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How To Grow Out Your Hair Down There

When conversations about hair below the belt come up it, nine times out of 10, it revolves around how to get rid of it. Or, whether guys care if you get rid of it or not. Or, how to avoid completely ruining your bikini line while trying to get rid of it. Rarely, if ever, are there topic forums around maintaining it. The assumption is that women aren’t interested in that kind of information. The long-standing ideal we’ve been force fed is that pubes are a burden meant to be eliminated.

It’s the reason why, before Fur, there weren’t any products specifically dedicated to caring for your hair down there. And Fur only launched two years ago! Sad! In fact, the idea for the company stemmed from a conversation sisters Emily and Laura Schubert had about how to take care of our pubic hair, not unlike the rest of our body. “The more thought about it, the more they both realized that everyone was being pigeonholed into this idea that removing pubic hair was the only choice you have,” co-founder Lillian Tung tells us. “We decided to create this product that was really about caring for your pubic hair—whether you keep it or remove it or anything in between—and making sure we do it in an all-natural, safety-tested, not embarrassing way.”

Conversations surrounding the topic flared up last month after Amber Rose posted a picture of herself and her bush on Instagram. It was taken down because of Instagram’s censoring rules, but it wasn’t necessarily the nudity people were focused on, but rather Rose’s lack of pubescaping. It elicited a shrug from some, but it grossed others out and pissed off a great number—mostly men. But, as Rose explained in an interview with Refinery29, that was the point. In response, she rallied the internet to participate in what she dubbed the Amber Rose Challenge where she encouraged users to post their version of her picture on “behalf of feminism, body positivity and not conforming to society norms of how we should live, what we should wear and where we should shave.” The submissions were, ahem, interesting, but the message behind it was promising and one that deserves legs: Do what you want with the hair on your nether regions.

Given the fact that many women might not know where to start when it comes to growing out their bush, ahead we lay out a mini primer. We’re not here to force the idea on you—it’s your body, and you have the final say in how you choose to groom or not groom your privates. But this is a decent jumping-off point for anyone looking to gradually #BringBackTheBush today, tomorrow, or in the near future.

Reasons To Maybe Do It
Dr. Hadley King, dermatologist at SKINNEY Medspa, tells us that pubic hair actually serves an important purpose: “It provides a cushion against friction during intercourse that can cause abrasion and injury, and it offers some protection from bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens.” She adds: “Some people also believe that pubic hair helps to trap and spread pheromones, increasing your sexual attractiveness.”

The Beginning Stages
This will be the most uncomfortable and the itchiest part of the growing out process. It’s also the part when your chance of coming face-to-face with ingrown hairs is most likely. Ingrowns can be managed by gently exfoliating while your hair grows out and using an ingrown relief serum (like this one) to be on the safe side. “Once the hair gets past the early growth stage,” Dr. King says, “the problem should decrease.” If the ingrown hairs get to a point where they’re uncomfortable or if you develop what she calls “pus bumps,” then you may have a bacterial folliculitis—an infection of the hair follicles—and should see a dermatologist for treatment. As for the itching, Dr. King recommends picking up this anti-itch lotion.

Another adjustment you can make to make this time easier is switching to cotton underwear, which will allow the area to breathe and minimize irritation.

Caring For It
Once you’re past that awkward stage, though, things should ease up. Nandi Wagner, lead aesthetician at Bliss in SoHo, says the one thing you should be doing diligently is moisturizing the area. As Tung from Fur tells us: “When you take care of , it’s not just the hair that you’re taking care of, it’s not just the skin, it’s a combination of both, which is different than any other part of your body. If you put in a leave-in hair conditioner, you’re really only focusing on your hair, if you’re putting a face lotion on, it’s only the skin of your face. With the pubic region, it’s really important to take into account both the skin and hair, and those two territories have different needs.” And, yes, Fur’s oil addresses both of them. Outside of conditioning the area, though, no special care is required beyond washing daily.

Maintaining It
If wild and free is the look for you, go forth. Otherwise, if you want to landscape a bit, you can use a personal trimmer to keep things in shape the way you like. “If you decide to trim, do so in good lighting and with a mirror,” Wagner recommends. She adds: “It also helps to use a small comb and scissors as a buffer to protect your skin from any accidental nicks.”

Is It Safe to Shave Pubic Hair?

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Can I shave my pubic hair? Is it safe? How do most girls maintain their pubic hair?
– Amanda*

Shaving is one way to remove pubic hair — if it’s done right and you’re very careful. Shaving is fairly inexpensive, and you can do it yourself. Go slowly, pulling skin taut before running the razor over the hair. Always shave in the same direction that the hair grows, not against it. Change razors often to avoid nicks, which happen when the blade gets dull. Using shaving cream also may help protect sensitive skin, like the skin around the bikini area. If you’re nervous about cutting yourself, you can try an electric razor instead.

