P90X is one of the most popular at home workout programs available today. It has been purchased by workout fanatics all over the globe in an effort to obtain the shredded, lean physique we all dream of and continues to deliver results today. One of the caveats of P90X is that it is intended for those with some sort of fitness background. If you are a beginner to exercise, it is not suggested that you begin with P90X; however, if you are ready to take your fitness routine up a notch, this is definitely a program you will appreciate.

What many who purchase P90X are not aware of is that there are different approaches to the program. P90X comes with a choice of three different workout schedules so you can tailor the program to fit your exact fitness goals. If you prefer to start off slow and want to stick with the basics, your best option is to go with the P90X Classic Workout Schedule. The other two options are the Lean and Doubles Workout Schedules. All three schedules vary when it comes to the number of resistance versus cardiovascular workouts that you will be doing each week during the ninety day training period. One variant that is constant is the single rest day you get with P90X. Whether you opt for the Classic, Lean or Doubles, you will only get one rest day per week. The beauty and a definite perk of purchasing a program such as P90X with three different workout schedules is that you can do the program three times and, each time, achieve different results. The program is extremely versatile and can help virtually anyone meet their fitness goals.

Classic

The Classic Workout Schedule features three days of resistance training workouts. This includes using free weights, dumbbells, barbells , resistance bands, pull up bars and exercise balls. The other three days you will be doing cardiovascular and yoga workouts.

Lean

The Lean Workout Schedule is geared towards those that prefer cardio activity. It is intended to help you lean out and burn fat faster. It has less of a focus on building muscle and more on cutting your muscles to make them more prevalent. With the Lean Workout Schedule, you will do cardio and yoga workouts for four days, resistance training for two days and you will have one rest or stretch day.

Doubles

The Doubles Workout Schedule is exactly what the name says. It has you doing double workouts each day. You will work out with the Classic Workout Schedule for the first thirty days on the Doubles Schedule. After that, from day 31 – 90, you will be adding a strength workout in the morning and a cardio workout in the evening. The Doubles Workout Schedule is extremely intense and was designed to give you the best results in the shortest amount of time. Although working out two times per day will definitely give you fast results, it is recommended that you begin with either the Classic or the Lean Workout Schedules before taking on the challenge of Doubles. The schedule of Doubles is demanding on the body and can cause you to overwork your body and muscles if you are not careful.

It is suggested that you consult with your physician prior to beginning any exercise program. If, after consulting with your physician you are given the go ahead to begin P90X, you can check out the P90X Workout Sheets below and see which approach you would like to start out with. If you prefer, download a copy of a P90X Workout Schedule PDF from this site or any of the Beachbody affiliated sites as well.

P90X Worksheets Download!

P90X Classic Workout Schedule

Phase 1: Weeks 1 – 3

Phase 1: Week 4

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 2: Weeks 5 – 7

Phase 2: Week 8

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Weeks 9 and 11

Phase 3: Weeks 10 and 12

Phase 3: Week 13

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

P90X Lean Workout Schedule

Phase 1: Weeks 1 – 3

  • Day 1: Core Synergistics
  • Day 2: Cardio X
  • Day 3: Shoulders & Arms + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 4: Yoga X
  • Day 5: Legs & Back + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 1: Week 4

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 2: Weeks 5 – 7

  • Day 1: Core Synergistics
  • Day 2: Cardio X
  • Day 3: Chest, Shoulders & Triceps + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 4: Yoga X
  • Day 5: Legs & Back + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 2: Week 8

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Cardio X
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Weeks 9 and 11

  • Day 1: Chest & Back + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 2: Cardio X
  • Day 3: Shoulders & Arms + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 4: Yoga X
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Weeks 10 and 12

  • Day 1: Chest, Shoulders & Triceps + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 2: Cardio X
  • Day 3: Back & Biceps + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 4: Yoga X
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Week 13

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Cardio X
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

P90X Doubles Workout Schedule


Phase 1: Weeks 1 – 3

Phase 1: Week 4

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 2: Weeks 5 – 7

  • Day 1: Cardio X in AM with Chest, Shoulders & Triceps + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 2: Plyometrics
  • Day 3: Cardio X in AM with Back & Bicpes + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 4: Yoga X
  • Day 5: Cardio X in AM with Legs & Back + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 2: Week 8

