Training & nutrition

Countdown to the big race, October 11, 2020

Training program

The official Bank of America Chicago Marathon Training Program from Nike is designed to get the best version of you across the finish line. The 18-week program will help you develop speed, endurance and strength to get you ready to tackle your first or fastest marathon.

The 2020 Bank of America Chicago Marathon Training Program will be available in the coming months.

Do you want to learn more about the official Bank of America Chicago Marathon Training Program in partnership with Nike Run Club? Sign up here.

By signing up, Nike will send you an email with more information about how to join the official Bank of America Chicago Marathon Nike Run Club Training Program. This program will be delivered through the Nike Run Club App.

In addition to the training program, Nike will be reaching out to you with inspiration, motivation and expert tips to get you to race day.

Health & nutrition

Remaining healthy throughout your training for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the key to crossing the finish line on race day. Tips from Marathon sponsors Gatorade Endurance, Athletico and Mariano’s will help you to finish strong and get the most out of your Marathon experience.

Train with what’s on course. Gatorade Endurance is proud to be an official partner of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, hydrating athletes on race day.

View tips from Gatorade.

Your secret weapon for pre, during and post-race. Learn why runners turn to Biofreeze, the #1 clinically recommended topical pain reliever, to help overcome aches to achieve their personal bests.

View tips from Biofreeze.

Remain healthy throughout your training. Check out some tips from supporting sponsor, Athletico Physical Therapy on how to remain healthy as you train. At Athletico, we help runners keep running.

View tips from Athletico.

Pre-race nutrition from Mariano’s
The Importance of Staying Hydrated. Hydration is important before, during, and after the marathon. Learn strategies that will help you succeed in the Chicago Marathon from Mariano’s Registered Dietitian Peggy Balboa below. And for weekly nutritional advice and recipes to aid your training, visit marianos.com/runners. View tips from Mariano’s.

Choosing the Right Training Plan for the Chicago Marathon

Have a question about running? You’re in the right place. Every Tuesday, world-renowned coach, author and athlete Hal Higdon posts and answers athlete questions here. You can submit your question by joining the discussions on Hal Higdon’s Virtual Training Bulletin Boards.

QUESTION

I just want to give you a huge thanks for helping me qualify for Boston by almost 15 minutes yesterday. I could not have done it without your training plans. Training for Chicago begins June 9th. I’m looking to ramp up my training a little bit this summer to improve on my PR. Is Advanced 2 more difficult than Advanced 1, despite it being less miles?

HAL’S ANSWER

Congratulations on your fine performance, but in designing programs for runners at different levels, I don’t count miles. Particularly in the Advanced Realm, quality counts more than quantity. Advanced 2 is more difficult than Advanced 1, because it features an extra day of speedwork. If you feel you need more miles, you can always add them yourself, but be cautious. It’s great to ramp up your training, but you don’t want to go backwards rather than forward by overtraining.

Finally, while you are selecting a specific program for The Bank of America Chicago Marathon, be aware that I do offer Novice, Intermediate and Advanced programs specific to that marathon. These are the programs utilized by the CARA Marathon Training Class in Chicago. The training instructions are the same, but the interactive versions feature tips related to that race. You can access my Chicago Marathon training programs by going to the TrainingPeaks menu of Hal Higdon programs.

Jordan Hasay is best known for being a Runner. She was born in Fontana on September 21, 1991. Jordan is turning 29 this year. American middle-distance runner who was unanimously selected as the 2008 Girls High School Athlete of the Year.

Jordan Melissa Hasay is an American distance runner. She grew up in Arroyo Grande, California, where she attended Mission College Preparatory High School. She was unanimously selected 2008 Girls High School Athlete of the Year by the voting panel at Track and Field News. In March 2009, she became the ninth high school athlete and third woman on the cover of Track and Field News magazine. She attended the University of Oregon, where she studied business administration and competed on the cross country and track and field teams earning 18 All-American honors, 2011 Mile and 3,000 meters NCAA titles. Her father was a high school basketball star in Pennsylvania, and her mother was a national level swimmer in her native England.

Continue below to see how tall Jordan Hasay really is, plus her weight, body measurements and stats.

Facts

Real Name: Jordan Melissa Hasay
Profession: Runner
Nationality: American
Date Of Birth: September 21, 1991
Age (as of 2020): 28 years old
Birth Place: Fontana
Born In: Millennials Generation
Zodiac Sign: Virgo
Chinese Zodiac: Goat

Jordan Hasay was born in 1990s. The 1990s are characterized by the rise of multiculturalism and alternative media. Movements such as grunge, the rave scene and hip hop spread around the world to young people during that decade, aided by then-new technology such as cable television and the World Wide Web.

