedure feels less clinical.

    As in most countries, the vast majority of people using ART in Denmark are heterosexual couples. But StorkKlinik, founded in 1999 by the aptly named Nina Stork, has always focused on helping single and lesbian women become parents, groups that still make up at least half of their patients. At that clinic, patients coming from abroad — mostly from Sweden, Germany, Norway, France, Switzerland and the United Kingdom — received more than 90% of the 3,930 in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intrauterine insemination (IUI) treatments in 2017.

    Ryan was one of them. After giving birth to her first son, Johan, in 2014 after IUI treatment at StorkKlinik, she returned a few years later to get pregnant again. She is now due to deliver her second child in early 2019. For both pregnancies, she used the same sperm donor, who had registered as open — meaning a child can contact the clinic or sperm bank at the age of 18 and be informed of their biological father’s identity. “I always knew I wanted to have two kids and I thought hopefully I’ll be married,” Ryan says. “But I also said to myself even if I didn’t meet Mrs. Right, I’d just forge on and have another child by myself.”

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    StorkKlinik moved to its current location eight years ago, but it has long occupied an important place in Denmark’s history of fertility treatment. In 1996, the Danish Parliament passed a law making it illegal for doctors to help lesbian and single women get pregnant via ART. Stork, a midwife who had previously undergone IUI and IVF with her partner Inger, had not gotten pregnant before the law went into effect in 1997. But she discovered a loophole: midwives could treat these women, even if doctors couldn’t. In 1999, she set up the Stork fertility clinic. Other midwives as well as people in related medical fields followed suit, opening their own private clinics offering IUI.

    Stork became an active voice in Danish politics, sparking a debate over why lesbian and single women were not considered as suited for motherhood as heterosexual women with male partners. “Because they were so outspoken, they became known in Europe and single women and lesbians started coming to Denmark,” says Stine Willum Adrian, an associate professor at Denmark’s Aalborg University, who has published several papers on the fertility industry.

    The Danish Parliament eventually passed a bill amending the fertility law, making it legal from January 2007 onward for doctors to perform IUI and IVF for lesbian and single women. Since then, StorkKlinik has expanded to employ gynecologists and embryologists to offer a variety of other reproductive technologies, including IVF, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and egg donation. In 2015, it joined the VivaNeo group, a network of fertility clinics that operates in other parts of Denmark, as well as Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands.

    Photo illustration of Cryos, the biggest sperm bank worldwide, taken December 15, 2016, in Aarhus. Henning Bagger—AFP/Getty Images

    It took Ryan six cycles of IUI to get pregnant each time, and she regularly flew from London to Copenhagen, where she fortunately had several friends she could stay with. “But fertility is an expensive hobby,” she says, laughing.

    Although most European countries, including Britain, fully fund or subsidize ART for those who meet certain criteria, the cost can be a significant barrier for those who do not qualify — those who are above the age limit, for instance, or who are single or who already have a child. Some women also prefer private treatment in order to avoid long wait times. An average unsubsidized IVF cycle costs between $2,500 and $5,000 in Europe, about $6,000 in the U.K., and around $12,000 in the United States. But because most patients will have multiple cycles, small cost discrepancies between countries can make a significant difference, leading many British women to take advantage of the cheap flights to Denmark, or other countries in the continent, for treatment.

    Many women in Europe also come to Denmark to avoid the restrictions they face at home: in neighboring Sweden, women cannot access treatment after turning 42 and single women were not covered by government funding until April 2016. (In Denmark, the cost of three cycles of IVF for a first child is covered by the tax-financed public health service for women residing in Denmark up to the age of 40, but all women — including those from abroad — can seek private treatment until they turn 46.) Meanwhile in France and many parts of Germany, doctors can still deny IVF and IUI to single and lesbian women; in Austria and Norway, a lesbian woman in a relationship can be treated but single women can’t be.

    And for those eager to have a child as soon as possible, there’s another reason Denmark is a draw: no waiting time for IUI and other treatments requiring a sperm donor due to the country’s high donation rates — Denmark is home to the one of the world’s largest sperm banks, Cryos International, and exports more than 90% of Danish sperm to other E.U. countries. Unlike the U.S., Denmark is bound by an E.U. directive that forbids the commercial exchange of sperm and egg cells, intended to reduce the risk of trafficking and the transmission of diseases. That means donors can only be compensated for their time and inconvenience; countries can decide what is reasonable compensation for altruistic donation. In Denmark, sperm donors receive roughly $40 to $75 for each donation, and egg donors receive roughly $1,073, up from $368 before 2016.

    Research has found that different factors affect men’s decisions to become sperm donors. Some men donate because they have the option to be anonymous in Denmark (which is not the case in many European countries), while others donate for the opposite reason: because they are allowed to register as an open donor. And while compensation is important for some men, others have indicated they would donate anyway. According to Sebastian Mohr, author of Being a Sperm Donor: Masculinity, Sexuality, and Biosociality in Denmark, sperm donation and other reproductive technologies are socially acceptable in Denmark because most Danes know a child conceived with the help of ART or an adult who has undergone treatment. There is also a widespread idea “that having a child is part of being a good citizen,” says Mohr. “Reproductive technologies have reinforced a belief that every Danish citizen has the right to be a parent.”

    Photo illustration of Cryos, the biggest sperm bank worldwide, taken December 15, 2016, in Aarhus. Henning Bagger—AFP/Getty Images

    In the summer of 2018, Neeley Moore traveled from London to StorkKlinik to be among the first women to make use of a newly amended law in Denmark allowing double donation: where both the egg and sperm cells come from donors.

    Moore’s blood tests in the U.K. had indicated that her levels of the anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), which tracks egg supply, were too low for her to use her own eggs but she decided to try anyway. Moore, a 44-year-old reflexologist, is in a five-year relationship with a man who is 25 years older than her and who already has children from a previous marriage. “We live separately, and this was always going to be my own journey,” she says. She had two rounds of IVF in the U.K., privately, using her own eggs but they didn’t implant. Then she heard about the clinic in Copenhagen.