There are some downsides to shaving. First, there are obvious risks. Using a sharp razor on such a sensitive part of the body means it’s easy to slip up and hurt yourself. Then there’s the regrowth stage: Shaved hair grows back after a couple of days, and when it does it can be prickly or itchy. This can leave a girl feeling uncomfortable.

There’s also a chance some hairs will become ingrown, causing pimples that can be painful. Sometimes people can even get skin infections as a result of shaving. For these reasons, some girls choose to wax or use depilatories on bikini hair. These methods have their downsides too, of course.

Every girl is different when it comes to maintaining pubic hair. Like clothing or hairstyle, it’s a matter of individual preference. Some girls don’t do anything with their pubic hair, leaving it to grow naturally. Some girls only remove hair when they’ll be wearing a bathing suit. And some remove hair regularly as part of their beauty routine.

No health benefits are associated with removing pubic hair, so choose what feels right for you.

*Names have been changed to protect user privacy.

Reviewed by: Julia Brown Lancaster, MSN, WHNP-BC Date reviewed: January 2015

During puberty often one of the first signs of development is marked by growth of body hair, which occurs in both males and females. Specifically, pubic hair will begin to grow around the base of the penis in males and on the mons in females.6 Although this hair is perfectly natural as some people get older they may find that they wish to remove their pubic hair. For women, there have been cultural significance around vaginal grooming,with nicknames given to the different grooming styles, such as a “landing strip” or a “full bush.” In more recent years, men have also popularized their own pubic hair grooming in a practice called “manscaping.” Choosing to modify pubic hair is a completely personal choice, but if one does choose to undergo hair removal there are many methods. These methods vary in how permanent and costly they are.

Cultural View on Pubic Hair

Since the beginning of the 20th century, societal norms have caused a significant shift in the views toward pubic hair and pubic hair modification. In the early 1900s people rarely altered their pubic hair. This changed as the Women’s Movement began in the 1960s and as media sources like Playboy Magazine emerged. As revealing bathing suits and underwear were made popular women felt increasing pressure to have their pubic hair groomed or completely removed. Pubic hair has since become a topic of concern for many women, men, and even adolescents. The increasing popularity of oral sex has also sparked an increase of pubic hair grooming.

In general, attitudes toward pubic hair are similar to those regarding underarm hair: cultural and personal norms are reflected by reactions that range from disgust to admiration. Some people feel their pubic hair makes them feel more masculine or feminine, while others may view their pubic hair with contempt. Slang words for pubic hair include: pubes, bush, curlies, and carpet.

What is the Purpose of Pubic Hair?

The appearance and texture of pubic hair differs among all people. For some people pubic hair is thick and coarse, while for other individuals it may be sparse and/or very fine. The color of pubic hair also tends to vary. Pubic hair and armpit hair can even differ from the hair of the scalp. For most individuals the pubic hair is darker, but in some cases this is not true. For most women, the pubic hair patch is somewhat triangular with the top zone lying over the mons and extending down towards the anus; for most men, the pubic patch tapers upward to a line of hair pointing up towards the navel (commonly referred to as the “happy trail”).

There is no definite answer as to why human beings have pubic hair, but theories do exist. The prevailing hypothesis relates to pheromones which are the odors that the body produces which may be sexually stimulating to others.1 The hair that grows in both the genital area and under the armpits wicks away erotic scents that are then evaporated into the air and smelled by others. Another theory is that pubic hair prevents foreign particles from entering the vagina and prevents chafing, but because this explanation does not address male pubic hair, a third theory suggests that pubic hair serves to absorb odors of the genital region.

Modification of Pubic Hair

Trimming or removing pubic hair has become quite common in many cultures and there are many different types of removal. Removing the hair above the skin is referred to as depilation, whereas removing the entire hair follicle (including the root) is called epilation.

Reasons for why some people modify or remove their pubic hair include the following:

• Hygiene (especially during menstruation)

• Aesthetics (looks)

• Tradition

• Religious beliefs

• Sexual practices (i.e., oral sex, penile/vaginal sex, etc.)

• Comfort Preferences

Removal/Modification Methods

There are a wide variety of methods used to remove or alter pubic hair. The most common short-term method for reducing or removing pubic hair is shaving, while the most common long-term methods include waxing or laser-hair removal. Below are descriptions of the various methods for pubic hair modification.

