How Does Voodoo Floss Work?

At this point, many of you have probably seen voodoo floss being used in your gym or had it performed by a manual therapy practitioner. Voodoo Floss is a manual therapy technique that is extremely effective in treating joint pain as well as improving joint and muscle movement. While we know voodoo floss to be a great therapy tool, the physiological process of how it works is less understood. To we’ll cover a few of the more popular theories

1. Compression Distraction

Compressing a joint with the elastic band creates a distraction force that creates extra room in the joint capsule itself. Mobilizing a joint with the a voodoo band compression allows us to go through that particular joints full range of motion (with no restrictions).

2. Improving Muscle Gliding Services

This is where the idea of ‘flossing’ comes in. Much like we floss our teeth to remove any gunk that may have accumulated, compressing muscle groups and taking them through their range of motion creates a ‘flossing like’ effect between individual muscles, breaking up adhesions in fascia that may exist and allowing for better range of motion and movement.

3. Ischemic Compression

Compressing a joint or muscle group with the voodoo floss band improves local blood flow and circulation by temporarily restricting blood flow to the area. When the band is taken off a fresh supply of blood rushes into the area to aid in healing and recovery.

Interested in learning more about voodoo floss or learning how to safely and effectively perform on yourself? Check out our YouTube page for step-by-step tutorials.

Invictus Blog

The Wonderful World of Voodoo Floss
Written by Michele Vieux

Ever wonder why so many athletes are hooked on their Voodoo floss? Are you trying to decide if you should get some? Not sure how to use yours? Hopefully you already know all of the wonderful uses for Voodoo floss and it’s amazing benefits for your mobility and recovery but just in case you do not, here’s a summary of why this tool is so magical along with some examples and ideas for making the most of your floss.

Out With the Old & In With the New

Voodoo Floss helps break up intramuscular junk to allow for greater mobility and blood supply to an area. By squeezing the muscle in a tight wrap, then forcing it through a full range of motion (ROM), friction between muscle fibers helps break up fuzz, scar tissue, lactic acid and other junk in those tiny places that foam rolling and lacrosse ball techniques can’t address. You will only leave the Voodoo floss on for about two minutes.

Example: TIGHTLY wrap the calf and do calf-focused self-myofascial release (SMR), stretching, squats, lunges, etc.

Healing & Cleansing Power

When you release the band, a rush of blood washes through the muscle; this not only brings nutrients for growth and healing but also clearing out all that junk you just broke up. This is also true for injury recovery and can be used to aid the healing of strained tissue. For swollen areas, you want to promote lymphatic drainage. To do this, wrap the band about half as tight as you do when you’re trying to mobilize the area. It’s good to put the area through gentle ROM if you can; shoot for more of a compression massage where you are physically maneuvering the area versus bashing it to death.

Example: For swollen knees, wrap the band snugly but not too tightly around the knee and then massage the swollen area. A few gentle squats here would be ok or even walking up and down stairs. No prying or other aggressive movements.

Stretch Those Hard to Stretch Places

To work shoulders, wrists, ankles, elbows and the little pieces within, wrap a band tightly around the joint (sometimes it might take two bands to cover the area) and put it through ROM like push-ups, PVC pass-throughs, squatting, lunging, etc. For knees, wrap one band above and one band below the joint, then do some squats. When you put the joint through ROM with bands anchored on either side, they stretch everything in between, which can greatly improve not only joint ROM but also pain, stiffness and tendonitis.

Example: Wrap your elbow tightly starting four fingers above the joint and rollling down tightly. Force your elbow into flexion by doing push-ups or having someone bend it.

Good to Go versus Probably a No No

Unfortunately, as great as this tool can be, there are some areas of the body that floss does NOT help. Please avoid these areas.

Good to Go: shoulders, arms, elbows, wrists, hands, thighs/hamstrings, calf, ankle, foot

No No: head, face, neck, chest, torso, abdomen, back, over knee cap (this one is your call but I don’t think it feels very nice)

Extremely Important – Please Note!

ROLL FROM THE TOP DOWN and leave the loose end near the bottom to avoid a “code red”. A code red happens when the loose end is left at the top of the wrap and then the top rolls down over the end, tightening and tangling it into something that’s impossible to unravel and you have to cut yourself out of.