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Weeks 9 and 11

  • Day 1: Cardio X in AM with Chest & Back + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 2: Cardio X in AM with Plyometrics in PM
  • Day 3: Shoulders & Arms + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 4: Cardio X in AM with Yoga X in PM
  • Day 5: Cardio X in AM with Legs & Back + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Weeks 10 and 12

  • Day 1: Cardio X in AM with Chest, Shoulders & Triceps + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 2: Cardio X in AM with Plyometrics in PM
  • Day 3: Back & Bicpes + Ab Ripper X
  • Day 4: Cardio X in AM with Yoga X in PM
  • Day 5: Cardio X in AM with Legs & Back + Ab Ripper X in PM
  • Day 6: Kenpo X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

Phase 3: Week 13

  • Day 1: Yoga X
  • Day 2: Core Synergistics
  • Day 3: Kenpo X
  • Day 4: X Stretch
  • Day 5: Core Synergistics
  • Day 6: Yoga X
  • Day 7: Rest or X Stretch

P90X Worksheets Download!

This 20-Minute P90X Workout Will Whip You Into Shape

P90X has been around for almost 15 years and boasts a fan club of celebrities for one good reason: It works. An abbreviation for Power 90 Extreme, the 90-day program was developed by fitness guru Tony Horton as a way to build muscle and burn fat by introducing new moves that challenge the body every session. P90X covers its bases, offering elements of strength training, cardio, yoga, plyometrics, and martial arts in a series of 12 different workouts that you rotate through during the 13-week program.

ADVERTISEMENT

One of the program’s main appeals is its versatile, do-anywhere set-up. You can follow along via DVD in your living room, and most of the workouts use body-weight resistance (a few call for resistance bands or dumbbells), so you don’t need any fancy equipment. P90X touts what it calls “muscle confusion” as the centerpiece to its effectiveness: By doing multiple variations of short, high-intensity moves, the body never gets settled into a routine and therefore theoretically will never plateau (that annoying part of exercise where you’re doing the same workout as always but no longer seeing improvements in your fitness because your body has gotten used to the effort).

Probably the biggest caveat with P90X is the relatively high level of base fitness you need before initiating the program. The system call for 6 days a week of workouts, a single session can last for more than an hour, and there is very little rest built into the workouts — part of its success comes from the fact you are constantly working hard. So if you’re looking for a couch-to-5k type of deal, this ain’t it. But unlike other 20-minute workouts, if you’re reasonably fit and looking to take things to the next level, this one’s for you.

Thanks for the feedback! Oops! Something went wrong. Please contact [email protected]

While the official P90X site includes a nutritional plan along with the exercises, let’s just say it follows basic sensible eating guidelines, with an emphasis on lean protein, fewer fats, and more complex carbs. So, you know, eat like the pro athlete you wish you were, and follow the routine below — a similar workout to the official plyometrics P90X one — to get fitter and stronger in 90 days.

The 20-Minute P90X Starter Workout

Do each of the exercises below as a circuit. Repeat the full circuit three times.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jump Squats

Squat. Jump. Repeat 20 times.

Running Lunges

Lunge forward with each leg in big, deep steps four times. On the fourth lunge, swing your back leg forward and jump vertically like you’re shooting hoops. Return to lunging. Do 10 times.

ADVERTISEMENT

Side Jumps

Cross your left leg over your right leg, then swing both legs out the right side, knees bent, as you jump the air. 10 side step-jumps right, then 10 to the left.

Swing-Overs

Face a chair or bench so that you are standing just to the left of the object. Raise your right leg and swing it over the top of the chair. Shift your weight to the right side and swing your left leg over to follow. Reverse direction. Do 20 swing-overs.

ADVERTISEMENT

Box Jumps

Face the bench or chair again (make sure it’s sturdy). Bend knees, the spring up onto the platform or seat. Jump back down. Go up and down 20 times.

Twist Jumps

Bend knees and wind arms up over to the left side. Release arms and jump to the right, twisting your body 180 degrees. Bend knees and wind arms to the right side. Release and jump a half-turn to the left. Do 10 twist-jumps to both sides.

