‘To the Bone’: Why Lily Collins plays a woman with anorexia after her own eating disorder

Carly Mallenbaum USA TODAY Published 10:02 AM EDT Jul 13, 2017

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — In Netflix’s new anorexia movie To the Bone (streaming Friday), Lily Collins’ character Ellen has a compulsive habit of measuring her tiny arm. The young woman wraps her thumb and middle finger around her barely-there bicep to check that her fingertips meet. They usually do — that’s how sickly she is — and indicate how small Collins chose to get for the part.

Writer/director Marti Noxon and star Lily Collins promote their film ‘To the Bone,’ about a woman struggling with anorexia. Eric Charbonneau, Invision for Netflix

Beefing up and slimming down for roles is all part of the job of an actor. But for Collins, 28, there was an added danger: She wanted to look like someone with anorexia, years after overcoming her own disordered eating, which included consuming nearly nothing, using diet pills and throwing up.

“I personally knew that this was something I needed to do to tell this story,” says Collins, who struggled with both anorexia and bulimia. “I wanted to be able to best exert my experiences on (Ellen) by going to the lengths I felt comfortable going to as an actor.”

That meant looking thin enough to worry her fans, who “lovingly, were concerned” after seeing the actress in paparazzi photos taken while she was preparing for the movie. She won’t disclose how much she lost, “but I was held accountable by a nutritionist, by (our director), by my mother, by our producer,” she says.

“There was never any time limit, there was never a (weight) number, (but) I didn’t want to get to the end of this experience and feel like I didn’t access what I needed to portray Ellen,” says Collins, who on this day at the London West Hollywood hotel looks radiant and “strong,” as the film’s writer/director Marti Noxon points out. “I can honestly say I gave it everything that I could and was able to stay Lily.”

Lily Collins felt that playing Ellen in ‘To the Bone’ was part of her “life’s mission.” Netflix

For some scenes in the film, which shows Ellen getting gradually sicker with a bruised spine (the result of obsessive crunches), sunken cheeks, furry arm hair (the body’s way of keeping a too-thin body warm) and concave belly, Collins relied on special effects. “Makeup, in general, is amazing,” she says, citing a baggy wardrobe, collarbone and cheekbone prosthetics and plenty of lighting and shading tricks to make her look increasingly bony.

But then there’s the question: Even with the help of prosthetics, why take on a dangerous role at all?

Collins saw it as the right way to bring eating disorders into the public discourse.

It all felt serendipitous, because Noxon (who didn’t know about Collins’ past struggles) sent her the script just days after the actress wrote an essay about eating disorders for her memoir, Unfiltered.

Lily Collins, right, used baggy clothes, makeup and prosthetics to help her achieve the look of sickly Ellen. Netflix

“For me, it was a sign from the world saying, ‘This is probably something that is actually bigger than you. There’s a larger thing in play here and both are going to be able to better inform one another,’” Collins says. “When you have your life’s mission and the mission of a project merge like this so beautifully, that’s like total magic.”

To Noxon, whose own experience with eating disorders inspired the movie, making To the Bone “was a weird thing of touching old hurts … to help people,” she says. “(Lily and I are) both recovered and healthy and living incredible, full lives beyond our wildest dreams. We can say, ‘Look, we’re here.’ “

Published 10:02 AM EDT Jul 13, 2017

Lily Collins was actually complimented for losing weight for her controversial role in ‘To the Bone’

Arthur Mola/Invision/AP The INSIDER Summary:

  • Lily Collins plays a young woman battling anorexia in her new movie”To the Bone.”
  • The film hits home for Collins who is a survivor of an eating disorder.
  • She recently revealed that some people complimented her weight loss without knowing it was for the film.

Lily Collins is the star of a new movie about anorexia called “To the Bone,” slated for release on Netflix on July 14. Collins lost weight under medical supervision to play the role of Ellen in the film, and in a recent interview with Net-a-Porter’s The Edit she talked about how the role affected her as a survivor of an eating disorder. She says there’s a group therapy scene in the movie where the characters are talking about eating disorders in a way she’d never heard it worded before, and you can see her understanding it in the film rather than the character she’s playing. It’s really powerful that going through the process of working on the movie helped her understand what she went through better. However, it hasn’t all been good, and she also mentioned that she was actually complimented about her extreme weight loss for the film.