    Before January 2018, Danish legislation stipulated that a child must be genetically linked to at least one of its parents — either via their mother’s egg or their father’s sperm. This presented a problem for three groups: heterosexual couples who both suffered from fertility issues, single women with poor egg quality, and lesbian couples in which the designated birth mother couldn’t conceive using her own eggs. “Before this year, we couldn’t help single and lesbian women with double donation if they struggled with their own fertility,” says Anita Elverdahl, the egg donation coordinator at StorkKlinik.

    As health workers, including those at StorkKlinik, and patients’ advocates raised concerns about Danish women traveling abroad to Spain and other countries for treatment, the Danish Parliament began to consider easing the ban. In the end, Denmark decided that at least one donor must not be anonymous in double donation. Moore, who got pregnant on her first attempt in Copenhagen and is due to deliver in March 2019, opted to use open donors for both her egg and sperm donors. “It’s not about me, it’s about the child,” she says. “I’ve got enormous gratitude and respect for how this life is being created and I will support the child in their wishes.”

    A map at StorkKlinik VivaNeo shows where women and couples have traveled from to seek treatment in Copenhagen.

    For all its liberalization of fertility laws, Denmark still has certain barriers that affect access to IVF and other procedures. For one, there’s a shortage of egg donors, particularly for ethnic minority groups. Adrian, the associate professor at Aalborg University, says ideas of what is “natural” continue to inform parliamentary debates about egg donation. “People talk about egg cells as a gift, while semen is seen as something that moves around anyway,” she says. “In fact, there’s no real difference between them.” And yet despite the many commercial sperm banks (which are allowed to receive payment even though the donors merely receive compensation for their time and inconvenience), there are no commercial egg banks in Denmark because the sale of eggs in any capacity remains illegal. Commercial surrogacy is also illegal in Denmark —surrogacy is only allowed if a surrogate uses her own eggs and is willing to give the baby up for adoption without payment — so Danes looking for surrogates tend to travel to the U.S. or Mexico.

    Surrogacy is also illegal in Denmark unless the woman uses her own eggs and gives the child up for adoption without payment; Danish law recognizes surrogates as mothers, no matter what genetic relationship they have with the newborn so Danes looking for surrogates tend to travel to the U.S. or Mexico.

    And yet Denmark remains a top destination for those hoping to start a family. In the hallway of StorkKlinik, a map of Europe is dotted with pins showing where patients have come from. Framed photos of smiling babies line the hallways, along with group portraits of the annual Stork Event, a summer gathering of families helped by Stork that has taken place since 2006. Parents can help themselves to red-and-white soft toy storks to give their children; shelves hold books like Hvor er Karlas far? (Where Is Karla’s father?) to help single women explain to their situation to their donor-conceived children.

    “If you’re going down the route of choosing a donor, going to a clinic, putting yourself through all of that, you have to want a child to such a degree that it will carry you through,” says Ryan, who like many of Stork’s clients, came in part because she had a friend who had conceived there; now, nine of her friends have children thanks to StorkKlinik. “It’s ammunition for motherhood. And today, I’m part of this whole spider web of other women who have been through the same thing.”

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    Write to Naina Bajekal at [email protected]

    The maddeningly inscrutable world of IVF costs

    Then, if any of the eggs are fertilized with the provided semen sample, wait another three to five days before your doctor can implant the embryos.

    The American Pregnancy Association says that a single cycle of IVF can cost as much as $17,000, although other organizations cite prices between $10,000 and $15,000. Most figures, however, tend to exclude the cost of hormones and tests that aren’t required but are highly desirable for many would-be parents, such as genetic screenings.

    An exact breakdown of the average cost of each step doesn’t exist, says Barbara Collura, president of the National Infertility Association, also known as Resolve. Compiling such a breakdown would require an immense allocation of both time and money, and Collura isn’t aware of a private medical or academic institution that is undertaking such research.

    There is information available, but it takes some digging to find. The website FertilityIQ, for example, offers patient-written evaluations of fertility clinics, some of which include information about cost.

    “There is no such thing as a typical couple, so going to vary widely,” Collura said. “It’s based on where they live, who they work for and where they’re getting their health insurance from.” Two patients could have dramatically different journeys depending on factors such as age, their general health outside of their reproductive concerns and the number of potentially functional eggs they have. Rarely should a patient expect or budget for just one cycle.

    “Someone at age 40 may require five cycles, and it’s very hard to generalize because it depends on the particular medical condition, particular medical situation, ovarian reserve and age,” says Lusine Aghajanova, a doctor with Stanford University’s reproductive endocrinology and infertility division. Even with two very similar individuals or couples in terms of age or general health, one may end up requiring more clinic visits, more testing, more expensive medications or more cycles.

    In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention counted 284,385 assisted reproductive technology cycles at reporting U.S. clinics, the majority of which were IVF treatments. These cycles resulted in, according to the CDC, 78,052 live-born infants. (An additional 87,535 cycles were done with the intent to freeze the eggs or embryos.)

    The cost of IVF is a topic that those who have undergone treatment say they knew little about before they were confronted with their fertility reality.

    After years of struggling to determine costs for herself, Jennifer Lannon, 27, founded Freeze, an online clinic pricing database and education platform for certain fertility treatments, with her friend, Sidonia Swarm, last year. After learning about egg retrieval and embryo implantation, Lannon spent several years playing phone tag with clinics, trying to pin down procedural cost estimates without having to spend hundreds of dollars on an out-of-pocket consultation expense.

    “A lot of that time was really wasted finding information on clinics in our cities that offer the procedure,” said Lannon. “Specifically, it was really frustrating that none of the clinics posted prices on their website.”