Where & What to Purchase

You can purchase Voodoo Floss on Amazon.com or RogueFitness.com and I recommend that you purchase the 28’ length and cut it into three pieces – 2 x 10’ & 1 x 8’ – versus purchasing the pre-cut 7’ lengths. You can never have too much floss but you hate to run out halfway down a quad.

Test and retest the ROM and/or do one side and compare it to the other the first few times you Voodoo so you can see what a difference it makes. After that, when you’re a pro, you can wrap more than one body part at a time and come up with your own movements and motions with them on depending on your needs and what feels like it works best for you.

Please share your favorite use of Voodoo Floss in the comments.

Joint and Muscle Flossing

Have you heard of this relatively new treatment technique commonly called “flossing”?

The rise in popularity of floss bands (or compression band therapy, CBT) can be largely due to interest from the Cross Fit world where it is a popular mobility tool for athletes pre competition and training. The idea and frequency of use in a clinical physiotherapy setting post injury or surgery is limited with a lack of good clinical trials currently available. Potentially, common injuries such as sprained ankles, torn muscles and post-operative surgery stiffness can benefit from such techniques.

The proposed benefits include:

  • increasing joint range of motion (ROM)
  • improved muscle mobility
  • decreasing pain levels
  • potentially speed up recovery through effect on myofascial release, occlusion and reactive hyperemia

The practical use is generally limited to the joints and muslces of the periphery (the legs and arms for ease of application) though other areas have been “flossed”. Stiff joints and/or tight muscles can be the target. Once shown this technique, floss bands can be self-administered as part of a warm up for training and competition to help tissue mobility. The process involves:

  1. Firmly overlap wrap the floss tape (2.5-7.5cm wide latex rubber band) around the limb (muscle or joint) from proximal to distal (although direction has not been scrutinized)
  2. Keep on for 2-4 minutes for treatment
  3. The joint or muscle is moved through active or passive ROM (such as a squat/lunge/calf raise) (Figure 1)

An video example for floss application for a knee can be seen here

note: Neurovascular precautions should be observed during application to avoid numbness, pins and needles or excessive changes to blood flow

Looking for a new mobility and recovery tool? Wondering why you see people wrapping themselves up pre-workout? PhysioRX’s Georgio Baylouny, PT, DPT, OCS, explains how, when and where to use VooDoo Floss.

Learn more about Georgio and EVF Recovery here. Questions? Comment below!

What is muscle or joint flossing?

Popularized by Kelly Starrett and Mobility WOD, “flossing” is a method of wrapping a muscle group or joint tightly, while stretching or performing certain exercises with the goal of improving mobility or decreasing pain.

Floss wrap comes in two sizes — 2 and 4 inches wide. The smaller size is good for the arms and lower legs, while the bigger width is probably required to wrap your thigh.

Popular brands include Rogue, Mobility WOD, and RockTape’s RockFloss. Any brand will do.

What’s it actually doing?

Well, improving mobility of course! But here’s the interesting thing — the medical community isn’t exactly sure how this stuff works. We do know, however, that any sort of mobility tool is creating short term perceptions in increased mobility through manipulating the nervous system.

There are some theories as to what the floss is doing, and these include shearing and gliding of the layers of skin and muscle fascia, communicating with the nervous system to bring awareness to a certain area, and improving joint gliding.

Some things that Voodoo floss definitely isn’t doing: breaking up scar tissue or re-releasing nutrients to the area. Some well-known CrossFitters and big brands may make these claims, but these simply just aren’t true. Don’t get me wrong, flossing works; we just aren’t entirely sure how.

With that being said, Voodoo Floss without a doubt can be a very useful tool in your warmup and recovery routines.

Flossing for mobility

VooDoo floss can be a great tool to make short-term improvements in joint mobility and/or muscle flexibility — perfect for your pre-workout warmup.

The correct way to use floss for mobility:

  1. Choose a limitation in mobility (for weightlifting or CrossFit, it’s usually ankle dorsiflexion, hip rotation, or shoulder rotation).
  2. Get to class a few minutes early and try one of the techniques in the videos below.
  3. See if it makes a difference for you! This is just another tool in the toolbox, so be sure to see if it’s helpful specifically for you.

When your joint is wrapped (always at 50 percent tension and 50 percent overlap), move into the restricted range of motion about 20 times or 60 seconds. No need to add 10 minutes on to your warmup or floss your entire body. Move it and move on!

Flossing for soreness

Use floss for that post-workout muscle soreness. A little compression can really feel great on your muscles on a recovery day or immediately post-workout.