Collins said, “I was leaving my apartment one day and someone I’ve known for a long time, my mom’s age, said to me, ‘Oh, wow, look at you!’ I tried to explain and she goes, ‘No! I want to know what you’re doing, you look great!'” This refusal to hear what’s actually going on, be it that a person is sick, or experiencing disordered eating, or has lost weight for a film, can be incredibly damaging. By placing something as arbitrary as weight as the thing of utmost importance, above even health, it reinforces beauty standards and says that by any means necessary, becoming smaller is the goal.

Meet Ellen from #TheTheBone. A brave young woman embarking on her journey of survival. On July 14, be part of her story — one that’s extremely unique but also similar to thousands of others out there. Dont be afraid to start necessary conversations discussing important mental health illnesses that are still considered quite taboo. Together we are never alone…

A post shared by Lily Collins (@lilyjcollins) on Jun 20, 2017 at 4:34pm PDTJun 20, 2017 at 4:34pm PDT

Collins finished the story by saying, “I got into the car with my mom and said, ‘That is why the problem exists.'” It’s so true. At the same time that Collins was being praised by some for her weight loss, she said many magazines were refusing to allow her not just on the covers but also on the inside pages so as not to send harmful messages about weight. She says of this experience, “I told my publicist that if I could snap my fingers and gain 10 pounds right that second, I would.”‘

A post shared by Lily Collins (@lilyjcollins) on Jun 22, 2017 at 6:18pm PDTJun 22, 2017 at 6:18pm PDT

To hear multiple (and conflicting) messages about our own bodies can be incredibly difficult, and Collins is right — it’s the reason why this problem exists.

To the Bone Director Says Nutritionist Made Sure Lily Collins Gained Back the Weight She Lost for Role

Lily Collins’ decision to lose weight to play Ellen, a woman battling anorexia, in To the Bone was entirely hers, director Marti Noxon says. It was a choice Collins made while being mindful of her history with anorexia and bulimia.

“We never asked her to lose a certain amount of weight. There was a discussion, and we didn’t have very much time. We only had about four weeks between her signing on and starting filming, because of her schedule. And it was really more of a conversation about what’s going to make you feel, as an actor, prepared for the role, but also how do we keep you safe, and not at a dangerous weight that’s going to be triggering for you,” Noxon tells PEOPLE.

Image zoom Netflix

“We had her work with a nutritionist, who actually worked with her throughout the entire process and for months after who, as she was gaining the weight back, was checking in with her all of the time.”

Collins said in an interview with Access Hollywood that losing weight was important to her, so she could properly inhabit the role.

“For me, I just wanted to feel like I was paying homage to the 16 year old girl that I was, that would’ve wanted to see this movie, but at the time I was just an actor playing a character,” she said. “There was never a weight goal, there was never a number. It’s something that I decided to do as an actor for a role. You lose weight, you gain weight, you change your hair color. There’s so many different things that you can physically change for a character.”

Image zoom Lily Collins Sipa Asia/REX/

Still, Project Heal, the non-profit eating disorder prevention organization that consulted on the film, wrote in an online FAQ that they do not support Collins’ decision to lose weight, especially considering her history.

“We in no way intend to endorse the idea that people with anorexia nervosa can lose weight safely. This was a creative decision on the filmmakers’ part, and filming was completed before Project HEAL got involved in the film,” they write. “There is strong research showing that getting into a state of negative energy balance and/or losing weight can make people who have struggled with anorexia nervosa much more prone to a relapse. The weight loss aspect is not something that Project HEAL supports.”

RELATED VIDEO: To the Bone’s Lily Collins Opens Up About Her Decision to Reveal Her Past Eating Disorder

Project Heal does add, though, that the filmmakers employed special effects, wardrobe and prosthetics to make Collins look more gaunt, which Noxon affirms.

“Some of the things that look alarming are really not,” Noxon says.