    “You would have to call and play phone tag with these clinics to try to get a full quote on how much it would cost, and a lot of times they didn’t want to give you that information over the phone.” Lannon estimates that her co-founder, Swarm, spent about $800 on consultation charges alone for one clinic where “it was very obvious within the first five minutes that she wasn’t going to freeze her eggs there.”

    Lannon, who lives in Miami, ended up selecting a clinic in New York City because of how few clinics there are where she lives — a dearth of options that Lannon says limits competitive pricing, forcing her to look elsewhere.

    Although Freeze is free for patients (the company pays the bills by inviting medical professionals to sponsor and write reproductive-health-related content), the site has its limitations. Lannon hopes to eventually include the costs for the full in vitro fertilization process, but for now the site lists consultation and egg freezing fees — a step that primarily is taken by younger women who intend to undergo embryo implantation at a later life stage — for approximately 150 clinics in the United States and abroad.

    Cameron says she feels fortunate that at least some portion of treatment will be covered through her insurance. But she still feels slighted.

    “It’s not something that is my fault, it’s not something that I did wrong,” she said. “It’s just a medical condition, just like a lot of other conditions that people have. There’s no reason why it shouldn’t be covered by insurance.”

    Only 16 states require a health insurer to offer individual and group plans that cover some portion of one or more forms of fertility treatment. In the few states that mandate any coverage, the guidelines can be distinctly different. Several states, including New York and Ohio, require insurers to offer health insurance plans that cover little more than diagnostic testing.

    Other states, like Maryland and Rhode Island, cap the amount that an insurer is required to cover at $100,000. Hawaii requires a five-year history of infertility before coverage is required, years longer than most states’ condition of one or two years of continued infertility.

    Collura says that she knows of families who have moved to a more IVF-friendly state in search of better coverage for treatment. Of course, she added, “that’s not always easy to do.”

    Presidential hopeful Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) introduced a Senate bill last year that would require that infertility treatments — including in vitro fertilization — be covered by private health insurance plans. It would also provide coverage to federal employees, active-duty military members and veterans. Booker reintroduced the bill in May with Rep. Rosa L. DeLauro (D-Conn.) and Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.).

    With any luck, the Camerons won’t have to incur any medical debt. After about 150 videos were submitted to the station’s website, the couple found out, live on-air, that they had won the contest.

    “We can’t really put into words what this means to us,’” said Spencer Cameron, Elizabeth’s husband, on-air when they found out that they had won. (A representative of the station responded to a request for comment by saying it was not doing interviews about the contest.)

    “This is truly life-changing, it really is,” he added.

    The combination of the voucher and their insurance has covered everything so far, the couple said. But if they do end up needing to spend more, or need more than just one cycle, it still won’t be the end of their journey.

    “I think in our minds, we would sell our house if we had to,” said Cameron, later adding that they would look at medical loans. “We would sell our house; we would sell our cars. We would do whatever it takes.”

    Bridget Reed Morawski is a freelance writer and reporter based in the District.

    Follow On Parenting on Facebook for more essays, news and updates, and join our new Facebook discussion group about parenting and trying to have a career. You can sign up here for our newsletter.

    More from On Parenting:

    The rise of the only child: How America is coming around to the idea of ‘just one’

    Summer is a logistical and financial puzzle that’s driving parents crazy

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    Cheaper and more affordable IVF treatment

    Searching for cost effective fertility treatments in the Irvine City location can be a complicated process. Some fertility facilities promote affordable IVF on their sites, but they have a denial note about qualifications, and also really few individuals really get the reduced sticker price. Or, the medications are cost an additional cost– making their “affordable IVF” anything however. Before selecting a fertility physician, it is essential to earn sure all of your questions are answered, and you have a clear understanding of all costs as well as the included solutions. At Life IVF Center in California, we provide a variety of sources regarding affordable fertility services, price cut programs, as well as financing choices.

    Recognize Your Desire For a Family Members at Competitive Price:

    Affordable IVF is a cutting edge assisted reproductive modern technology service that has the prospective to alter numerous individuals’ lives. This therapy substantially has as well as reduces expenses success rates equivalent to standard IVF. Conventional IVF therapies are pricey as well as typically need even more than one cycle, which multiplies economic costs significantly. A bulk of these costs consist of lab job, workers, medications, and also physician check out. We are able to bypass a bulk of these costs with Life IVF Facility at California state area.

    Cost of IVF Treatment at Life IVF Center of Irvine, California:

    We determined the expense per effective delivery with IVF for an average population of couples going through artificial insemination fertilization and also for 2 subgroups: couples with a diagnosis of tubal disease and couples in which the lady is over the age of 40 years as well as the guy has a reduced sperm matter. Details on charges each cycle of artificial insemination fertilizing was acquired from 6 facilities throughout the country; shipment prices with this procedure were approximated from the literature.

    Who is Qualified to Receive IVF Treatment at Budget Price?

    • Women who come under the age of 35 years as well as have high quality ovarian reserve, they are eligible.
    • Affordable IVF is additionally appropriate for single women and lesbian couples wishing to start their household.
    • We schedule the right to alter or change the standards for addition as we regard ideal. Please ask for complete terms.

    Discover Infertility Treatment Clinics that Share IVF Cycle

    A shared IVF cycle is where 2 ladies undergo the very first part of the IVF process at the very same time, after that one woman contributes some of her eggs to an additional lady that can’t use her very own eggs in exchange for a decreased rate determined by the fertility center. You might save approximately from 40% to 50% on your IVF expenses. The only negative with this is that you might end up not having any kind of eggs to freeze if your cycle isn’t really successful.

    Discover Infertility Treatment Clinics that share Donor Egg Cycle:

    With a shared donor egg cycle, two or three females share a donor’s eggs, and they all share in the price of the IVF service. If the contributor doesn’t have sufficient eggs for a common cycle, the only adverse to this is.

    Discover a Fertility Clinic that has a Refund Service or Common Risk Program:

    A refund or shared threat program is an early repayment plan where you would obtain a complete or partial refund if a pregnancy (or in some situations, an online birth) does not come out of your IVF therapy. If you don’t get expecting after your cycles, you will certainly get 70-100% of your settlement back.