ADVERTISEMENT

Squat Jacks

Two minutes of jumping jacks, except instead of landing normally, every time your feet touch the ground, you squat.

High-Knee March

Two minutes of marching in place, raising your knees as high as you can with each step.

ADVERTISEMENT

Leapfrog

Like the game you played as a kid, this exercise starts with you crouching down, fingertips touching the floor. Stretch your arms out in front of you, then spring off your legs to catapult your body forward and into the starting crouch position. 10 leapfrogs, then turn around and do 10 back to the start.

Fast-High Feet

Like a football drill, you start this exercise by taking mini, rapid steps forward for 10 seconds, moving your feet as fast as you can. Then take slow, giant steps backward for 10 seconds, lifting your knee as high as possible with each step. Do three times.

ADVERTISEMENT

Standing High-Knee Jump

Stand, bend knees slightly, jump in air tucking knees to chest. 20 jumps.

Square Run

Place a bath towel flat on the floor. Keeping your head and upper body facing forward, take extremely small, fast steps and run your way around the towel perimeter. Do for one minute, then switch direction for one minute, maintaining a forward-facing upper body the entire time.

ADVERTISEMENT Oops! Something went wrong. Please contact [email protected] Thank you for subscribing Give us a little more information and we’ll give you a lot more relevant content Your child’s birthday or due date Add A Child Remove A Child I don’t have kids Thanks For Subscribing! Oops! Something went wrong. Please contact [email protected]

P90X Review: Does it Really Work?

P90X Review: The Short Version

It’s understandable why people would often be sceptical about these “magic” fitness DVDs because many of them are rather faddish, often not explaining exactly what is required to reach the promised goal. P90X claims to be different in that all its principles are based on sound scientific research. Alongside this, its main selling point is the fact that P90X is the only workout DVD that focuses specifically on individuals. The programme is created with your own body type in mind, and dependent on your own specific circumstances. So it will tell you what and how much to eat, when to eat and what to avoid.

You begin by figuring out exactly how many calories you need to be consuming to keep your body adequately fuelled for optimal performance whilst still keeping your metabolism boosted for maximum fat loss.

How does it work?

P90X is the brainchild of celebrity trainer Tony Horton and it combines a wide variety of exercises and moves that include:

  • Strength training
  • Cardio
  • Stretching
  • Yoga
  • Plyometrics
  • Kenpo Karate

P90X is far more varied in terms of the different training methods that it puts you through, but this is understandable as it does take up more of your time. With each workout coming in at around 75 minutes, six days a week for a total of 90 days, it’s as full-on as they come, but it’ll have you working your entire body effectively. Certain bits of equipment such as a yoga mat, pull-up bar, resistance bands and dumbbells are recommended, but it’s possible to do it without any of these as long as you have enough space to do press-ups. However, we’d suggest having resistance bands would let you get the most out of the programme.

P90X will take you through a variety of training methods, each aimed at improving your overall strength, stabilising your core and burning fat. Each week the focus will change, so it’s never feels repetitive and your body gets a chance to recover and grow while you work other muscles.

What comes in the box?

  • P90X nutrition plan (three-phase approach to eating with the aim of helping you burn fat while feeding your muscles
  • A fitness guide
  • A calendar to track your progress
  • 12 DVDs that demonstrate the correct form for each move

For each move, the P90X DVDs show a beginner and an advanced version of it so you can tailor the workouts to your level of experience and push yourself harder if required.

P90X Review: The Long Version

Eight-minute abs. Seven-minute biceps. Movie-star pecs in a weekend. If you’ve ever channel-surfed late at night, you’ve seen infomercials that promise to sculpt you into shape in ever-decreasing increments of time, all pitched by bronzed, grinning men and women with washboard stomachs. Most rely on gadgets or gimmicks, and nearly all promise a pain-free experience. P90X, a 90-day blitz of dumbbell moves, plyometrics and martial arts moves, sounds like more of the same. It isn’t.

“I honestly think anyone can do it, but you have to be dedicated,” says Bill Young, a 41-year-old business owner who’s done the full programme three times. “You can’t just go in half-hearted – you’ll never finish. If you go in with the mindset that it is possible to get through and you want to change your body for the better, then you’ll go through the fire to achieve it. I tell people who ask me about it, ‘If you haven’t been working out for at least six months, don’t try it. Don’t even watch the DVD, you’ll just be intimidated.’”