Lily Collins has been continuously open about her history of dealing with an eating disorder, which is, in part, what drew her to the upcoming Netflix film To the Bone. The movie follows a 20-year-old named Ellen (played by Lily) as she undergoes inpatient treatment for anorexia, meeting other young people with eating disorders along the way.

In order to prepare for the role, Lily had to lose weight – something that she was understandably worried about, given her own personal history. The actress told Refinery29 that it was a “scary process,” but she added: “I knew that, this time, I would be held accountable for it. I would be under the supervision of a nutritionist and surrounded by all these amazing women on set. So, I knew that I would be in a safe environment to explore this.”

Along with her weight loss, however, came comments from other people – some of which were pretty problematic. In a recent interview with The Edit, Lily revealed that she even received a compliment about her drastic decline in weight. “I was leaving my apartment one day and someone I’ve known for a long time, my mom’s age, said to me, ‘Oh, wow, look at you!'” the actress recalled. “I tried to explain and she goes, ‘No! I want to know what you’re doing, you look great!’ I got into the car with my mom and said, ‘That is why the problem exists.'”

Part of the issue here, of course, is that society has wired us to view weight loss as something to compliment people on. Thanks to unrealistic beauty standards, so many people view thinness as an “accomplishment,” like the person Lily encountered. These types of comments can be harmful to anyone, but especially to someone who has experienced an eating disorder in the past. Praise over weight loss can easily be triggering to someone who has engaged in eating disorder behaviors, which is why the National Eating Disorders Association encourages friends and loved ones to avoid commenting on weight or physical appearance at all. Instead, they advise to “focus on positive personality traits and other qualities that have nothing to do with appearance.” It’s a good rule of thumb for anyone; after all, you never know what someone might be struggling with internally.

If you are struggling with an eating disorder and are in need of support, please call the National Eating Disorders Association Helpline at 1-800-931-2237. For a 24-hour crisis line, text “NEDA” to 741741.

Related:

  • Lily Collins Explains Why Recovering From Eating Disorder “Doesn’t Define Me”
  • This Is What an Eating Disorder Expert Wants You to Know About Netflix’s New Movie

Lily Collins is the star of a new movie about anorexia called “To the Bone,” slated for release on Netflix on July 14. Collins lost weight under medical supervision to play the role of Ellen in the film, and in a recent interview with Net-a-Porter’s The Edit she talked about how the role affected her as a survivor of an eating disorder. She says there’s a group therapy scene in the movie where the characters are talking about eating disorders in a way she’d never heard it worded before, and you can see her understanding it in the film rather than the character she’s playing. It’s really powerful that going through the process of working on the movie helped her understand what she went through better. However, it hasn’t all been good, and she also mentioned that she was actually complimented about her extreme weight loss for the film.

Collins said, “I was leaving my apartment one day and someone I’ve known for a long time, my mom’s age, said to me, ‘Oh, wow, look at you!’ I tried to explain and she goes, ‘No! I want to know what you’re doing, you look great!'” This refusal to hear what’s actually going on, be it that a person is sick, or experiencing disordered eating, or has lost weight for a film, can be incredibly damaging. By placing something as arbitrary as weight as the thing of utmost importance, above even health, it reinforces beauty standards and says that by any means necessary, becoming smaller is the goal.

Collins finished the story by saying, “I got into the car with my mom and said, ‘That is why the problem exists.'” It’s so true. At the same time that Collins was being praised by some for her weight loss, she said many magazines were refusing to allow her not just on the covers but also on the inside pages so as not to send harmful messages about weight. She says of this experience, “I told my publicist that if I could snap my fingers and gain 10 pounds right that second, I would.”

To hear multiple (and conflicting) messages about our own bodies can be incredibly difficult, and Collins is right — it’s the reason why this problem exists.

More on body image:

  1. Perrie Edwards Responds to Accusations That She Photoshopped Her Instagram
  2. This Body-Positive Blogger’s Side-by-Side Photo Highlights How Manipulative Social Media Can Be
  3. This Mom Is Sharing How Childbirth Helped Her Love Her Body

Why a Bobby Pin Is Essential for Radiant Skin:

Follow Rosemary on Instagram and Twitter.