    Check Insurance Plan in Your State:

    Check carefully if your insurance company covers any type of costs of fertility treatment. Some insurance provider do cover some, otherwise every one of in vitro fertilization treatment. 15 states in fact require insurance provider to have some kind of IVF coverage, normally through the inability to conceive medical diagnosis and therapy. The states are: Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas and West Virginia, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Hawaii.

    Find Infertility Treatment Clinics in Your Nearest Area at Competitive Price:

    1. Low Cost IVF Treatment in California:

    Life IVF Center

    Address: 3500 Barranca Pkwy., Suite 300 Irvine, CA 92606

    Phone: 1-949-788-1133

    1. Affordable IVF in New York.

    Boston IVF – The Albany Center

    Address: 399 Albany Shaker Road Loudonville, NY 12211

    Phone: 518.434.9759

    Other Locations: Syracuse, Schenectady

    Cycle fees for IVF OR Egg Freezing:

    Genesis Fertility & Reproductive Medicine

    Address: Bay Parkway 6010 Bay Parkway 5th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11204

    Phone: 04 879 3032

    Other Locations: Park Slope, Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Hewlett

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York

    Address: 635 Madison Avenue, 10th floor New York, New York 10022

    Phone: (212) 756-5777

    Other Locations: Downtown, Westside, Brooklyn, Westchester, Long Island, Cornwall

    1. Affordable in Vitro Fertilization Cost in Delaware

    Delaware Institute for Reproductive Medicine, P.A.

    Address: 4745 Ogletown-Stanton Rd MAP I Suite 111 Newark, DE 19713

    Phone: (302) 738-4600

    Other Locations: Milford, DE

    1. Low Cost Fertility Clinics in Maryland

    Fertility Center of Maryland

    Address: 110 West Road, Suite 102 Towson, MD 21204

    Phone: 410-296-6400

    Other Locations: Bel Air

    1. IVF Process Cost in North Carolina

    Duke Fertility Center

    Address: 5704 Fayetteville Road Durham, NC 27713

    Phone: +1 919-572-4673

    1. Cheap IVF Near me in Arizona

    Reproductive Health Center

    Address: 4518 E. Camp Lowell Drive Tucson, AZ 85712

    Phone: (520) 733-0083

    1. Fertility IVF Cost in Kansas 2018

    Midwest Reproductive Center, PA

    Address: 20375 W. 151st St., Ste 403 Doctors Building 1 Olathe, KS 66061

    Phone: 913-780-4300

    Other Locations: North Kansas City, MO; Olathe, KS

    1. Low Cost Infertility Treatment in New Hampshire

    Boston IVF

    Address: The Seacoast NH Center 1245 Washington Road Rye, NH 03870

    Phone: 888-300-2483

    1. Average Cost of IVF Treatment in Pennsylvania 2018

    Main Line Fertility

    Address: 825 Old Lancaster Road, Suite 170 Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

    Phone: 610.993.8200

    Other Locations: Paoli, West Chester, Center City Philadelphia

    1. Low Cost Fertility Clinics in Kentucky

    Fertility and Endocrine Associates

    Address: 4123 Dutchmans Lane, Suite 414 Louisville, KY 40207

    Phone: (502) 897-2144

    1. Affordable Fertility in New Jersey

    Morgan Fertility and Reproductive Medicine

    Address: 475 Highway 70 West Suite 201 Lakewood, NJ 08701

    Phone: (732) 363-4777

    Other Locations: Ocean/Eatontown, Old Bridge

    1. Low Cost Fertility Clinics in Texas

    Center of Reproductive Medicine

    Address: 1015 Medical Center Blvd. Ste. 2100 Webster, Texas 77598

    Phone: (713) 535-9519

    Other Locations: Beaumont, Houston

    1. Average Cost of IVF in Florida

    Fertility and IVF of Miami

    Address: Baptist Medical Arts Building 8950 North Kendall Drive Suite 103 Miami FL 33176

    Phone: (305) 596-4013

    Other Locations: Miami Beach, Miramar

    1. Low Cost Fertility Clinics in Virginia

    Dominion Fertility

    Address: Dominion Fertility – Arlington 4040 North Fairfax Drive Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22203

    Phone: (703) 920-3890

    Other Locations: Fairfax, Washington DC, Bethesda

    1. Cost for IVF Treatment in Ohio

    University Hospitals Fertility Center

    Address: 1000 Auburn Drive, Suite 310 Beachwood, OH 44122

    Phone: 216-844-8447

    Other Locations: Cleveland, West Lake

    Low Cost Infertility Treatment Options:

    At Life IVF Center, we are fertility pioneers, offering our clients confirmed brand-new technologies, as well as our company believe that the brand-new low expense treatment is an interesting development that will certainly make fertility treatment a lot more accessible as well as affordable.

    If you are interested in having this new low cost treatment, please visit www.lifeivfcenter.com for more information.

    Searching for affordable fertility treatments in the NYC area can be a daunting process. Some fertility clinics promote low cost IVF on their websites, but they have a disclaimer about qualifications, and very few people actually qualify for the low advertised price. Or, the medications are sold for an additional fee – making their “low cost IVF” anything but. Before choosing a fertility doctor, it’s important to make sure all of your questions are answered, and you have a clear understanding of all costs and the included services. At GENESIS Fertility in New York, we offer a variety of resources about affordable fertility treatments, insurance, discount programs, and financing options.

    Schedule an Appointment

    Treatment Costs for IVF

    A common misconception about fertility care is that it is not covered by insurance, prohibitively expensive and out of the reach of those who cannot afford large out of pocket payments. As a result, couples confronting the need for fertility therapy often anticipate that they will need to expend part or all of their life savings in order to pay for their care. Fortunately, these notions are untrue. Most couples at GENESIS are insured for fertility treatments, including IVF. Learn more about the costs for fertility treatments.