1. Shaving

A razor (straight razor, safety razor, or electric razor) is used to cut the hair at the level of the skin or relatively close to it. Contrary to popular belief, shaving with a razor does not make hair grow back faster, thicker, or darker. Shaving with a razor creates a flat end to the hair, giving it more sharp edges than naturally pointed hair. Prior to shaving, it may be necessary to shave down lengthy hairs with an electric razor before using a regular razor. After doing this, it is recommended to first wet the area to be shaved and then apply shaving cream or hair conditioner. This acts as a barrier and a lubricant which can help prevent nicks (cuts), bumps, blisters, ingrown hairs, and general irritation. Shave in the direction of the hair growth (with the grain) to avoid ingrown hairs and irritation. Shaving “against the grain” of hair can cause issues such as nicks, bumps, blisters, and more. In order to get the closest and most hygienic shave, it is important to always use a fresh razor or razor head and to never use a razor that is rusted. Using a rusty or old razor can cause a staph infection because bacteria that remains on the razor can be transferred into a small cut.? It is also best to rinse off any leftover hair and shaving cream after use and store it in dry place to prevent bacteria or fungal growth.

2. Bikini Waxing

Waxing is a procedure that involves pulling out sections of hair using various types of waxes. To perform a bikini wax, a licensed esthetician or cosmetologist applies warm wax to a female’s bikini line (inner thigh area), places cloth strips atop the wax, and then removes them by pulling the material off the skin. Oftentimes a small patch of hair is left above the vagina which is usually in the shape of a triangle. This method can be very painful, so pain-reducing gel is often recommended before applying the wax. It is possible that some skin irritation, bleeding, and inflammation of the hair follicles can occur as a result of removing the wax, so do not be alarmed if this occurs. Wax should not be put on skin that is chapped or sunburned or on the face of a person using facial products like Retin-A or Differin (these weaken the skin and could result in skin tearing when the wax is pulled off). If a licensed esthetician or cosmetologist performs the waxing bikini waxes typically cost between $25 and $50. It is important to find a salon that is clean in order to prevent the possibility of getting an infection or even an STI. A new pot of wax should be used with each new client and an applicator should only be dipped into the wax once and spread once over the skin. Although this should be done instinctively, it is a good idea to request safe practices such as these from your esthetician or cosmetologist at the beginning of the appointment.?

Do-it-yourself waxing products are an option which can be purchased and used in the comfort of your own home. Hair needs to be at least 1/8 inch long for waxing to be effective, so do not shave in the days or weeks leading up to your appointment. Results typically last 3-8 weeks.²

3. Brazilian Waxing

The “Brazilian wax” is similar to a bikini wax, but it involves complete removal of hair from the vulva (the external female genitals), perineum, anus, buttocks, and mons. This type of procedure typically uses a wax mixture made from natural beeswax, tall oil, and sometimes botanicals. This wax mixture is stronger and more effective at removing the thicker pubic hairs compared to the synthetic waxes frequently used for leg waxing. While the Brazilian wax has long been associated with women, there are a growing number of men getting the male equivalent of the Brazilian wax. The procedure is performed by licensed cosmetologists or estheticians at numerous spas and salons.³

The Origin of Brazilian Waxing

Though genital waxing has grown in popularity over the past 20 years the practice is not new. Waxing of the genital areas has been prevalent for centuries in Ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, Arabia, Turkey and Persia. In the past, however, the waxes were sugar-based and made with lemon. The Brazilian wax specifically started on the beaches of Rio de Janeiro where many young women wear gossamer bikinis called fila dental (named after dental floss). The Brazilian wax was introduced to the United States in 1987 when seven Brazilian sisters, Jocely, Jonie, Joyce, Janea, Jussara, Juracy, and Julia Padilha, opened a hair removal salon called J. Sisters International Salon in Manhattan, New York.³

Typical Brazilian Waxing Procedure

  • Females may or may not be provided with a paper G-string. The client will then be asked to disrobe from the waist down and lie down on a waxing table.

  • Talcum powder is sometimes spread over the area to be waxed because it prevents the hot wax from sticking to the skin.

  • Hot wax is applied with a thin wooden stick and given a short amount of time to harden. The wax strip is then pulled off in the opposite direction of hair growth (against the grain) with a cloth strip.

  • This process is repeated until the hair on the vulva, mons, and/or perineum, and anus is removed depending on the client’s preference. The application and removal of the wax is done in sections as the cosmetologist works around the client’s body.

  • Once the waxing is complete, tweezers are used to remove any remaining stray hairs that were not removed during the waxing.

  • In some cases there will be a strip of pubic hair left on the mons veneris (often called a “landing strip”) which is trimmed or waxed depending on the client’s request. If the remaining hair is trimmed, it may be dyed or shaped into various patterns. If the remaining hair is removed, the procedure is called a full Brazilian wax or Hollywood wax.