A NEW Netflix drama about a girl suffering from anorexia has sparked fears after scores of teenage girls hailed the character’s “gaunt” figure “thinspiration”.

To The Bone, which will be released next week, stars Lily Collins as a 20-year-old girl who has anorexia nervosa.

14 Lily Collins appears in the film as 20-year-old Ellen, who has anorexiaCredit: Netflix 14 The film’s creator has said she wants it to start a conversation about eating disordersCredit: Netflix

According to Netflix’s official description, her character Ellen “goes on a harrowing, sometimes funny journey of self-discovery at a group home”.

But the film’s trailer has sparked a stream of concerning posts on pro-anorexia websites and blogging site Tumblr, which is popular with teenagers.

The Sun has uncovered several accounts – mostly belonging to young girls – which idolise images of a shockingly thin Lily Collins in character.

Worryingly, some users described the trailer as “thinspiration” – meaning they actually saw it as an opportunity to learn new tips and techniques which would perpetuate their illness.

Others said it had given them motivation for “new body goals”.

Meanwhile, eating disorder sufferers shared fears that watching the new Netflix show would “trigger” them – meaning it would lead to unpleasant feelings and thoughts about behaviours related to their eating disorder.

14 This account described a gaunt Lily Collins as ‘thinspiration’ 14 Over 200 Tumblr users re-posted this worrying post which suggested they’d get ‘tips’ from To The Bone

One said: “I can’t wait for this movie to trigger the f*** out of me. New thinspo, new tips, new goals.”

And on chilling pro-anorexia forums, more girls can be seen describing Collins’ shrinking frame, as posted on her Instagram, as their “goals”.

One user wrote: “Does anyone know her BMI, because she has my exact body goal aesthetic.”

Another simply added: “Someone leak her diet plan.”

But not all reactions to the film have been negative – with some saying the film does not seem to glamourise mental illness in the same way as Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, which was accused of romanticising teen suicide earlier this year.

14 There are concerns that the film could glamourise the illnessCredit: Netflix 14 This user found that watching the trailer brought back difficult emotions related to their eating disorder 14 Lily Collins lost weight for the role with the help of a nutritionistCredit: Netflix 14 This blogger said watching the trailer interfered with her recovery from an eating disorder View this post on Instagram

It’s nymph time again #awaywiththefairies #RenaissanceFaire…

A post shared by Lily Collins (@lilyjcollins) on May 7, 2016 at 4:17pm PDT

One blogger pointed out: “The cast have been raising awareness about eating disorders since they started filming (early 2016),”

But mental health and eating disorder charities have still raised concerns the film could have a dangerous influence on vulnerable young viewers.

Australia’s National Youth Mental Health Foundation has warned the film could end up giving viewers a “how to” guide.

Jason Trethowan, CEO of its early intervention service Headspace, said in a statement: “The concern is about portrayal of behaviours associated with an eating disorder – and whether this may be providing a ‘how to’ guide for adolescents who may be at risk.

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“We don’t want any representation or discussion in the media, on TV, or anywhere else, that has the potential to place young people at risk.”

Meanwhile, UK eating disorders charity Beat told The Sun Online: “We very much support the media in raising awareness of eating disorders, as the more we talk about these serious mental illnesses the better we can break down stigma and, in turn, encourage individuals to seek treatment as soon as possible.

View this post on Instagram

We got this #awkwardofficialphoto vibe down @tricky44. If anyone needs tips, we’re happy to help…

A post shared by Lily Collins (@lilyjcollins) on Feb 29, 2016 at 2:17am PST

14 Meanwhile this user shared their fears about how the trailer might affect them 14 Mental health charities have spoken out about the potential harm the film could causeCredit: Netflix 14 Not all viewers were affected by or concerned about the film’s portrayal of eating disorders

“Equally, we know that when eating disorders are glamourised or trivialised by the media, this can trigger negative behaviours in people who are affected by these complex mental health issues.”

Even Lily Collins herself has revealed her shock at being complimented on the dramatic amount of weight she lost for the role.

“I tried to explain and she goes, ‘No! I want to know what you’re doing, you look great!