    Affordable Fertility Treatments

    At GENESIS Fertility in New York, we understand that finding affordable fertility treatments, including IVF and IUI, is a huge concern and how that can often paralyze a patient from moving forward with treatment. That is why we offer a variety of financial options to meet the needs of our patients; providing you with the highest quality of care available in a compassionate and cost effective manner. Learn more about affording fertility treatment and your personal chance of succeeding with IVF.

    Payment Options

    A common question is “Will health insurance cover fertility treatments?” We offer resources about health insurance, discount programs for fertility treatments, financing options and money-back refund programs.

    What will insurance cover under New York’s new IVF law?

    In 2020, New York’s laws will change, and some large-group health insurance plans will cover IVF and egg freezing. If you aren’t sure if your insurance will cover fertility treatment, please contact us.

    With multiple fertility centers in the NYC area, GENESIS serves fertility patients from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and Long Island, New York. If you have any questions about your financial options for affording fertility treatment, please contact us at 718-283-8600.

    Low Cost IVF in the United States

    By JustineTaylor Updated on January 14, 2020

    CNY Fertility Center, founded and directed by Dr. Robert J. Kiltz, with offices across New York State, offers low cost fertility/infertility treatment that include IVF, ICSI, PGD, Cryopreservation, Donor Eggs, and much more. Although fertility treatments are offered worldwide, wide variations are noted in different countries in regard to quality and availability. Medical tourism is becoming a popular means for consumers to find state-of-the-art medical care around the globe. We have integrated both Eastern and Western medicine to provide our clients with a holistic approach to their reproductive care. It is our goal at CNY Fertility Center to become the center of choice both across the United States and to our friends abroad.

    Our mission is to provide comprehensive reproductive services in a compassionate, honest and friendly environment at a low cost to our clients. In 2010, Dr. Kiltz has created financial plans to minimize the stress on our clients on their journey to build their family. We offer multiple cycle discounts as well as IVF refund programs. Couples interested in donor eggs will also find that we offer exceptional rates in comparison to many other programs and we as well offer both multiple cycle discounts and refund programs for couples/recipients who are interested in pursuing donor eggs.

    As our centers grow to offer services across the United States and around the world, we will strive to meet your needs. We understand the inconvenience of leaving your home for medical care and we will assist you in any way we can to make your stay in New York as comfortable and as convenient as possible. We will provide you with continuous support throughout your journey. Our staff is here for you and it would be our pleasure and our honor to help you build your family.

    If you are interested in exceptional, quality care, in a warm environment, at a low cost, please visit our website at www.cnyfertility.com. If you have questions regarding any aspect of the services offered at CNY Fertility Center, please do not hesitate to contact us at (518) 690-0700. Our staff is available 24 hours per day, 7 days a week, to answer any of your questions. We look forward to working with you.

    Justine Taylor, RN, BSN
    Nurse Manager and IVF Coordinator

    Agencies Make Infertility Treatment Affordable for Low-Income Women

    “There’s a whole lot of stuff we can do besides IVF that can be a lot of more affordable,” Wheeler said.

    This knowledge can be a relief to low-income families who may go into the process assuming there’s no hope of conceiving without the most advanced technologies.

    Get the Facts About Pregnancy ”

    Finding Emotional Support

    There is a phrase about the frustrations of infertility that’s stuck with Lori Moscato for years.

    “The emotions run out before the money runs out,” she said.

    Financial strain makes for a significant source of stress throughout the process, but the anguish alone is distressing enough.

    As founder of the Pay It Forward Fertility Foundation, Moscato understands how emotionally costly infertility can be. She likens the experience to applying for a job month after month and getting rejected for no reason.

    The goal of Pay It Forward grants, Moscato says, is to offset some of the financial burden and therefore offset some stress, making the overall process a little more manageable. It’s one less thing to worry about during a trying time.

    That emotional well-being can make a true difference in fertility success.

    Nancy Hemenway, executive director of the International Council on Infertility Information Dissemination (INCIID), tried to have a baby for seven years with four miscarriages. She found encouragement and medical advice from other people online, and she eventually was able to carry a baby to term.

    Hemenway’s interactions with others seeking fertility advice online prompted the creation of INCIID, deemed the first infertility site on the web.

    Now she and the experts at INCIID are helping others achieve parenthood with the organization’s scholarship and wealth of resources, many of which focus on mental health.

    The organization recently held a webinar about recognizing the mind-body connection in relation to infertility, a concept that Hemenway believes is often overlooked.

    “It’s surprising how many people don’t think about that,” Hemenway said. “When couples are in the midst of this, it’s so stressful that they don’t take time to breathe, literally.”

    Making Fertility Access Political

    Advocates for access to affordable infertility treatments are bringing the conversation into the public sphere with calls for changes in insurance policy.

    Most insurance plans won’t cover infertility care. If insurance is available for treatment, there may be restrictions on what’s covered. Currently, 15 states have laws mandating coverage for infertility treatment, with different patient requirements for each one.

    But, as Hammond explains, certain loopholes can exempt some employers from providing coverage for fertility-related support. For example, if a business is associated with a national organization, it might be able to bypass the state mandate.

    It’s one issue that the National Infertility Association’s Resolve initiative is tackling, a measure that some fertility experts, including Hammond, support.

    “This is a disease, and it deserves the same support from our medical community and our policy community as other diseases,” she said.

    Read More: Fertility and Age ”

    Making a Plan

    Undergoing fertility treatment as a low-income woman or couple can be intimidating, but the fertility experts agree that with the right plan, care can be affordable and effective. It’s often just a matter of knowing what resources are out there, including grants for fertility treatment.

    “The knowledge gap to me has been most noticeable in underprivileged communities,” Hammond said. “Whether they are communities of color, communities in urban locations or in rural locations, these are communities where people are less likely to know about some of the different options.”