He’s right: it’s not intended for beginners. Power 90X, to give the regime its full title, is an evolution of the Power 90 series first introduced by fitness company BeachBody in the late 1990s. When company CEO Carl Daikeler noticed a gap in the market for DVDs aimed at reasonably fit people wanting to shed those last percentage points of body fat, he asked trainer Tony Horton to create something to fill that void.

X Machine

A couple of years later, in 2002, P90X was unleashed. Horton, who’s trained everyone from Bruce Springsteen to Usher, fronted the programme using a combination of perfect hair, chiselled arms and boundless enthusiasm to grab viewers’ attention. It wasn’t an instant success – BeachBody went through a reported 14 versions of its hard-sell infomercial before sales started to take off. Since then, Horton has become a familiar staple of late-night TV infomercials and a celebrity in his own right, with his own One-To-One workout range.

The enthusiastic sell, which now splices in glowing testimonials harvested from the hundreds on YouTube, is part of the appeal – so much so that P90X isn’t stocked in shops. “One of our secrets is that we don’t put the product at retail,” Daikeler told business channel CNBC in a rare interview. “It wouldn’t sell well on the shelf because part of our appeal is that inspiration that comes along with people seeing how it works on television.”

Thanks to the ad bombardment and word of mouth – including reports that celebrities such as Ewan McGregor, Ben Stiller and Ashton Kutcher were fans, as well as sportsmen such as American football player Ray Lewis – P90X has sold more than three million copies. It has brought in a total of £270 million, or roughly half of BeachBody’s entire revenue.

Those convinced by the pitch get 12 workouts on DVD, ranging from typical chest and back workouts to the less conventional “Ab Ripper X” and “X Stretch”. A big selling point is “muscle confusion” – the idea that by constantly bombarding your biceps and triceps with different moves and rep ranges they’ll be shocked into growth.

For most moves you’re encouraged to get as many reps as possible, meaning that you can hit the workouts at your own pace, and – in theory – get better results if you’re more committed. There’s also a nutrition plan, which emphasises high protein and low carbs to begin with and gradually increases carbs throughout, so trainees can attack the later, tougher workouts with more energy.

X Tested

Make no mistake: if you tackle the programme at full intensity, it is tough. The first three weeks emphasise beating your bests on the same moves rather than constantly changing workouts, so your progress is largely down to how hard you can push yourself while working out alone.

But the real question is: does it all work? Those who’ve toughed out the full programme are pretty convinced it does. “The benefits for me were loads of energy throughout the day, weight loss, body fat loss, a better outlook on life and less sickness,” says Young.

“I fell in love with it immediately,” says Ed McLaughlin, who took up the programme to lose weight after an ankle injury kept him out of the gym for months. “I noticed I was more clearly defined, I lost 4in from my waist. I actually have abs now, I have great endurance and if I wanted to I could absolutely go out and run a 10K tomorrow. I could probably run a half-marathon if I really wanted to.”

Nate Evans is especially outspoken. “I started P90X in April 2010 when I weighed in at a gross 253lb at 6ft 2in . I followed the nutrition plan and pushed hard in the workout every day. After 90 days I was down to 184lb – I lost 69lb and got in the best shape of my life. I continued with the eating plan, as it had become a habit, and am maintaining 7% body fat. This programme did so much more than change my body – it changed my life. I am so much more confident and got such a feeling of accomplishment from it. I feel like I can do anything! I quit my dead-end job, and I’m following my dreams and am self-employed now.”

Like many converts, Evans was so impressed that he became a BeachBody ‘coach’. Everyone who buys the programme is assigned one of these online mentors, who offer support and advice throughout the programme. In exchange, they get the chance to make money by selling on supplements – such as the Shakeology drink, a supplement specifically designed for P90X users – and other BeachBody products via their own personalised website. There’s a one-off ‘administration’ fee, but they aren’t expected to keep their own stock of products – just use their experience, enthusiasm, and hopefully ripped ‘after’ pictures to create new converts.