14 The film will be released on Netflix next week on July 14Credit: Netflix

“I got into the car with my mum and said, ‘That is why the problem exists.'”

But the film’s director, Marti Noxon – who wrote and produced Buffy the Vampire Slayer – has insisted the film’s purpose is to start a conversation about eating disorders.

She told The Sun Online in a statement: “Having struggled with anorexia and bulimia well into my 20s, I know firsthand the struggle, isolation and shame a person feels when they are in the grips of this illness.

“In an effort to tell this story as responsibly as we could, we spoke with other survivors and worked with Project Heal throughout production in the hopes of being truthful in a way that wasn’t exploitative.

14 It also stars Keanu Reeves as Ellen’s non-conventional doctorCredit: Netflix 14 Lily Collins photographed looking healthier in New York on June 26Credit: Getty Images

“My goal with the film was not to glamorise eating disorders, but to serve as a conversation starter about an issue that is too often clouded by secrecy and misconceptions.

“I hope that by casting a little light into the darkness of this disease we can achieve greater understanding and guide people to help if they need it.”

According to Beat statistics, more than 725,000 people in the UK are affected by an eating disorder.

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this article, please call Beat’s support helpline on 0808 801 0677 , or their Youthline on 0808 801 0711 between 3pm and 10pm

Lily Collins says she safely lost weight for film ‘To The Bone’

She battled an eating disorder in real life as a teenager, and was required to again lose weight for the movie.

She says she was committed to losing weight “safely” for the film, under supervision from a nutritionist.

“There was never a number in mind for the weight loss, no set goal for me. As an actor, you gain weight, you lose weight, you change your hair colour and you change yourself physically and emotionally for the different parts that you play,” she tells news.com.au.

“This was an opportunity for me to bring one of my life’s missions to more people. It’s important for people to come out and really talk about it,” she says earnestly.

“I wanted to pay homage to the 16 year old girl I was who was going through this by emotionally going back to that place, even if that took a physical change.”

Lily Collins in a scene from ‘To The Bone’. Picture: NetflixSource:AP

“Everyone has a different form of recovery and everybody has a different experience with the disorder. In doing this movie, we wanted to do something that hopefully created empathy for people that didn’t necessarily know about it. It affects people of all different sizes and shapes,” she says.

“This is a conversation that is long overdue.”

Now that filming is over, she’s healthy, and happy about her appearance. “I recently did the cover of Shape magazine, which was a huge thing for me.

“Six to eight months ago, magazines didn’t want to put me on the cover or even inside because they didn’t want to put out a negative image, even though that they knew that I looked the way I did for this film. They really stood up to that, which I really thought was kind of commendable.”

— Lancôme USA (@LancomeUSA) June 27, 2017

Unlike many celebrities, Collins is not ashamed to express herself about the demons she’s battled. “Talking about it is really empowering. I feel strong in myself and it’s that shift in the idea that food is fuel and not punishment. It took me a while to get over this disorder but I managed to make the mental shift which isn’t always easy.”

She recalls this painful period of her life which jeopardised her health.

“After a while it was pretty obvious, to be honest. My friends, family, people at school all intervened. They said to me, ‘We know what’s going on; we’ve noticed what’s happening.’ At a certain point I couldn’t really kind of hide it anymore. So it was then that I had to decide what I was going to do.” She pauses. “And I chose recovery.”

Lily Collins pictured in November 2016 in Hollywood. Picture: Frederick M. Brown/Getty ImagesSource:Getty Images

Evidently, this is a subject close to her heart and she is determined to debunk the misconceptions surrounding it. “People think it only affects women which is definitely not the case. And there is also the idea that it’s a question of vanity, which is also not the case.

“It’s a real, mental illness that deals with so much more than just physicality. It’s never about not being thin enough, that’s not what it’s about,” she says, shaking her head.

“I hope that the movie is able to better explain this illness.”

Now that she’s conquered anorexia, how does she feel when she looks in the mirror?

“I’ve learned a lot. I realise that perfect doesn’t exist. So I never look in the mirror and think that I see perfect. I see happy and I see confident and I see goofy, I see strong and I see healthy.” She smiles.

“I now talk about how I feel as opposed to how I look which is more important and that is when you look your best. We need to focus on what’s inside.”

Although her battle is long gone, what would prompt her to become an advocate for anorexia?

“Well, I had a moment two years ago when I decided to talk about. It was because I realised that I was soon going to be 28 and I wanted a family. And if I want kids, then I don’t want to pass this stuff onto them. I want to deal with it, talk about it and maybe come to a greater understanding of it. And if not now, when?”

Lily Collins pictured in Paris on July 4, 2017. Picture: Francois Guillot / AFP PhotoSource:AFP

Content warning: This post deals with eating disorders, and may be triggering for some readers.

The Netflix film To The Bone has generated heated and important conversations about the portrayal of eating disorders in popular culture, ever since it’s release earlier this month.

The film stars 28-year-old Lily Collins, who plays 20-year-old Ellen, a college drop out who is in the throws of anorexia, one of the most lethal of all mental health disorders.

Since it’s release, Collins has opened up about her own struggles with both anorexia and bulimia as a teenager.

LISTEN: Is To The Bone completely irresponsible? Mia Freedman, Monique Bowley and I go head to head on the latest episode of Mamamia Out Loud. Post continues below…

Given her past, her weight loss for the film was monitored closely by a nutritionist, although many reports claim that she lost the weight in less than a month.

But the most alarming feature of her dramatic weight loss, was other people’s reaction to it.

In an interview with Net-A-Porter Collins said, “I was leaving my apartment one day and someone I’ve known for a long time, my mom’s age, said to me, ‘Oh, wow, look at you!’”

“I tried to explain and she goes, ‘No! I want to know what you’re doing, you look great!’ I got into the car with my mom and said, “That is why the problem exists.”

Lily Collins playing Ellen in To The Bone. Image via Netflix.

Collins’ character is severely underweight and malnourished. Her appearance on screen is intentionally confronting. Yet one does wonder; would her body really be so out of place on a red carpet?

With that said, Collins told Net-A-Porter that after filming she was told “a lot of media didn’t want me in their magazines.”

“Not just on the cover—they wouldn’t put me inside looking the way I did, even though it was for a movie,” she said. “I told my publicist that if I could snap my fingers and gain 10 pounds right that second, I would.”

Since, Collins says that she has healthily put the weight back on and that her days of viewing food as punishment are well and truly behind her.

If you or a loved one is suffering with an eating disorder, Mamamia urges you to contact The Butterfly Foundation.

You can listen to the full episode of Mamamia Out Loud, here.

Lily Collins Shares How Suffering from an Eating Disorder Changed Her Definition of ‘Healthy’

Have you ever watched a woman in a movie get a beauty makeover and a new wardrobe and acquire instant confidence (cue the triumphant music)? Sadly, it doesn’t happen like that IRL. Just ask Lily Collins. To celebrate her debut on the cover of Shape, she went to dinner with two elementary school friends after the shoot and reminisced about how awkward they all felt about their bodies as teens. “We wore boys’ board shorts over our swimsuits!” she says. The irony that Collins, 28, was unwaveringly confident and at ease on set all day in one revealing swimsuit after another was not lost on her. “I never dreamed I’d be posing in a bikini on the cover of Shape. It’s a complete 180 for me. It’s a magazine about what it means to be healthy,” she says.

You see, for Collins, the struggle to get healthy was, and still is, real. And she’s refreshingly candid about it. Although she’s fit and radiant now, for more than half a decade she suffered in silence from an eating disorder that had her restricting her intake of food, bingeing and purging, abusing laxatives and diet pills, and perhaps more significantly, hiding it all from her friends and family. But after years of destructive behavior, Collins, who is extremely close to her mom (her dad is musician Phil Collins), realized that she needed to be held accountable. So she came out about her disorder. “My perspective on other people’s view of me was based on this disorder being a secret. But the more open I became about it, the more I was able to be myself,” she says. (More on that here: Lily Collins Reveals Her Past Struggle with Eating Disorders )

Speaking her truth to her inner circle eventually set Collins free to share her story with the world-and because of her journalism background, she had the chops to do it. At 15, she became a correspondent for Elle Girl U.K. (she spent a lot of her childhood in England), and in 2008 she reported on the U.S. presidential election for Nickelodeon. She was later a contributing editor for CosmoGirl and the Los Angeles Times Magazine. Her recently published book, Unfiltered, details her experience with her disease and ended up being “even more honest than I was intending,” she says. “I didn’t realize I’d cover so much.” But she was ready to talk. And that’s a good thing, because she has a lot to say. Here are the chapters on her recovery.