    Without the knowledge of fertility financing options, people could be missing out on easily accessible means of care and support. It’s another issue fertility financing programs are working to address.

    “A large part of what we do is talk about the financial planning so that people don’t just walk away thinking that it’s just not available, it’s not something they can pursue,” Hammond said.

    And there are always options, whether reaching out to a support network, talking to insurance providers about treatment coverage, or applying for grants and scholarships.

    “It’s really important before you get into treatment to plan ahead,” Hemenway said. “What are your long- and short-term goals? How far will you take treatment? It doesn’t mean that you can’t go back and tweak your plan if you can’t do three IVF cycles.”

    Cost

    It is more expensive to be infertile in America than any other developed nation. Today, the costs of an IVF cycle have surpassed $23,000 per patient, dramatically higher than $12,400 figure often quoted to patients by clinics and the industry societies. The reality, according to our data, is that the average IVF patient will cycle multiple times (2.3 – 2.7x), which brings the actual cost closer to $50,000. One article published in JAMA in 2015 estimated successful IVF patients spent on average $60,000 or more across three cycles.

    There are multiple cost components to an IVF cycle and they add up quickly. The basic monitoring and procedures themselves often run around $10,000 – $12,000. The cost of medications typically range from $5,000 – $7,000, though deals can be found by purchasing medication abroad. The decision to do PGS carries a $5,000 price tag, and there is healthy debate when that test is most appropriate. Even procedures like ICSI cost $1,000 – $3,000 and, for the majority of patients, its use probably isn’t necessary.

    Women who elect to do egg freezing deal with the same reality. Their per-cycle treatment will typically cost around $16,000 and, as with IVF patients, they’ll often come back for a second cycle, bringing the real costs closer to $30,000. And that’s not including years of paying storage fees.

    To be certain, the costs are not equal in every part of America. Cities like Chicago and San Francisco are conspicuously more expensive because a single clinic holds 30 – 50% market share and patients have less choice. Conversely, costs are lower in Boston where multiple large hospitals (MGH, Brigham & Womens, etc.) compete with a number of aggressive private practices (Boston IVF, IVF New Engalnd) to offer patients more choice.

    For gay couples pursuing surrogacy, the costs typically fall between $75,000 – $200,000. That’s because the line items include the cost of an egg donor, a surrogate, medical and insurance expenses, plus agency costs, and that of an attorney. Not surprisingly, many gay couples hope to have twins in the process to help complete their family in a single cycle.

    As for lesbian couples, and single mothers, the costs can vary tremendously. While the costs of donor sperm are typically $1,000 – $5,000, the major variable deals in whether one progresses from IUI ($500 – $2,500 per cycle) to IVF ($23,000 per cycle). Many people enter this process thinking it should be reasonably quick and simple, only to discover they are not as fertile as they presumed, making things more complex and more costly.

    According to our FertilityIQ employment report, less than 27% of Americans have their fertility treatment paid for by insurance, so consumers need to educate themselves on the value of different treatment options (is ICSI worth the extra $1,000 – $3,000?) and where money can be reasonably saved (e.g. applying to the New York Demonstration Fund if you are a state resident).

    Today nearly 50% of U.S. clinics offer patients the chance to buy cycles in-bulk for a discount (known as a package) or with a refund feature (known as “shared risk”). We have mixed opinions on these programs but typically believe they are offered to patients who are otherwise good candidates, succeed early in treatment (2/3 of refund patients succeed in the first cycle, see below) and thus these customers dramatically overpay for results they would have gotten anyhow. What’s more, the list of medical exclusions is enormous (medication, PGS, pre-treatment testing) and as a result most patients spend 25 – 50% beyond the quoted “sticker price”.

    That said, patient levels of satisfaction with these programs are high, though we personally believe irrationally so. If you are being offered access to such a program, consider why, the success rates (at which cycle) others like you in the program enjoyed, and the real cash outlay you’re likely to incur.

    Is the Extreme Cost of IVF for Women In America Really Necessary?

    This heartbreaking state of affairs needs to change now, says Paul Magarelli, M.D., an ob-gyn, reproductive endocrinologist, and founder of HQA Fertility Centers. “When someone asks ‘How do I have a baby?’ the answer shouldn’t be ‘How much are you willing to pay?'” he says. “I’m so saddened when I see people crowd-funding their fertility treatments; it shouldn’t need to come to that.” But, he adds, there are ways to make IVF more cost-effective.

    What Goes In to Having IVF

    It all starts with understanding why IVF is so expensive in the U.S. First of all, IVF isn’t just one thing, it’s an umbrella term that covers a variety of different procedures, explains Dr. Magarelli. The most basic form of IVF, and the one most people picture, involves hormonally stimulating a woman’s ovaries to make more eggs available, harvesting those eggs, fertilizing them with sperm in a petri dish, and implanting them in the woman’s uterus. And then you hope the embryo stays in there and develops into a baby. However, a lot has changed since the 1980s and this description leaves out many of the modern advancements in IVF, he says. Now women have choices-to use frozen or fresh embryos, how many embryos to implant, whether or not to test the embryos for chromosomal abnormalities, whether or not to inject the sperm directly into the eggs, how long to wait between harvesting and implantation, whether or not to assist the eggs in “hatching,” and many more options. Each of these comes with an additional cost. But for women who want the best chance of having a baby-and would you be going through all of this if you didn’t?-these really shouldn’t be seen as “extras” but just as best practice, he adds.

    “Basically you’re asking women to choose between cost and efficacy,” he says. “This is a predicament unique to fertility. In no other medical situation would you ask someone to choose a less effective option just to save money. Have you ever heard of a surgeon charging extra to remove the whole appendix and not just the infected part? In medicine, you need to do the best procedure to get the best outcome. Every woman and her potential baby deserve the ‘Rolls-Royce’ of care and she shouldn’t be penalized for making the healthiest choices.”

    Then there’s the issue of medication. Gonadotropins, the hormones used as the foundation of infertility treatments, are ridiculously expensive in the U.S. These medications can tack several thousand dollars onto the price, and most aren’t covered by insurance. “They’re the only drug I know of that keeps increasing in price over time, rather than getting more affordable,” says Dr. Magarelli, adding that even though the hormonal drugs have been around since the 1970s and more efficient manufacturing practices have been developed, they remain expensive.

    Possible Cost-Cutting Solutions

    So, what’s a woman who just wants to have a baby supposed to do? Some go out of the U.S.-cross the border into Canada where the price drops by half. But this so-called “baby tourism” comes with its own risks, such as the woman facing a medical emergency in another country or differing health standards between labs. Other women lobby for legislation requiring insurers to cover infertility treatments (something that 15 states now do, either in full or in part). Lobbying is useful in a “big picture” way, but it isn’t going to do much to help a woman whose clock is ticking and who needs to conceive ASAP.

    But a third option is available. More doctors, like Dr. Magarelli, are revolutionizing the field by offering low-cost IVF. How? Basically, the process is optimized for the best outcome, according to current medical knowledge, and then it’s offered as a package deal to a much larger group of hopeful women. Each woman still gets the attention of a trained fertility doctor, but because all the women are doing the same procedures, the team can manage more patients at once. The volume of customers allows for more efficient treatment and lower costs from drug companies, as the fertility clinics can get lower-cost fertility services and products from companies by buying in bulk. And for those who worry that these one-stop fertility shops may skimp on individual care, Dr. Magarelli says it’s quite the opposite. IVF is all these clinics do, so doctors and staff become very specialized in it, and the facility is equipped to handle everything the procedure brings with it.

    In addition, he says that fertility docs can save patients money by allowing them to get basic tests and procedures done in their local ob-gyn’s office, making it eligible to be covered by insurance and more affordable-a safe and efficient way to get the necessary tests done in the comfort of your home doc’s office.

    And it’s working. At Dr. Magarelli’s clinic in Colorado Springs, for example, patients can get IVF for $5,900 a cycle-less than half of the national average cost and with 15 to 20 percent more successful outcomes (and success meaning babies born through IVF), he reports.

    It’s not a perfect solution. Not all clinics are created equal. And unless you are an M.D. yourself, it can be hard to understand the differences in treatment options and how they affect outcomes. But more and more doctors and companies are realizing the importance of offering affordable fertility treatments.

    Grants are also worth looking into, but many women aren’t even aware they are an option. In a survey conducted by CoFertility, 44 percent of women reported that they didn’t know fertility grants were a thing, but would’ve applied for some had they been privy to their existence. If that’s you, you can use CoFertility’s Find a Grant tool to find out if you’re eligible for financial aid for IVF.

    Bargain hunting for babies, picking out fertility treatments like you would sandwich fixings at Costco, may raise a few eyebrows. But it’s time to change how we think about infertility-because 10 to 12 percent of women will struggle with it. Treatment shouldn’t be reserved for rich TV stars.

    • By Charlotte Hilton Andersen @CharlotteGFE

    IVF clinics providing affordable IVF:
      low-cost IVF, IVF refund, IVF financing

  • Pacific Fertility Center – Los Angeles
    (located in Los Angeles and Glendale, California)
    Provides state-of-the-art treatment for patients suffering from infertility from all over the world. Pioneers of the IVF refund plan. Contact us today for free consultation.

Georgia (GA)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.
  • Emory Reproductive Center – ARC Network Member
    (Atlanta)
    Emory Reproductive Center features internationally known physicians who are leading experts in complex infertility and endocrine problems with excellent IVF success rates.
  • Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group (PREG)
    (located in North Carolina and South Carolina)
    Affordable IVF with a Refund Plan. PREG is dedicated to helping you achieve your dreams of having a baby. Call for more information.
  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (Atlanta-Northside, Alpharetta, Buckhead-Piedmont, Marietta)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.

Hawaii (HI)

  • Fertility Institute of Hawaii – ARC Network Member
    (Honolulu, Kailua, Hilo and Wailuku)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

Illinois (IL)

  • Chicago IVF – ARC Network Member
    (Naperville, Orland Park, St. Charles, Lincolnwood)
    Ensuring every patient’s comfort while achieving optimal success rates is our highest priority. We’re setting the standard for IVF care.

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.
  • Vios Fertility Institute – ARC Network Member
    (Swansea, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Hoffman Estates, Glenview, Chicago/Wicker Park, Chicago/Westloop, Chesterfield)
    The Vios philosophy is to bring the science of medicine and the art of care to each patient in a customized, welcoming and reassuring atmosphere.

Indiana (IN)

  • Chicago IVF – ARC Network Member
    (Valparaiso and Munster)
    Ensuring every patient’s comfort while achieving optimal success rates is our highest priority. We’re setting the standard for IVF care.

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Iowa (IA)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Kansas (KS)

  • Midwest Reproductive Center – ARC Network Member
    (Olathe and North Kansas City)
    Providing a full range of diagnostic testing and treatment of infertility and reproductive endocrine disorders. They’re known for the personalized attention given to every patient.
  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Kentucky (KY)

  • Fertility & Endocrine Associates – ARC Network Member
    (Olathe and North Kansas City)
    (Louisville)
    A private practice that offers full range of reproductive services and offers surgery treatments for complex cases like endometriosis, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and the like.
  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Louisiana (LA)

  • Fertility Institute of New Orleans – ARC Network Member
    (Mandeville, Metairie, Baton Rouge and New Orleans)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

Maryland (MD)

  • Fertility Center of Maryland
    (Towson and Bel Air)
    Affordable treatment packages for IVF, ICSI and donor egg, including a 6-cycle 100% patient refund program. Excellent pregnancy rates since our opening in 1992.
  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (Annapolis, Baltimore, Bel Air, Columbia, Frederick, Glen Burnie, Hagerstown, Rockville, Salisbury, Towson, Waldorf)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.