Dyeing Pubic Hair

Men and women who want to take the risk of dyeing their pubic hair should avoid dyeing the hair covering the genitals and only dye the hair that covers the pubic bone (the mons). The dye can cause irritation if applied to the labia—both inner and outer lips of the vulva. For males, it is important to avoid the penile shaft and the scrotum because these zones tend to be sensitive. Many people experience irritation or allergic reactions, including burning of the vaginal area, itching, blisters, redness, or complete loss of hair. It is important to test for sensitivity first by doing a skin patch test 48 hours before attempting to tint hair.

The Results

The results of a Brazilian bikini wax typically last from three to six weeks, depending on the individual’s hair regrowth rate. Regrowth of pubic hair is generally minimal during the first two weeks and increases by the third. Heat stimulates hair growth, so regrowth may be quicker in the summer months. With regular waxing, hair regrowth will generally slow down, and the time between waxing sessions will increase.

Pain

It is normal to feel pain during a Brazilian or bikini wax; however, the severity of pain varies greatly among women. The most painful area to get waxed is usually the mons veneris (the area above the clitoris), whereas the least painful area is behind the genitals and around the anus. The best time to have your pubic hair waxed is a week after menstruation, because the genital area is least sensitive during this time. In contrast, the pain is likely to be greatest immediately before and during menstruation when the area is most tender. Typically, the first Brazilian wax is the most painful. The pain should gradually decrease in subsequent waxing sessions when the hair is thinner and easier to pull out.

4. Tweezing

Tweezing is a laborious method that involves plucking each individual pubic hair. There may be pain, skin irritation, and inflammation of the hair follicle as a result of tweezing. Hairs often grow back as “ingrown” hairs meaning that the hairs continue to grow underneath the surface of the skin, can create long spirals, and can often lead to infections. Tweezers cost anywhere from $3 to $20. Results last about three weeks.

5. Laser Hair Removal and Intense Pulsed Light

Laser hair removal is FDA approved. Working with small areas of the skin, the laser beam destroys hair follicles and impairs hair regrowth. Redness or pigmentation changes of the skin may result after treatment. Laser treatment works best on people with light skin and dark hair, but the procedure may not be effective on deeply-embedded hair follicles. Consequently, this treatment is not usually very effective on blonde, grey, red, or white hair as it requires a concentration of melanin at the root of the hair. This procedure works by targeting the root of the hair, so it is recommended that you avoid plucking, waxing, and electrolysis beginning six weeks prior to the procedure so that the root is left intact. Only a doctor or licensed technician should perform laser hair removal. This procedure is more expensive with most patients needing between 6 to 10 treatments every 4 to 8 weeks for lasting results.? The average cost for one session of laser hair removal is between $200 and $300, but costs may vary depending on the size of the treated area and number of treatments. This procedure can be used for pubic hair removal, and it can be done to accommodate both bikini and brazilian (full removal) preferences. Results are long lasting, but some hair may grow back. If hair does grow back it is typically more sparse and much finer than pre-treated hair.?

Methods Not Recommended for Pubic Hair Removal

While there are a wide variety of hair removal methods on the market, it is important to note that not all methods are appropriate for pubic hair removal. Often, these methods are too strong to be used on such a sensitive area.

1. Epilators

Mechanical epilators are devices that pull out the entire hair follicle. These should not be used on sensitive skin areas such as face, genitals, or armpits because the soft skin of the bikini area may tear. In addition, the hair must be about a quarter inch or longer to work, and the epilator could still miss some hair. Mechanical epilators cost anywhere from $50 to $100. Results last about one week.

2. Electrolysis

Electrolysis is a very laborious method of hair removal, because each hair must be treated individually. During electrolysis, a qualified professional inserts a needle under the skin which passes an electric current through the hair follicle to damage it. Because this process is so time-consuming, and requires multiple treatments, it can be very expensive. Electrolysis can also be painful, and there is a risk of scarring and infection. This procedure should only be performed on the eyebrows, face, thighs, abdomen, breasts, and legs. Results are long lasting, but some hair may grow back.?

3. Hair Removal Creams and Lotions

Hair removal creams and lotions, also referred to as depilatories, contain chemicals that dissolve the protein structure of hair and cause it to separate from the skin. Some depilatories can increase acne and cause skin irritation or chemical burns if the formula is too strong or if the cream is left on for too long. These creams and lotions are not intended for use on the labia minora (the inner lips) or any region close to the bikini line. Depilatories are sold over-the-counter at most drug stores and cost $5- $10. Results last about one week.

Concluding Remarks

Although there are many different methods of hair removal, deciding of whether or not to remove pubic hair is totally optional. Media and advertisements may try to push that a certain look is now “in style” but just like different body types aren’t fads neither are grooming choices! These decisions—to groom, trim, shave, wax, pluck—are all valid and are all personal decisions to make.

Last Updated: 7 February 2019.