Image zoom

Body Image Reboot

“I used to see healthy as this image of what I thought perfect looked like-the perfect muscle definition, etc. But healthy now is how strong I feel. It’s a beautiful change, because if you’re strong and confident, it doesn’t matter what muscles are showing. Today I love my shape. My body is the shape it is because it holds my heart.”

There’s Such a Thing as Career Karma

“In October 2015, when I got the book deal, I wasn’t filming anything. Then I got flooded with work . People told me to put the book on hold, but I knew it would be worth it to keep going. And as luck would have it, To the Bone came up . Although I was in recovery for several years before the movie, preparing for the film allowed me to gather facts about eating disorders from professionals. It was a new form of recovery for me. I got to experience it as my character, Ellen, but also as Lily.

I was terrified that doing the movie would take me backward, but I had to remind myself that they hired me to tell a story, not to be a certain weight. In the end, it was a gift to be able to step back into shoes I had once worn but from a more mature place.”

Nurture and Nature

“I’m a clean eater. I love chicken, fish, and vegetables and grains like quinoa, but I don’t eat red meat. I steer clear of processed foods. I’m very farm-to-table; growing up in the English countryside, it was a way of life, not a trend. I also treat myself to the occasional dessert when I’m out with friends. But on the daily, I want to give my body what it needs to be the best version of myself. When I splurge, it’s usually on things that I’ve baked, because it’s satisfying physically and emotionally. I’m not gluten-free or vegan, but I love baking things because of the sense of accomplishment I get from creating something that’s yummy and healthy. I make everything from doughnuts to birthday cakes and banana-walnut bread. There was a time when I wouldn’t let myself taste those kinds of foods, let alone make them. I bake from the heart. I put love out there, and it goes right back in.”

Image zoom

Exercise Is Everything

“I’m a Pisces, so I love swimming whenever I can. I was on the track team in high school and hated it, but now I like to run by myself and listen to my music . But what I love most is Body by Simone. It’s a method that incorporates strengthening and toning (follow this video to try it at home). I’ve been training privately with a trainer there, and we do isometrics and ballet moves. It’s not CrossFit, but it keeps me on my toes. To be honest, I try to be active in some way every day: It’s my time to disappear and be in my own world. I can also push myself past what I thought I was capable of. Of course, if I’m traveling or tired, I give my body a rest. I used to feel guilty if I skipped a workout in the past, but now it just means life is offering up things that I want to do instead. Those ellipticals will always be there but experiences won’t.”

Beauty: Just the Basics

“I’m really quite low-maintenance. I stay hydrated, and I always remove my makeup at the end of the day and slather on sunscreen at the beginning of it. I always carry lip balm. And when I get on a long flight, I take off my makeup and let a hydrating cream sit on my skin through the whole trip. I swear by Lancôme’s Génefique mask . When you take it off, your complexion is super-radiant. I’m very aware of how important skin care is, but I try not to overdo it.”

I’m an Open Book

“I did consider that talking about my struggles with an eating disorder would overshadow my accomplishments as an actor, but I also knew this was something I needed to do to move forward as a human and an actress. I needed to let go. I’ve always strived to start conversations about taboo subjects with young women. Sharing my story in Unfiltered happened to coincide-not strategically!-with To the Bone, but I’ve always admired people who are relatable and honest. Having suffered from an eating disorder doesn’t define me; I’m not ashamed of my past.” (Related: Celebrities Who Opened Up About Their Eating Disorders)

For more from Lily, pick up the July/August issue of Shape, on newsstands June 27.

  • By By Didi Gluck

Lily Collins Is In Great Shape


Lily Collins will be on the cover of Shape Magazine for July/August 2017 and she looks great.

Lily shared her story with Shape Magazine about her eating disorder and how the disorder helped to change what being healthy means to her.

She said that she suffered from her eating disorder for years in silence without anyone knowing about it and it resulted in self-destructive behaviors. She shared the story in her book “Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me.” She spoke with Shape Magazine giving a more in-depth view of her current lifestyle and how it has changed from the past. She now leads a healthy lifestyle by eating right and staying active in her daily life. She also admits to occasionally indulging in sweets.

Her latest film, To The Bone, follows a woman with an eating disorder who was sent to a rehab center for help. She said that playing that character was a new recovery for her while she was still on her own recovery path. She got to experience it as the character and learn from the character as opposed to moving backward in her progress. She also said that she is an open book and she can now talk about her struggles with her eating disorder and how it helps her to move forward. It does not define who she is as a person and it is not something of which she is afraid.

You may read the full article here!

Check out their social media accounts for more updates!

Instagram: @lilycollins / @shape

Twitter: @lilycollins / @shape_magazine

Photo: @lilycollins

Lily Collins Embraces Her Body While Discussing Eating Disorder Relapse Fears For Shape: ‘Healthy Now Is How Strong I Feel’

Lily Collins has overcome quite a bit.

While the 28-year-old previously opened up about her past battles with eating disorders in her memoir, Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me, Phil Collins‘ daughter is once again discussing her hardships for Shape magazine’s July-August 2017 issue. Why?? Well, because, the Rules Don’t Apply actress bravely donned a bikini for the mag’s cover — something she “never dreamed” she’d do!

Related: Tia Mowry Admits She Took Diet Pills As A Teen Star

The celebuspawn revealed to Shape:

“I never dreamed I’d be posing in a bikini on the cover of Shape. It’s a complete 180 for me. It’s a magazine about what it means to be healthy… I used to see healthy as this image of what I thought perfect looked like├óΓé¼ΓÇ¥the perfect muscle definition, etc. But healthy now is how strong I feel. It’s a beautiful change, because if you’re strong and confident, it doesn’t matter what muscles are showing. Today I love my shape. My body is the shape it is because it holds my heart.”

What a beautiful sentiment. This body confidence comes at particularly important time as her new Netflix movie about anorexia drops on July 14. In fact, it seems as though Collins juggled her emotionally and physically challenging role while writing her candid tell-all.

She continued:

“In October 2015, when I got the book deal, I wasn’t filming anything. Then I got flooded with work. People told me to put the book on hold, but I knew it would be worth it to keep going. And as luck would have it, To the Bone came up… Although I was in recovery for several years before the movie, preparing for the film allowed me to gather facts about eating disorders from professionals. It was a new form of recovery for me. I got to experience it as my character, Ellen, but also as Lily. I was terrified that doing the movie would take me backward, but I had to remind myself that they hired me to tell a story, not to be a certain weight. In the end, it was a gift to be able to step back into shoes I had once worn but from a more mature place.”

Although Lily’s book ended up being “even more honest” than she intended, she’s happy to shine a light on a subject which has been viewed as “taboo.” The brunette stunner added:

“I did consider that talking about my struggles with an eating disorder would overshadow my accomplishments as an actor, but I also knew this was something I needed to do to move forward as a human and an actress. I needed to let go. I’ve always strived to start conversations about taboo subjects with young women. Sharing my story in Unfiltered happened to coincide├óΓé¼ΓÇ¥not strategically!├óΓé¼ΓÇ¥with To the Bone, but I’ve always admired people who are relatable and honest. Having suffered from an eating disorder doesn’t define me; I’m not ashamed of my past.”

We doubt the It-girl’s past will “overshadow” her acting success, especially after this summer. Not only is Lily starring in the highly anticipated flick To The Bone, but she’s also appearing in Okja alongside Tilda Swinton and Jake Gyllenhaal. Oh, and let’s not forget about her new Amazon TV show, The Last Tycoon!

We’re expecting BIG things from Miz Collins in 2017!

Lily collins lost weight

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