Michigan (MI)

  • Michigan Reproductive Medicine – ARC Network Member
    (Bloomfield Hills)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.
  • Wayne State University Physician Group – ARC Network Member
    (Southfield)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

Minnesota (MN)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Missouri (MO)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (St. Louis)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.
  • Washington University Infertility and Reproductive Medicine Center – ARC Network Member
    (St. Louis)
    National leaders in infertility medicine – providing treatment for over 30 years with individualized compassionate care for even the most complex patients.

Nebraska (NE)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

New Jersey (NJ)

  • Morgan Fertility and Reproductive Medicine – ARC Network Member
    (Lakewood, Ocean/Eatontown and Old Bridge)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey – ARC Network Member
    (Basking Ridge, Eatontown, Englewood, Morristown, Somerset, West Orange, Allentown, Freetown, Hamilton, Marlton and Springfield)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

New Mexico (NM)

  • Caperton Fertility Institute – ARC Network Member
    (Albuquerque)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • The Fertility Center of New Mexico – ARC Network Member
    (Albuquerque)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

New York (NY)

  • Reproductive Medicine Associates of CT (RMACT)
    (Poughkeepsie)
    Offering a variety of services to help you achieve your family building goals, we’re committed to providing the highest quality care at an affordable price.
  • Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York – ARC Network Member
    (New York City, Downtown, Westside, Brooklyn, Westchester, Long Island and Cornwall)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (New York City)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.
  • The New York Fertility Center – ARC Network Member
    (New York City and Flushing)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

North Carolina (NC)

  • Duke Fertility Center – ARC Network Member
    This practice not only offers state-of-the-art care in all areas of assisted reproduction but also believes in patient education to help them make educated decisions.
  • Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group (PREG)
    (Asheville)
    Affordable IVF with a Refund Plan. PREG is dedicated to helping you achieve your dreams of having a baby. Call for more information.

North Dakota (ND)

  • Sanford Reproductive Medicine Institute – Fargo – ARC Network Member
    (Fargo)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

Ohio (OH)

  • Cleveland Clinic – ARC Network Member
    (Beachwood, Avon, Cleeland, Solon, Strongsville and Twinsburg)|
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.
  • University Hospitals Fertility Center – ARC Network Member
    (Beachwood, Cleveland and Westlake)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

Oklahoma (OK)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Oregon (OR)

  • Center for Fertility and Gynecology (CFG)
    (located in Los Angeles metro)
    IVF low cost programs – available for the first time from a premier IVF center. Significant savings for all age groups through affordable multicycle programs.
  • OHSU Fertility Consultants – ARC Network Member
    (Portland)
    University Fertility Consultants offers comprehensive fertility services. Our team is committed to providing high quality, cost-effective care to individuals and couples wanting to become parents.
  • Pacific Fertility Center – Los Angeles
    (located in Los Angeles and Glendale, California)
    Provides state-of-the-art treatment for patients suffering from infertility from all over the world. Pioneers of the IVF refund plan. Contact us today for free consultation.

Pennsylvania (PA)

  • Center for Fertility and Reproductive Endocrinology – ARC Network Member
    (Pittsburgh, Butler, Hermitage, Johnstown, McMurray, Cranberry Township, Erie, Somerset and Youngstown)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Penn Fertility Care – ARC Network Member
    (Philadelphia and Radnor)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility – ARC Network Member
    (Hershey)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (Chesterbrook, Lancaster, Mechanicsburg/Harrisburg, Philadelphia – Center City, Warrington)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.

Rhode Island (RI)

  • Women & Infants Fertility Center – ARC Network Member
    (Providence and East Greenwich)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

South Carolina (SC)

  • Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group (PREG)
    (Greenville)
    Affordable IVF with a Refund Plan. PREG is dedicated to helping you achieve your dreams of having a baby. Call for more information.

South Dakota (SD)

  • Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine – ARC Network Member
    (Sioux Falls)
    South Dakota’s only Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist and Embryology team providing comprehensive infertility services including: IVF, Artificial Insemination, and ICSI in a personalized supportive environment.

Tennessee (TN)

  • Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group (PREG)
    (located in North Carolina and South Carolina)
    Affordable IVF with a Refund Plan. PREG is dedicated to helping you achieve your dreams of having a baby. Call for more information.
  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

Texas (TX)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.
  • Center of Reproductive Medicine – Texas – ARC Network Member
    (Webster, Beaumont and Houston)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • DFW Fertility Associates – ARC Network Member
    (Dallas and Southlake)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Fertility Center of San Antonio
    (San Antonio)
    Successful office-based IVF program offers package discount plans, refund plans, and financing payment options for treatment, surgery and medications. Si habla Español.
  • Texas Fertility Center – ARC Network Member
    (Austin, Round Rock, San Antonio, North Austin and South Austin)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.

Virginia (VA)

  • Dominion Fertility – ARC Network Member
    (Arlington, Fairfax and Bethesda)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (Arlington, Dulles-Aldie, Fair Oaks, Fairfax, Fredericksburg, Leesburg, Richmond-Henrico Doctors’ Hospital-Forest, Richmond-Stony Point, Woodbridge)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.

Washington D.C.

  • Dominion Fertility – ARC Network Member
    (Washington DC)
    Looking for fertility solutions? We offer discounted treatment packages, fertility medications, and financing… making IVF more affordable and accessible to all patients.
  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (K Street, Sibley Hospital)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.

West Virginia (WV)

  • Shady Grove Fertility
    (located in Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington, DC)
    IVF 100% Refund if you don’t deliver a baby. Approximately 90% of patients have insurance for their initial consultation. Experience you can trust. Financing available.

Wisconsin (WI)

  • The Infertility Center of St. Louis
    (located in St. Louis, Missouri)
    Since infertility treatment is expensive, we also offer IVF with minimal stimulation (mini-IVF), which is a new, dramatically lower-cost option with comparable results. Call 314-576-1400.

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