As if it needs to be said, the full bush is back. But the au naturel look is far more than a fad or trend resurrected from the ’70s. For many women in 2019, body hair has inherent social implications that run the gamut from more newfound self-love to fighting the patriarchy.

While Lillian Tung and Laura Schubert, cofounders of the pubic hair and skin company Fur, firmly believe that how much or little hair a women chooses to keep down there—or anywhere else—is a personal decision, they do agree that online platforms such as Instagram are furthering the conversation around letting it grow out. “With the rise of social media as a ‘filterless’ platform, women are becoming more comfortable discussing body hair,” they explain. And Bea Feliu-Espada, founder of feminine-care brand The Honey Pot, also sees a correlation with shifting beauty ideals. “I think the strong movement towards body acceptance and positivity that has been swelling up for the past few years includes embracing your pubic hair in its natural state,” says Feliu-Espada.

It’s a pivotal shift that New York City–based holistic ob-gyn Dr. Eden Fromberg, who has observed fuller hair down below in her patients over the past few years, believes is a long time coming. “Women are becoming increasingly aware that our bodies are a lot more than the visual or sexual playthings that past cultural norms implied,” she says. “We want to express our diversity and power, live our preferences, and feel comfortable in our own bodies without judgement.” And just as important to Fromberg as shattering stereotypes is getting the point across that pubic hair isn’t dirty or unhygienic. “Pubic hair exists to protect our delicate areas and encourages a diverse and often quite healthy microbiome, which keeps us in balance while preventing infection,” she continues.

And while foregoing regular waxing or shaving for the first time in a long time can be liberating, it can also be uncharted territory for many women. From minimal grooming to gentle cleansing, here the experts weigh in on how to maintain the natural look.

Invest in Trimmer Scissors
While a buzzer for your bikini line can be handy, Fromberg recommends cutting pubic hair with small trimming scissors (“Not a scissor that you use to cut paper or things in the kitchen!” she cautions), as well as sterilizing the blades beforehand with alcohol. For better results, use a magnifying mirror, and if the hair is long enough, a fine-tooth comb can help hold it in place as you trim. If you prefer to shave simply to neaten the area, do so with a natural shaving cream, like Dr. Bronner’s Organic Shaving Soap, and be sure to disinfect the blade with a toner infused with witch hazel afterwards.

Exfoliate to Treat and Prevent Ingrown Hairs
Ingrown hairs can be par for the course no matter how you wear your pubic hair. “When it comes to keeping ingrowns at bay, exfoliation in the shower works wonders,” say Tung and Schubert. Fur’s Ingrown Concentrate is infused with moisturizing coconut oil and antibacterial tea tree oil to help banish bumps; it comes with an exfoliating finger mitt to help lift dead skin and trapped oil in special spots. For extra care outside of the shower, you can also massage the area with Cap Beauty’s Bikini Dry Brush to boost circulation and speed up any needed healing.

I tried Emma Watson’s favorite pubic hair oil, and it was amazing

Image zoom shophealthhut/Instagram

At the risk of giving spoilers at the top of this piece, Emma Watson is a genius.

Last week, Into The Gloss interviewed Emma Watson about her beauty routine. It’s worth reading in its entirety, but one thing stood out:

“I use Fur Oil. I’ll use that anywhere from the ends of my hair to my eyebrows to my pubic hair. It’s an amazing all-purpose product.”

From the way Watson said it, I thought it was hair oil she used on her pubic hair.

When I visited the Fur Oil website, I discovered that it’s an oil specifically designed for pubic hair that Watson is also using on her brows and hair. Yes, please!

It’s also $40 (still a yes, but less please).

I have fair-skin and dark hair, and sensitive skin, so I’ve battled ingrown hairs since puberty. Shaving is not an option for me, unless I’m looking for a week of excruciating pain and some unsightly bumps. I waxed, exclusively, for ten years — until that caused too many ingrown hairs, too. Now, I’m getting laser on my bikini line, though I’m overdue for my next appointment by about fourteen months… you know, because money.

I like to think of my snatch situation as Seventies Lite — I’m embracing the pubic hair that comes with adulthood, but it is groomed and under control, which is why I’m all about anything that will soften, and I regularly use a conditioner.

All of that to say, I am in the market for a pubic hair oil. So when Emma Watson revealed that she swears by Fur Oil, I was intrigued. I stopped by Merz Apothecary, the only place in Chicago that stocks Fur Oil, only to find that I’d been late to the draw.

There had been an Emma-Watson-fueled gold rush on the stuff and they were fresh out, but thanks to an ANGEL OF SKINCARE, I didn’t leave empty handed.