X Offenders

Not everyone is a fan. CrossFit, the training regime that emphasises Olympic lifting, bodyweight moves and short, timed workouts with a daily (free) workout posted on flagship site crossfit.com, is often compared to P90X because it promises similarly intense workouts and fat loss. However, CrossFit founder Greg Glassman – who, incidentally, doesn’t have a Horton-style six-pack – took exception and challenged P90X users to compete at the annual CrossFit Games in 2011, promising that he’d “save them a chair”.

Those who’ve tried both systems tend to gravitate to one or another depending on their goals – P90X appeals to those trying to get lean quick, while CrossFit finds its following among people who want to build athletic skills across a range of disciplines. P90X isn’t averse to throwing in bodybuilding movements, such as the classic biceps curl and triceps kickback, while CrossFit sticks to big barbell moves such as the clean, deadlift and squat. Both incorporate timed intervals, and encourage trainees to push themselves as hard as physically possible.

“They’re both better than 95% of the other stuff out there,” says Mark Sisson, author of The Primal Blueprint and founder of marksdailyapple.com. “They both include high-intensity interval training, full-body resistance work, endurance development, and mobility. They’re clearly laid out for trainees who need structure to make progress. Buy the DVDs and you get the full P90X package; log on to CrossFit every day and you get access to the daily workouts free of charge.”

But Sisson, although he’s friends with Horton and helped to create the Shakeology recovery drink, isn’t entirely sold on the system. “As it’s actually practised, I think P90X is probably too much to do as a lifelong programme,” he says. “It isn’t advertised as such, to Tony’s credit. It’s billed as a crash programme designed to get you lean in 90 days, which it does well. But committing to over an hour a day, six days a week? I just don’t think I’d have the stomach for that for very long.”

X Squared

And now there’s P90X2. Released in December 2011, the sequel pitches itself as performance and athleticism-based, a claim that has already angered CrossFit evangelists. Where the original programme’s big selling point was muscle confusion, part two’s is ‘post-activation potentiation’ – essentially, the idea that doing heavy lifting just before explosive movements will let you fire more high-threshold motor units, letting you run faster, jump higher or lift more weight. There’s a lot more jumping with some pretty tricky plyometrics moves, a new nutrition plan, a DVD devoted to yoga, and dozens of moves with names such as ‘Rocket Launcher Preacher Curl’. Horton stresses that he thinks this sort of variety is necessary for athletes in every discipline, whether it’s to improve performance or prevent injury.

The programme is certainly tougher, and in places weirder – one move sees you doing press-ups across three or four medicine balls, which would require a pretty spectacular home gym set-up. It’s still open to criticisms levelled at the original programme, which largely focused on the inclusion of ‘gimmick’ moves at the expense of basics like heavy squats. But it’s also a solid programme that mixes fitness with entertainment, and is simple to follow, if not easy to do. “I think anyone can do the programme,” says McLaughlin. “With one condition. If you commit to it, if you ‘do your best and forget the rest’, as Tony Horton preaches, then you will see results. The key is consistency.” And having some pretty tolerant downstairs neighbours

This article first appeared in Men’s Fitness in 2014

P90X: The Sequels

Since P90X was unleashed into your living room via those unrelenting infomercials, the P90 machine has spawned several reincarnations. Some are more docile, some are more ruthless. Here they are, in Horton’s own words.

P90

For the “average man” – P90X but less X-rated.

“Legendary trainer Tony Horton has now created shorter workouts that are simple, doable, and less extreme than his others, but still just as effective. After 30 days of P90, you’re leaner and more solid; after 60 days, you’re seeing muscles you’ve never noticed before, and by Day 90 you finally have that lean, strong body you could once only dream about.”

P90X3

A quicker yet not less aggressive approach.

“P90X3 combines a highly structured, plateau-busting schedule with an unprecedented variety of moves that keep every muscle challenged every day for 30 minutes of full-throttle intensity that leaves any other workout in the dust.”

Insanity

Also from Beach Body, but more unhinged.

“You work flat out in 3 to 5-minute blocks, and take breaks only long enough to gulp some air and get right back to work. It’s called Max Interval Training, because it keeps your body working at maximum capacity through your entire workout. You keep pushing your limits – so your body has to adapt. That’s how you get in such insane shape in just 60 days.”