The correct way to use floss here: Wrap the sore muscle or joint with 50 percent tension and 50 percent overlap and keep it on only for 1 to 2 minutes. You don’t want to wrap too tight or keep it on for too long as these bands can cut off circulation. You can mix it in to your recovery routine. Wrap for a 1 or 2 minutes, stretch or move around a bit, then floss again.

But people use the Normatec Boots for up to 20 minutes. Why wrap for just 1 minute here? Again, this is very different than other recovery tools. The Normatecs cover the entire leg and provide sequential, intermittent compression. Voodoo bands are narrower, can get very tight, and provide constant pressure, meaning 1 to 2 minutes is plenty. Don’t let your limb get numb or tingly.

Remember, there’s a difference between a little post-workout soreness and persistent pain. If the soreness is consistently decreasing your performance or even preventing you from working out, a little floss wrapping won’t fix the underlying problem. Get assessed by your coach or a rehab professional.

Is this the same as BFR (Blood Flow Restriction Training)?

No!

Not only is this band NOT actually occluding the arteries or veins even close to desired stimulus for hypertrophy, but this is potentially very unsafe. Creating such a tight, narrow tourniquet can damage the nerves and blood vessels in the area. Don’t be that guy! Stick to an FDA approved BFR cuff and learn to right way to do it … for both safety reasons and maximal hypertrophy gains.

How to Use Floss

Hamstring soreness and hip internal rotation

Ankle mobility and calf soreness

Anke mobility/range of motion

Shoulder internal rotation

Georgio Baylouny, PT, DPT, OCS

Physical Therapist New York, NY

What is Muscle or Joint Flossing?

Popularized by Kelly Starrett and Mobility WOD, “Flossing” is a method of wrapping a muscle group or joint tightly while stretching or performing certain exercises with the goal of improving mobility or decreasing pain.

Floss wrap comes in two sizes – a 2″ width and a 4″ width. The smaller size is good for the arms and lower legs, while the bigger width is probably required to wrap your thigh.

Popular brands include Rogue, Mobility WOD, and RockTape’s RockFloss. Any brand will do the trick.

What is VooDoo Floss Doing?

Well, improving mobility of course! But here’s the interesting thing – the medical community isn’t exactly sure how or why this stuff works. We do know however that any sort of mobility tool is creating short term perceptions in increased mobility through manipulating the nervous system.

There are some theories as to what the floss is doing, and these include shearing and gliding of the layers of the skin and muscle fascia, communicating with the nervous system to bring awareness to a certain area, and improving joint gliding.

Some things that voodoo floss definitely isn’t doing are breaking up scar tissue or re-releasing nutrients to the area. Some well known Crossfitters or big brands may make these claims, but these simply just aren’t true. Don’t get me wrong, flossing can work, we just aren’t entirely sure how.

With that being said, voodoo floss can be a very useful tool in your warmup and recovery routines.

Is Floss Wrap the Same As BFR (Blood Flow Restriction Training)?

No!

Not only is this band NOT actually occluding the arteries or veins even close to the desired stimulus for hypertrophy, but this is also potentially unsafe. Creating such a tight, narrow tourniquet can damage nerves and blood vessels in the area. Don’t be that guy! Stick to an FDA approved BFR cuff and learn the right way to do it. For both maximal safety and maximal muscle gains.

VooDoo Floss for Mobility

Voodoo floss can be a great tool to make short-term improvements in joint mobility and/or muscle flexibility – perfect for your pre-workout warmup.

The correct way to use floss for mobility:

  1. Choose a limitation in mobility (for weightlifting or Crossfit, its usually ankle dorsiflexion, hip rotation, or shoulder rotation)
  2. Get to the gym a few minutes early and try one of the techniques in the videos below
  3. See if it makes a difference for you! This is just another tool in the toolbox, so be sure to see if it’s helpful specifically for you.

When your joint is wrapped, (always at 50% tension and 50% overlap), move into the restricted range of motion about 20 times, or 60 seconds. No need to add 10 minutes on the warmup or floss your entire body…move it and move on!

VooDoo Floss for Muscle Soreness

Use floss for that post-workout muscle soreness. A little compression can really feel great on your muscles on a recovery day or immediately post-workout.

The correct way to use floss here – wrap the sore muscle or joint with 50% tension and 50% overlap and keep it on for only 1-2 minutes. You don’t want to wrap too tight or keep it on for too long as these bands can cut off circulation. You can mix it in to your recovery routine. Wrap for a minute or two, stretch or move around a bit, then floss again.

But people use the Normatec Boots for up to 20 minutes…why wrap for just 1 minute here? Again, this is very different than other recovery tools. The Normatecs cover the entire leg and provide sequential, intermittent compression. Voodoo bands are narrower, can get very tight, and provide constant pressure. 1-2 minutes is plenty. Don’t let your limb get numb or tingly.

**There’s a difference between a little post-workout soreness and persistent pain. If the soreness is consistent causing a decrease in your performance or even preventing you from working out – a little floss wrap isn’t going to fix the problem. Get assessed by a rehab professional.

VooDoo Floss for Shoulder Mobility

VooDoo Floss for Ankle Mobility

VooDoo Floss for Hip Mobility

VooDoo Floss for Calf Soreness and Ankle Mobility

Ready to Get Started? Click HERE or a complimentary consultation with a Doctor of PT. Jump on a phone call or visit us in person to make sure we can help you!

Floss Everyday

Here is another amazing post from our Head Coach Mischa Jemionek about the use of Voodoo floss originally posted on CrossFit Love’s blog December 31, 2013. A lot of people know the benefits of Voodoo Bands but not sure how and when to use them

How and When to Use a Voodoo Band

Most athletes know that foam rollers and lacrosse balls are excellent tools for soft tissue mobilization. But what about the VooDoo floss band? Or if you are a CrossFit Love member, we have the various lengths of donated bike tires that have been cut in half length-wise and live in the bucket of lacrosse balls. Those work just as well. I see people wrapping them around all sorts of injuries and ailments without knowing how to use them properly. It can be the one of the most effective mobility tools in your bag when used correctly, so I want to share the basics to proper usage.

Background (Sciencey Stuff)

Do you remember the acronym R.I.C.E. from your First Aid class? Rest-Ice-Compression-Elevation. Most people remember the ice piece of that. When you sprain your ankle playing basketball, ICE. When your wrist is sore from practicing handstand push-ups, ICE. When you strain your quad doing sprints, ICE. When you miss the box during box jumps and cut your shin open, ICE. There has been more and more research coming out that ice may not be as effective for treating injuries (other than for pain control by making the area numb) as we once thought. Even when it comes to muscular soreness and stiffness after a tough workout, compression seems to be the most effective way to combat the effects.

So how does it work? From your experience with foam rolling and lacrosse balls, you know that compression causes trigger points to release. Incorporating motion with those techniques increases the effectiveness by restoring the sliding surfaces of the muscle fibers and surrounding tissues. Using a stretch band when mobilizing increases range of motion because it creates a joint distraction force allowing for more joint spacing during the movement, therefore allowing more movement. You also know that massaging or compressing a swollen or inflamed area decreases the swelling by pushing the inflammation back into circulation via the lymphatic system. VooDoo floss accomplishes all of these goals and then some, in about two minutes. Think of it as a circumferential foam roller that adds compression and joint distraction, and allows you to go through a FUNCTIONAL movement pattern. Because after all, isn’t our goal to be more functional?

When to Use (Goals)

  • Decrease soreness and loss of motion after exercise: One of my go-to uses for VooDoo floss is to save my forearms after “Helen” or calves after a long run. Flossing after a high volume of work on one body part pushes the inflammation caused by exercise back into circulation, and prevents the “my forearms are about to explode” feeling the following day.
  • Break up adhesions and scar tissue: VooDoo floss is extremely effective at breaking up adhesions that build up from years of poor movement; think tendonitis (Achilles, patellar, golfers elbow). Flossing creates a “shearing” force across the tissue, essentially helping it to re-align and restore normal motion and increase blood flow.
  • Decrease swelling: Compression of a swollen area pushes the inflammation back into the lymphatic system to be reabsorbed by the body. Swelling is a common cause for loss of range of motion or “tightness” after an injury.
  • Increase range of motion in and stretch hard to reach areas around joints: One of the biggest advantages to using VooDoo bands is the ability to go through a FUNCTIONAL range of motion. Bending and straightening your knee while foam rolling your IT band helps, but is not as functional as squatting or lunging in a good position.

How to use (Instructions)

  • When using the VooDoo band for decreasing swelling, wrap joint towards the heart.
  • Overlap band by half.
  • Apply band with about 50% tension and 75% tension over the targeted area.
  • Incorporate motion gradually and make sure that you are in a good position, ie. Squatting with a vertical shin, knees out, and feet flat, or doing a dip with a vertical forearm and rotating around the elbow. Mobilizing in a bad position only reinforces bad habits; always mobilize into the position you are trying to achieve.
  • Don’t force the movement. “Floss” the joint through a good movement pattern and try to increase range of motion with each repetition.
  • Make the movement functional. Do a push up or pull up, squat, lunge, or overhead press, but make sure it is correct and through a full range of motion.
  • To increase range of motion of a joint, try wrapping one band above the joint and one below. Then go through a movement pattern, squat, do a push up, lunge, or dip; whatever your goat.
  • Remove the band after about two minutes and allow the tissue to recover and re-vascularize.

How Not to Use (Contradictions)

  • Remove band after about two minutes; OR
  • Remove band if you feel numbness, tingling, or “pins and needles”.
  • Remove band if extremity turns white or grayish.
  • Using a VooDoo band isn’t exactly the most comfortable thing, but make sure you remove the band if you feel any PAIN.
  • Do NOT use on the face, head, neck, or around your waist/chest. I feel like this should go without saying, but I have seen people try some strange things.

My FAVORITE uses (Try these out if you haven’t already)

  • Decreasing swelling and inflammation. Like I mentioned before, the first thing I run for after finishing “Fran” or “Helen” is my floss band to prevent my forearms from exploding. Try wrapping your forearms and putting your wrists through a range of motion by pressing against a wall. Turn your elbows up and down with your palms against the wall. This technique also works on the lower leg and calf after double-unders, box jumps, or running; quadriceps after tabata air squats; or triceps after a push-up workout.
  • Breaking up adhesions at the elbow and knee. Wrapping over the patellar tendon, IT band, or wrist extensor/flexor complex works wonders for tendonitis at those joints. Try wrapping either joint and doing a PERFECT squat, lunge, push up, press, or dip.
  • Increasing shoulder range of motion. Try wrapping the VooDoo band around the deltoid and shoulder complex and reinforcing good shoulder and scapular positioning on the floor, put the shoulder through a full internal and external rotation motion.
  • Opening up the hip girdle. Try wrapping the VooDoo band around your hip crease. Do a few squats, side to side lunges, or even the pigeon or adductor stretch.
  • Stretching the Achilles in those hard to reach spots. Try wrapping half of the band around your foot and the other half around your lower calf. Then do a few toe raises and downward dogs stretches pushing your heels to the floor.
  • Using with a half-lacrosse ball to relieve trigger points in large muscle groups. Try wrapping a half-lacrosse ball with an x-pattern to apply direct pressure to spasms in lower legs, quadriceps and hamstrings, biceps/triceps and forearms. It is like being able to move around and through a position of restriction with a foam roller attached.

—-A word of warning when trying to cut a lacrosse ball in half: A saw of any sort is NOT a good idea. I halved mine after a lawnmower got ahold of one. I just finished the job with some scissors.—-

Again, these are a just a few of the uses for this tool. Please feel free to share any others you have had success with. And a friendly reminder, don’t just mobilize the painful tissue or joint. Look ABOVE and BELOW the site of pain for the problem or restriction!

Photos

  1. Forearm – wall
  2. Knee – squat
  3. Hip – side lunge
  4. Achilles – above/below
  5. 1/2 lax ball – Quad/hamstring
  6. Elbow – dip/pushup
  7. Elbow – dip/pushup
  8. Shoulder – IR/ER

Mischa Jemionek, MA, ATC, CSCS, CES, CrossFit Level 1

Assistant Athletic Trainer

Princeton University

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Voodoo Band Flossing – A Magic Bullet?

Maybe you’ve seen fellow athletes using voodoo bands in the gym, but not sure what this magic tool does or how it works. With the rise in popularity of voodoo band flossing, I wanted to take some time to dig a little deeper and offer some guidance on how it all works.

There are many potential benefits of using compression tack and flossing (voodoo flossing) as a performance enhancing or rehabilitation tool. With the high movement and mobility demands typically seen in CrossFit, the Voodoo Band can be an excellent tool to support your training. Some of the potential benefits include:

  • Improving range of motion and joint mobility in a position of restriction
  • Reducing swelling and inflammation in a joint
  • Reducing pain (can be particularly helpful for tennis elbow pain)
  • Improving muscle contraction
  • Restoring sliding surfaces
  • Releasing trigger points

Another great benefit, you can use the voodoo band to create mobility while in the position you are trying to alter. This allows you to use the voodoo band to create positive change to movement and mobility, while moving into your areas of restriction.

How does the voodoo band work?

Use of compression and movement (or flossing) can work on many different levels. It incorporates all the mobility systems simultaneously, having the potential to effect multiple surrounding structures including muscles, tendons, joint capsules and nerves. This makes it challenging to know exactly how flossing is impacting the treated area.

Looking at flossing’s impact on mobility, Dr. Kelly Starrett uses a great explanation in his book Becoming a Supple Leopard. He compares the joint capsule and connecting musculature to a rubber band. Imagining a rubber band with a thick end (the joint capsule) and a thin end (muscles), your typical stretching and mobility work would create change in the area of least resistance, the muscles. Use of tools like the voodoo band can create a gapping or compression force around the wrapped area, helping create change within the thicker end of the rubber band, the joint capsule. Considering the joint capsule can often be a source of movement restriction, tools like the voodoo band can be essential to getting the most out of your mobility training.

How do I use the voodoo band?

When using the voodoo band, you generally wrap towards the heart. The goal is to create a large compression force around the restricted joint or tissue. To achieve this, start wrapping the band about 5cm below the area you are wanting to treat, aiming to finish wrapping about the same distance above the treatment location. For mobility, a stretch of around 75 percent can be applied to the band at the area you are treating, with 50 percent stretch around the remaining area. During wrapping, aim to keep a few centimetres overlap (half the width of the band). If you have any leftover band, additional compression can be applied by making an “X” over the treatment area.
Once the band is applied you can try moving into the position causing restriction, or moving the joint or limb in all possible directions. There are a few guidelines for knowing how long to keep the voodoo band on, however a general rule is to aim for around 2-3 minutes. If you feel any of the following during use, it would be advisable to remove the band:

  • If your skin turns ghostly white, or when you touch the skin and the colour doesn’t return
  • You begin to feel numbness or pins-and-needles
  • You suddenly feel claustrophobic

It is normal to feel a little uncomfortable, especially during your first use. Following application, the skin can become quite red as blood flow returns to the treated area. You may even notice some leopard stripes (red marks) on your skin due to pinching from the band. If you feel unsure about the voodoo band flossing, or have any pre-existing conditions, you might want to talk to your healthcare provider before use.

What does the evidence say about voodoo band flossing?

To date, scientific research regarding voodoo band flossing is limited. Although there is a large amount of anecdotal support, there are very few studies investigating the effectiveness of flossing. Of the studies that do exist, many use small test groups, or are only looking at the impact of flossing on people without existing restrictions or injuries. In addition, understanding exactly what changes are happening to tissues and structures during flossing is lacking.

From the existing research, flossing appears to have the most impact on ankle mobility and performance. In particular, short-term increases in ankle dorsiflexion mobility (the mobility needed when squatting), improvement in single-leg jump performance and reduced ankle pain were noted following flossing. Studies investigating the effect of flossing on the shoulder and elbow joints are yet to show significant improvements in mobility or power, however increases in elbow mobility were noted in tennis players that had an existing mobility restriction.

Conclusions

At this stage it’s difficult to draw any conclusions about the effectiveness of flossing, as reliable research is lacking. From my experience, the voodoo band is an excellent tool, especially for short-term treatment of pain or mobility restrictions around the elbow, ankle and knee.
If you haven’t experienced the effects of voodoo band flossing, I would highly recommend trying it out in your next warm-up or mobility session to feel the magic for yourself!

Starrett, K., & Cordoza, G. (2015). Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance. Victory Belt Publishing.

Ross, S., & Kandassamy, G. (2017). The Effects of ‘Tack and Floss’ Active Joint Mobilisation on Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion using Voodoo Floss Bands. Journal of Physical Therapy.

Borda, J., & Selhorst, M. (2017). The use of compression tack and flossing along with lacrosse ball massage to treat chronic Achilles tendinopathy in an adolescent athlete: a case report. Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, 25(1), 57-61.

Hodeaux, K. (2017). The Effect of Floss Bands on Elbow Range of Motion in Tennis Players (Doctoral dissertation, University of Arkansas).

How to voodoo floss?

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