Image zoom Fur Oil / www.furyou.com

They gave me a healthy amount of samples, and I grabbed bottles of the Ingrown Concentrate ($28) and Stubble Cream ($34) because I never do anything half-way, and I have a little bit of a spending problem.

In the name of a true experiment, I decided to test out the pube oil in a whole night of self-care.

Watson takes a bath every day of her life, so I took an epic bath. I would have loved to try the Lola’s Apothecary Queen of the Roses Bath Milk that Watson mentioned— it was inspired by Cleopatra’s milk baths— but at £70, it was too pricey for me. (Somehow, I still managed to spend $200 at Lush. Whoops. Again, spending problem…and maybe that explains why I’m too broke for my next laser hair removal treatment).

The first thing I did was apply the oil to my brows. Wow. I didn’t know that my brows were coarse, but compared to how they felt fifteen minutes after I applied the Fur Oil, apparently they were. It made my brows so soft that it will be difficult not to ask people to touch them.

I also ran the oil through the ends of my locks. Again, I was impressed. I have fine hair, so most oils leave my looking greasy, even after I shampoo. This oil left my hair light while also hiding that I am overdue for a haircut, which I am.

Image zoom Fur Oil / www.furyou.com

From there, I applied the stubble cream, all over my this-would-be-blurred-on-cable-television area. The products smell amazing. They’re minty and fresh, the type of smell that makes you worry — is this gonna sting my bits? Worry not! It feels like heaven on the skin.

After using Fur Oil on my nether regions, my pubic hair is noticeably softer.

For real, I have never experienced anything like it, and I condition on the reg. If a product can make coarse hair un-coarse, this is it. Plus, it made the surrounding skin nice and supple.

Unfortunately, I can’t report on Fur Oil’s effects on ingrown hairs after using it once, but I am dedicated to finding out. If you’re interested in the results of my highly scientific experiment, I will be recording my findings each day for fourteen days on Twitter. (Follow me at @MKnotfunny) 😉

  • By Mary Kate Miller

Whether you wax, shave or let it grow, it’s important to care for your pubic hair and the delicate skin in the pubic area.

Shaving and waxing can irritate the skin area leading to ingrown hairs, dryness and even rashing! All of which are uncomfortable and your underwear can irritate this further. We spoke to the team at FUR to get their top tips to maintain this area.

10 tips to care for your pubic hair (and skin):

Exfoliate:

Keep your pores clear by gently exfoliating any dead skin around the pubic area with a dry brush or a rough washcloth — Fur’s Ingrown Concentrate comes with an exfoliating mitt perfect for exfoliating smaller areas.

Condition and soothe:

For a deep condition, try taking a hot bath and putting a few droppers’ worth of Fur Oil in it. A soak in the hydrating tea tree and jojoba oils will soothe your skin and soften your hair and skin all over your body.

Need extra conditioner?

If you have extra time to pamper yourself, try an all-natural deep conditioner on your pubic hair for silky results.

Choose your underwear wisely:

Keep your mesh or silk lingerie for special occasions, and leave them at home when you hit the gym – a more breathable fabric like organic cotton helps prevent irritation.

Trim with clean tools:

If you trim at home, make sure you clean your tools regularly to prevent bacteria build-up.

Soften before shaving:

When trimming or shaving, always make sure you soften the skin first with hot water and shaving cream. Never try shaving dry skin.

Prevent infection:

If you happen to nick yourself shaving or waxing, be careful to make sure the spot stays clean and bacteria free; that area is more prone to infection.

Careful when waxing or lasering:

If you choose to groom your pubic hair via waxing or lasering, make sure your skin isn’t left raw. Don’t go over the same area more than twice when waxing, and always follow a hydrating regimen afterwards to protect the delicate skin.

Ditch the fragrance:

If you choose to groom your pubic hair via waxing or lasering, don’t use fragranced moisturisers. These are full of chemicals that can irritate the already sensitive skin. For a good moisturiser without the harsh chemicals, try Stubble Cream.

Keep it personal:

How you choose to groom is a personal choice. Make the right choice based on the type of skin and hair you have, and not on whatever style is “trending.” What’s right for someone else’s pubes may not be right for you!

And there you have it! A few tips to keep your pubic area soft and irritation free. Thanks to FUR to giving us the low-down. Have any of these tips got you thinking? Drop us a comment below or tweet us @totmorganic. For similar reading, catch up on our brave or shave blog where we discuss grooming standards and society attitudes towards pubic hair.

I’m about to get real here: The bush is back.

Among friends and around the web, I hear that more and more women are tossing their razors and canceling their waxing appointments in favor of the more au naturel option. “Prior to recently, it was assumed that there was one standard way to care for your hair down there—which was to get rid of it,” says Lillian Tung, co-founder of Fur, a brand that makes a pubic hair oil. “It’s now more open and considered as admirable to grow it out as it is to trim it. There’s not just one right choice—it’s what you feel.”

Of course, you can still care for your nether-regions even if you skip on trimming your pubic hair. Just as your self-care practices extend from your scalp down to your toes, so too, should they apply to the area in-between. “Your beauty routine should definitely include the pubic area, too,” says Tung. “The pubic hair and skin area is an under-explored beauty frontier, and it actually has specific needs. The hair and skin are in very close proximity to each other, and you can’t just use any regular skin-care or hair-care focused product.” So, just how should you address this? Let’s get to it.

Curious about how to groom a bush or grow it out healthily? Keep scrolling for Tung’s best tips for maintenance.

Photo: Stocksy/Vera Lair

Avoid fragrance

Just like with your skin-care products, the products you use on your bikini area shouldn’t have fragrance (which is an umbrella term that could contain any number of irritating ingredients). “Your skin is very sensitive down there,” says Tung. “A lot of products are about deodorizing the area, and can have strong acids, alcohols, or added fragrances. These ingredients can cause irritation.”

Keep the pH balanced

Another way to handle the sensitivity in the pubic area is to find products that balance its pH. “We love tea tree oil because it’s antimicrobial, clears pores, and regulates your sebum production,” says Tung. And that means that it can help when you get ingrown hairs that become inflamed or filled with pus. “It’ll give you softer skin with no redness or bumps.”

Trim it the right way

If you’re looking to rock a totally natural bush, don’t worry about trimming it. But if you want it more contained, Tung recommends special scissors. “Use scissors manually for more detailed work. Make sure you have dedicated bikini area scissors, and be sure to wipe them down after each use,” she says.

Wear cotton

One might wonder if a bush requires a certain underwear type. “In the summertime if you’re worried about irritation, ingrowns, or chafing, it’s important to keep your underwear dry and breathable,” says Tung. “Stick with cotton.”

Originally published August 22, 2018; updated September 5, 2018.

These are more tips for ouch-free bikini line maintenance. And this is the case against shaving your bikini area.

Is it necessary to cut pubic hair?

Answer – No, it is not necessary to cut pubic hair. Shaving pubic hair is a personal choice but does not have any health benefits as such. Pubic hair offer protection to your genitalia from infection and any friction. It is more hygienic not to remove pubic hair as women will end up getting cuts or ingrown hairs and will also develop hyperpigmentation and inflammation of the hair follicles. Removing pubic hair can also elevate the risk of catching herpes and other sexually transmitted diseases. This is because the sensitive pubis is left with small cuts through which viruses and bacteria can penetrate.

Can I use a hair removal cream on my pubic area?

Yes, you can use a hair removal cream around your bikini line, but ensure that you do not use the cream in your areas. Hair removal creams offer easy application and sometimes serve as an effective remedy. A hair removal cream breaks down the chemical bonds of the hair and in no time, the hair becomes very weak and can be easily scraped off. The creams make your hair dissolved and crumbled.

What will happen if you pluck your pubic hair?

Plucking or epilation removes the hair from its roots beneath the surface of the skin. Plucking your pubic hair is a very painful and timely process. Plucking can cause redness, swelling, itching, irritation, and damage to the skin. It can also result in ingrown hairs (where hair curls in a backward direction or grows sideways beneath the skin and creates a small lesion) and infection.

Is it normal to have a lot of hair down there?

Yes, it is normal to have a lot of hair down there. In women, having hair on the vulva is completely normal and healthy and in men, having hair on and around the scrotum is normal. Both men and women have pubic hair around their genitals which starts growing during puberty. In women, pubic hair serves as vagina’s eyelashes that prevent unwanted dirt of bacteria from entering into the body.

How do I make my pubic hair smooth?

Pubic hair can be made smooth by conditioning. There are several moisturizers, oils, shampoos and hair conditioners available in the market for conditioning and softening of pubic hair. A home mixture of shaved cucumber, coconut oil and lychee are also helpful in softening the pubic hair. Argon oil, Fur oil are also helpful. Last but not least is to drink a lot of water and keeping yourself hydrated.

Is it better to shave or wax?

While waxing is considered to be better than shaving, it is important to keep in mind your skin, hair growth, and hair texture. If your skin is very sensitive, then waxing can be a very painful experience. Waxing could cause rashes and even aggravate it. Shaving, on the other hand, is quick and pain-free. It is also cheaper than waxing. Another advantage of shaving is that you can do it yourself. It can be said, that it is a matter of personal choice. For some, waxing is the best and for some shaving is the best.

Is armpit hair and pubic hair the same?