RECOMMENDED: Insanity Workout DVD Review

Get a beach body in your lunch hour

Will you be ready to unveil your abs when the summer sun finally emerges? If not, MH has got you covered. Personal trainer Christian Finn has designed the routine you need to get you sculpted for the sand fast. “The workouts are relatively short so you should be able to squeeze them into a lunch hour if necessary,” explains Finn. “They are also grouped by movement rather than muscle group, so if the gym is busy you can quickly choose another exercise.” Whether you’re vacationing, staycationing, or just want a great new routine, read on for your foolproof plan to a stacked summer.

The routine

“This routine is designed to strip away body fat, define your chest, abs, shoulders and arms, as well as sending your strength level soaring,” says Finn. “Combine it with a decent diet for six weeks and you’ll have a beach-ready body to be proud of.”

Monday: Resistance Workout 1
Tuesday: Cardio (30-45 minutes steady-state cardio at 80-85% maximum heart rate – eg. cycling or running)
Wednesday: Rest
Thursday: Resistance Workout 2
Friday: Cardio (20-30 minutes of interval training)
Saturday: Rest
Sunday: Freestyle cardio

Pragmatic performance

The way this routine works is that you can use any exercise that fits the bill. For example, with the horizontal row you can substitute any horizontal rowing movement (e.g. seated row, dumbbell row, inverted bodyweight row). So if the bench-press station, for example, is busy, you can just use the machine press or dum-bell press instead. If all the horizontal pressing equipment is busy, you can just do press-ups instead. Feel free to change the days to suit your schedule, but try to leave at least two days between the resistance workouts.

How do you do supersets?

Using the first superset in Resistance Workout 1 as an example…

1. Start with the bench press (or any horizontal pushing exercise) and do 6-8 repetitions.
2. Then, move straight to the dumbbell row (or any horizontal pulling exercise) and perform another 6-8 repetitions.
3. Rest for 60-90 seconds.
4. Repeat for the prescribed number of sets.

You’ll be using supersets to increase the density of your workout (a measure of the amount of work performed in a specific time period). These involve moving quickly from one exercise to another, with little or no rest between. Rather than resting between sets, you perform an exercise for another muscle group. Compared to workouts that involve resting for several minutes between sets, supersets allow you to get twice as much work done in the same amount of time.

Resistance workout 1

Deadlift
3 sets x 6-8 repetitions (rest for 2 minutes between sets)

SUPERSET 1
4 sets x 6-8 repetitions
Horizontal push (e.g. bench press)
Horizontal pull (e.g. dumb-bell row)

SUPERSET 2
2 sets x 12-15 repetitions
Vertical pull (e.g. lat pulldown)
Vertical push (e.g. overhead press)

SUPERSET 3
2 sets x 12-15 repetitions
Face Pulls
Bent Over Lateral Raise

CORE
2-3 sets x 8-10 repetitions
Ball rollouts

2-3 sets x 12-15 repetitions
Reverse Ab Curl

Resistance workout 2

Barbell squat
3 sets x 12-15 repetitions (rest for 60-90 seconds between sets)

SUPERSET 1
4 sets x 6-8 repetitions
Vertical pull (e.g. pull-up)
Vertical push (e.g. seated dumbbell press)

SUPERSET 2
2 sets x 12-15 repetitions
Horizontal push (e.g. incline dumbbell press)
Horizontal pull (e.g. seated cable row)

SUPERSET 3
3 sets x 8-10 repetitions
Incline Dumbbell Curl
Triceps Pressdown

CORE
2-3 sets x 8-10 repetitions
Woodchopper

2-3 sets x 12-15 repetitions
Swiss Ball Crunch

With both workouts, rest for 2 minutes after completing the low rep (6-8) sets and for 1 minute after completing the high rep (8-10 and 12-15) sets.

Finally, for the ‘freestyle’ cardio on Sunday, you could go for a long walk, play some sport or just do the same thing as you did in the week. It’s up to you. Happy honing.

Get constantly evolving workout and nutrition plans personalised for your specific needs and training goals. Sign up to Men’s Health’s Personal Trainer tool now!