So what does Hasay have in store for her second act?

When she lines up for the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, it will be with the knowledge of a “great” buildup behind her. Nearly flawless, in fact. “I’m really pleased with everything,” she said on Friday. “I’m thankful that I’ve had no injuries, not even any little tweaks since Boston.

“I’d say on paper, I’m definitely fitter than Boston.”

Hasay’s training this time has been similar to what she did in the lead-up to her April race, with one noticeable difference: This time, she has the confidence that it works. “I kind of know what to expect from my training,” she said. “I’m not as intimidated by the distance. I obviously still have a great level of respect for it, but it doesn’t feel like as big a deal as it did before.”

Her mileage hovers between 100 and 110 per week. She does the bulk of it on the Nike campus in Beaverton, Oregon, where she trains with the Oregon Project and is coached by Alberto Salazar. During the summer, she also spent several weeks in her hometown of Arroyo Grande, California, and running the same six-mile route that her mother, who died last November, mapped out and where Hasay, now 26, got her start.

Those six miles are extremely hilly. “My mom chose the hardest parts of the neighborhood; some of the hills really get to you,” she said. In the buildup to Boston, the most Hasay did was three loops at a shot. This time, she did four.

Related: Amid Hasay Family’s Grief, Jordan Runs Stronger Than Ever

Other improvements on her Boston training: Her long run this time extended to 29 miles, up from the 26 she did in the spring. She did fewer tuneup races—she won the U.S. 20K championships on Labor Day in New Haven, Connecticut, then finished third at the Philadelphia Rock ’n’ Roll Half Marathon on a muggy day in mid-September.

Two weeks ago, she completed her last hard workout, which totaled 18K (about 11 miles) of work on the track, with repeat Ks, 1200s, and miles. “It was a long day,” she said. “That was actually the most I’ve ever done. I was really proud. My track workouts have gotten a lot better than before Boston.”

And on a few occasions, she’s trained alongside her Oregon Project teammate Galen Rupp, a two-time Olympic medalist who is also running in Chicago. She’d do a tempo while he was doing a long run, and he’d pace her for the first half. He would do mile repeats; she’d be doing quarters on the track. “It’s inspiring to me to see how he approaches workouts and training,” Hasay said. “We warmed up together before the Philadelphia half. Just having a teammate there is really nice.”

Salazar occasionally enlists twin brothers and local masters champions Ahrlin and Oscar Bauman to pace Hasay through her workouts on the track, and their humor is a welcome contrast to the intensity of the head coach.

Most of the mileage, though, Hasay logs alone. She’d love to have a female marathoner on her team to train with; the other Oregon Project women are focused on shorter distances on the track.

But she’s okay with the solitude. “It’s always been a sort of a meditation and reflection for me to be out on my run, so I get used to doing my own thing,” she said.

And for elite runners, it’s not unusual to find themselves alone in the late miles of a race. For Hasay, she hopes to be competing with Tirunesh Dibaba of Ethiopia and two-time defending champion Florence Kiplagat of Kenya. They are the prerace favorites, and if Dibaba runs close to her 2:17:56 PR, Hasay knows she’s unlikely to win.

But that won’t stop her from sticking her nose in it. “I’m excited that there are women there that are better than me,” she said. “I would love a PR. I think I’m ready to go—and I might surprise myself with my time.”

Sarah Lorge Butler Sarah Lorge Butler is a writer and editor living in Eugene, Oregon, and her stories about the sport, its trends, and fascinating individuals have appeared in Runner’s World since 2005.

Jordan Hasay

Jordan Melissa Hasay (born September 21, 1991) is an American distance runner. She grew up in Arroyo Grande, California, and attended Mission College Preparatory High School in San Luis Obispo. She was unanimously selected 2008 Girls High School Athlete of the Year by the voting panel at Track and Field News. In March 2009, she became the ninth high school athlete and third woman on the cover of Track and Field News magazine. She attended the University of Oregon, where she studied business administration and competed on the cross country and track and field teams earning 18 All-American honors, 2011 Mile and 3,000 meters NCAA titles. Her father was a high school basketball star in Pennsylvania, and her mother was a national level swimmer in her native England.

Before entering high school, Hasay twice set the USATF Junior Olympics Youth record in the 1500 meter run, first setting the record in 2004 with a time of 4:34.02 and setting it again in 2005 with a time of 4:28.61. She also twice set the USATF Junior Olympics Youth record in the 3000 meter run, first setting the record in 2004 with a time of 9:48.77 and setting it again in 2005 with a time of 9:35.12.

Jordan hasay chicago marathon

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