No, the armpit hair and pubic hair are not the same. Armpit hair also known as axillary hair is the hair in the axilla area (underarm area) and Pubic hair is the terminal, darker and thicker body hair that grows in the genital region of adolescent and adult humans. Pubic hair can be seen on and around the sex organs. It is found on the scrotum in men and on the vulva in women.

Should you wash your pubic hair with shampoo?

No, there is no need to wash your pubic hair with shampoo. Using shampoos, soaps or perfumes disrupts the pH of the pubic area and throw it off causing irritation and other problems. Washing pubic hair with hot water is enough to keep the area clean. In case you must use a shampoo or a soap, look for pH balanced pubic washes to clean your pubic hair.

How do I prevent razor bumps on my private area?

In order to prevent razor bumps on the private areas:

  • Invest in a good bikini razor.
  • Clean your bikini area with warm water.
  • Lightly exfoliate with a wet washcloth or a scrub to get rid of dead skin cells.
  • Use a good-quality shaving cream or gel with some natural moisturizing ingredients, such as olive oil, shea butter, and coconut oil. These bases offer a proper buffer for the razor and help in avoiding razor bumps.
  • Shaving in different directions with the razor allows ingrown hairs and cuts. You should shave in only downward direction—with the hair growth.
  • Change the blades very often. More the blades, the fewer times you will fee; the need to re-shave this sensitive area.

How long does shaving last?

Answer – Shaving pubic hair lasts just a few days at the most for most of the females before that stubble begins to grow back. Shaving is safer than waxing as there is no upliftment of hair. It lasts only a few days because it does not remove the hair from the root. It just cuts hair that are close to the skin’s surface.

I am an overwhelmingly high-maintenance person. I know that’s extremely uncool to admit, but it’s true and I’ve come to terms it. My clothing is organized by sleeve length, I exclusively feed my cats their favorite wet food, and the volume on TV always has to end in 0, 2, 5, or 8. (Okay, that last one is more neurotic than anything.) This is even truer when it comes to beauty. Not only is my nighttime skin routine intensive AF, each of my showers involves three cleansers to coordinate fragrance with different body parts, and my massive nail polish collection is color-coded (I have an entire row of topcoats). However, these behaviors are all somewhat expected of a person employed at a beauty magazine. It is actually my pubic hair-care regimen that takes people by surprise.

Pubic hair has found itself at the center of many a debate regarding body standards and societal expectations rooted in sexism, leading to all beauty-related practices related to it often being labeled either shallow and misogyny-driven. My philosophy, however, is that as long as a grooming ritual is done for your own personal comfort and enjoyment, and provided you’re not hurting yourself, then it shouldn’t be dismissed. And I was so inspired by our recent dreamy pubic hair portrait series that I decided to share my not-so-secret secrets — to hell with anyone’s opinions on my (admittedly eccentric) routine.

Let me rewind. I used to shave all of my pubic hair because I, like many people, operated under the assumption that I had to in order to be “hygienic” — a fallacy rooted in body-shaming and propagated among middle and high schools across America. It remained stuck in my brain all the way through college until I first openly discussed the matter with a friend who didn’t remove her hair at all.

“Aren’t you sick of the bumps?” she asked. Indeed I was, but I was equally tired of the time and effort and expectations involved. It so often felt as though my sex life hinged on whether I had shaved that morning. This notion was often totally inaccurate, but a certain level of internalized misogyny (and all the fun anxieties it spawned) prevented me from realizing so for quite a while.

By the time I was 22 or 23, I had become considerably more comfortable with my own pubic hair, allowing it to grow. The bumps went away, for the most part, and I went back and forth in my presentation, removing varying amounts throughout the next couple of years. Eventually, I found a happy medium that I liked both aesthetically and logistically: I remove hair from the very outside, i.e. past the line where my leg meets my torso, and keep the rest. This has stayed relatively consistent since (though, by age 25, I often stopped taking any off the outside whatsoever).

Fast-forward to 2015: while working as a beauty editor at a different publication, I received a package from Fur containing a couple of bottles filled with translucent yellow oil. “For Pubic Hair,” read the press release. Now, I had tried quite a few hair oils at that point but none for non-head hair, so I was a bit apprehensive. In addition to the company’s signature Fur Oil, there was also a tube of its Stubble Cream and a small bottle of the brand’s Ingrown Concentrate.

Long story short: I tried them, I loved them, and the rest is history. Well, not really — I literally used them this AM and it’s fresh in my memory, so I’m actually going to explain how and why I utilize each product, as well as how the rest of my current regimen works.

Daily

After finishing my facial routine (double cleansing, micellar water if I wore eye makeup, toner, serum, eye cream, and moisturizer), I put a couple of Fur Oil drops on my hands and apply it to my pubic hair. It acts similarly to regular conditioner in that it keeps the hair softer and more moisturized, so it just looks and feels…better.

How to get more pubes?

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