Beach Body Workout: The Best Exercises to Tone Up

Let’s get one thing straight from the beginning, everyone has a beach body. I know we become so numb to this term and probably rarely stop to think about what this means – you have a body and you go to the beach. So instead of giving you exercises to simply have a beach body (which overall doesn’t make much sense to me), I want to share the top exercises and exercise components for bringing your best, most confident self to the beach, swimming pool or lake this summer.

It’s quite easy. ? #beachbody

A post shared by runtastic (@runtastic) on Jun 30, 2017 at 3:10am PDT

1. Kick your butt into gear with compound exercises

Don’t get stuck on the adductor machine thinking you’re going to have slimmer thighs instantly. Choose exercises like lunges, jump squats or single leg deadlifts that recruit many muscles at once (including the adductors) in order to burn more calories and to train more functionally and efficiently (no wasting time!).

2. The intention and intensity of the exercise matters

More isn’t always better when it comes to exercise. You don’t need to spend hours at the gym. It’s much more beneficial when you focus on your workout and perform quality exercises. If you can text or have a conversation while you’re working out, you’re not training hard enough. Of course, it’s fine to be social during your workout and have a bit of a chat with your training partner, but be sure it’s not actually preventing you from getting the job done!

3. Get your plank on

Plank-based movements keep your abs and core working always. Even doing a push-up is giving your ab muscles some work! These dynamic plank variations find their way into my workouts every week because they are functional, require my muscles to work together (more muscles working = more calories burned!) and help me develop better coordination and control.

4. Have fun and don’t be afraid to improvise

Outdoor workouts provide an opportunity to play around and have fun while training. Head out for what I like to call an interactive run. Start your Runtastic app, head out for an easy-to-moderate run and then mix in some bodyweight exercises. You can stop at a park bench for push-ups, triceps dips or step ups and then keep running. You can also choose an object in front of you and do walking lunges or sprint until you reach that point. Do whatever you want, break a sweat and have some fun! This interval-style intensity will boost calorie burning for sure!

The Best Total-Body Fat-Burning Workout

Now it’s time to put it all together, right? If you take all of these tips into consideration, this workout from the Runtastic Results app is ideal. It’s actually a Standalone Workout that you would have access to as a paid Premium Member, but I decided to share it with everyone today!

I really hope you have an awesome summertime and feel like your best and most confident self! Do you have any tips on how to kick things up for summer? Tell us about them in the comments below.

***

The Six Week Ultimate Beach Body Plan

How to do this Workout ?

This routine consists of two workout days, Day 1 and Day 2. You will train 4 days per week. Make sure you alternate these workouts, making sure that you never train on back-to-back days.

For instance, you might lift weights on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday.

When you see a number with a letter next to it-such as 1A and 1B-it means the exercises should be performed as a superset. Do one set of the first exercise, rest for the prescribed amount of time, and then do one set of the next exercise in the group. Repeat until you’ve completed all of your sets for each exercise, and then move on to the next group.

Circuit : Do 1 set of each exercise in a group consecutively, without rests in between. Once these exercises have been completed, repeat the circuit again – doing 1 set of each with no rests in between. Continue until prescribed number of total sets are performed

Strength : Complete all sets of an exercise at the same time with rests in between. Then move to the next exercise.

Superset : Two moves done consecutively (like a circuit) with no rests in between.

MEET TONY HORTON

Tony Horton is the wildly popular creator of the best-selling fitness series: P90X®, P90X2®, P90X3®, and Ten Minute Trainer®, and most recently his 22-Minute military inspired workout, 22 Minute Hard Corps®. Tony is a world-class motivational speaker and the author of top-selling books “Bring It”, Crush It!” and his latest motivational book, “The Big Picture” 11 Laws that will change your life. He has appeared on countless television programs as a fitness and lifestyle expert to promote healthy living through exercise and proper nutrition. In keeping with Tony’s passion for a healthy lifestyle, he’s teamed up with the beauty experts at Ultimate Salon Professionals to create his new hair and skincare line, TH Care by Tony Horton, because he believes what goes on your body is just as important as what goes in it.

Tony believes that real and lasting change can happen when we commit to health as a lifestyle. Exercise, whole foods, and the right mindset is the formula that leads to a vibrant, productive and full life for anyone who focuses on being the best they can be.

P90x full body workout

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *