Mannequins look Like Followers – (MLLF)

Mannequins look Like Followers – (MlLF)
Never being a fan of wooden mannequins and never really finding a mannequin replacer that fit my tastes (R.I.P MLLY), I decided to try something different. This mod will change the appearance of the wooden mannequins to a follower of your choice. The best part is: It’s compatible with Hearthfire! The choices are almost limitless and are only restricted to the following two conditions:
*1) Mod author permissions
*2) Nexus Rules
Requirements:
– Skyrim
– Hearthfire (OPTIONAL)
– A distaste for wooden mannequins
– A love for beautifully crafted followers
– The follower mod you wish to be a mannequin
Due to the way mannequins work a new game is recommended, but not required. I will be unable to fix issues that arise from installing this mod mid game, but I will try to provide as much support as possible. I should say that the worst issue you would run across are neck gaps. This is because npc weights (mannequins included) are baked into your game save.
Details:
The choices available to you will come in phases. So far you have:
Phase One:
Sofia by djjohnjarvis and Christine Slagman
Toccata by rxkx22
Chaconne by rxkx22
Signar by Liadys
Nelthas by Liadys
Phase Two:
Belko by lolikyonyu
Mirai by kaleidx
Hikari by Choco2114
Inigo by Smartbluecat
Seranaholic by rxkx22
Please make sure you have the correct follower installed before you attempt to use any of my mannequins!
Installation:

Installation could never be easier. It’s as simple as choosing your favorite follower from my list. Once you have made your choice, head over to that followers mod page and download the follower. Don’t forget to endorse that follower while you’re there! All you need are the meshes and textures, the esp is not required, but using the follower is okay too!
Requests:
I am currently taking requests pending permissions from the authors of the followers requested. Please post your requests here.
Known Issues and Bugs:
– Mannequins will be mannequins, It’s doesn’t matter what they look like.
– So the same rules apply, such as using setnpcweight, setrace, changesex.
– If you open any of these ESP files in the CK, do not save them unless you know what you’re doing.
– Loading them in the CK will cause the Editor ID’s to change. This will break the mod if you save the changed ID’s.
– With these mannequins you might notice very slight skin tone differences. There’s nothing I can do about this.
– If you disable/enable the mannequins they will have a short neck when they reappear. Simply exit the cell, save, and reload.
– Belko Mannequin has a hair clipping issue. This is an issue with the facegen mesh. If you give the follower Belko a helmet, the hair will clip as well.
– Please report any other issues you might experience here.
Compatibility:
Obviously these mannequins are not compatible with any mod that changes mannequins. That being said, these mannequins are 100% compatible with the awesome Customizers by ClearanceClarence!
Recommended Mods:
Vanilla Mannequin Script Fix – Give those beautiful mannequins some life!

Any followers listed on this page
Immersive Citizens – AI Overhaul
Perkus Maximus and PCaPP
Katamari Dovahkiin – do it for the lulz
Anything by ClearanceClarence
Anything by Elianora
Anything by Pfuscher
Credits and Permissions:
– Under no circumstances may any part of this mod be uploaded to any other site. This mod is to remain a Nexus Exclusive.
– Language translations of the ESP are fine on the condition they remain on the Skyrim Nexus Only.
djjohnjarvis and Christine Slagman – For their awesome work on Sofia.
rxkx22 – For making awesome followers.
Liadys – For her patience with my questions, and her well chiseled followers.
Xenius – For allowing open source use of his High Resolution Scars.
lolikyonyu – For Belko and other great mods.
kaleidx – For the G.E.M.S. featured follower Mirai.
Smartbluecat – For the most unique follower on the Nexus; Inigo.
DarkWolfModding – Readme Generator
Raulfin – For XML tips and general NP++ stuff.
ClearanceClarence – For saving my sanity.. Seriously

Nike’s controversial plus-size mannequin is a brilliant business decision

  • Nike sparked debate with its recent debut of a plus-size mannequin in its London flagship store.
  • The controversy could ultimately pay off for Nike, as the incident has helped increase awareness of the company’s plus-size offerings in an industry that often lacks options for larger women.
  • Since Nike debuted its new mannequin, searches of “Nike” and “plus size” have grown by 387% and clicks on the mannequin’s tights increased 200% on British fashion retailer Love the Sales.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Nike’s controversy over a plus-size mannequin is highlighting how inclusivity can pay off.

Since Nike debuted its new plus-size mannequin at its flagship store in London, searches of “Nike” and “plus size” on British fashion retailer Love the Sales have grown by 387%, according to the company. Clicks on the Nike One Luxe Tights, which are featured in the photo of the mannequin that went viral, have increased by 200% since the start of this week.

“Newsworthy topics like the one we’re seeing with Nike usually cause huge spikes in search for the brand,” Love the Sales representative Liam Solomon told Business Insider in an email. “Search for competing brands like Adidas and Under Armour drop consequently, and this usually leads to sales growth for the brand in question.”

Read more: People are defending Nike after a journalist slammed the sportswear brand for an ‘immense, gargantuan’ plus-size mannequin

Many women struggle to find fitness gear larger than a size 12, and retailers rarely highlight plus-size women in marketing.

“There aren’t too many sportswear brands pushing plus-size clothing, so Nike is really taking advantage of this and the increased awareness around the subject of plus-size clothing will only bode well for them in terms of sales,” Solomon added.

Nike’s more inclusive lineup of mannequins. Nike

Nike launched its plus-size collection in 2017. The next year, the company added Nike Plus mannequins in select stores in North America, to “showcase inclusivity and inspire the female consumer,” according to Nike representative Sandra Carreon-John.

Original reactions to the plus-size mannequins’ debut at Nike’s London flagship were primarily positive, as people celebrated the choice as empowering and a step in the right direction.

However, journalist Tanya Gold spoke out against the mannequins in an article in The Telegraph, arguing that they encouraged fat acceptance — a movement that she believes to be dangerous, as she says it encourages people to deny health risks related to obesity.

“The new Nike mannequin is not size 12, which is healthy, or even 16 — a hefty weight, yes, but not one to kill a woman. She is immense, gargantuan, vast. She heaves with fat,” Gold wrote.

Gold’s piece sparked extensive criticism online, as people took issue with her argument that it was impossible to be plus size and healthy. Others noted that it was illogical for Gold to call for people to lose weight while also criticizing a sportswear brand for advertising to plus-size people — presumably so they could work out in the outfit.

People are defending Nike after a journalist slammed the sportswear brand for an ‘immense, gargantuan’ plus-size mannequin

  • A journalist criticized Nike for debuting a plus-size mannequin, saying the “immense, gargantuan” model promoted obesity.
  • People are defending Nike and slamming the journalist, Tanya Gold, as they push back on her claims that it is impossible for plus-size women to be healthy.
  • Others said it is illogical for Gold to say Nike shouldn’t advertise sportswear for plus-size women while also demanding they lose weight.
  • Research indicates that encouraging weight-related stigma — such as banning plus-size mannequins — makes it more difficult for people to lose weight.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Nike’s plus-size mannequins have sparked outrage over the treatment of plus-size women.

The sportswear company recently began featuring plus-size mannequins in its London flagship store. It was a move that was mostly greeted with applause, as people celebrated the choice as empowering and a step in the right direction.

—Ashley Stokes (@_AStokes_) June 6, 2019

However, Tanya Gold, a journalist at The Telegraph, had less positive thoughts on the plus-size mannequin.

“I fear that the war on obesity is lost, or has even, as is fashionable, ceased to exist, for fear of upsetting people into an early grave,” Gold wrote in her piece, which was published on Sunday.

Read more: 12 mind-blowing facts about Costco’s business

“The new Nike mannequin is not size 12, which is healthy, or even 16 — a hefty weight, yes, but not one to kill a woman. She is immense, gargantuan, vast. She heaves with fat,” Gold wrote.

Gold said that while traditional images of female beauty are unrealistically skewed, the mannequin encourages fat acceptance — a movement that she believes to be dangerous, as she says it encourages people to deny health risks related to obesity.

“The facts are obvious,” Gold wrote. “Stay that weight and you will be an old woman in your 50s. The obese Nike athlete is just another lie.”

Gold’s piece has seen extensive backlash online. Many pushed back on her allegation that plus-size women “cannot run” and are intrinsically unhealthy.

—Tegwen Tucker (@tegwentucker) June 9, 2019 —Linky Gray (@illustratedlaw) June 10, 2019 —OneWomanWalks….Europe (@WomanWalksWales) June 10, 2019 —Dr Carolyn Campbell (@carolyncjc) June 9, 2019

Some said it was illogical for Gold to call for people to lose weight while also criticizing a sportswear brand for advertising to plus-size people — presumably so they could work out in the outfit. (Nike did not respond to Business Insider’s request for comment.)

—MADELEINE (@Frenchd0gblues) June 9, 2019 —meggg (@meg_alexus) June 9, 2019 —tericka thee cutie (@terickaaa) June 9, 2019 —Third Force (@naledimashishi) June 10, 2019

Others pushed back on Gold’s logic that plus-size mannequins promoted an unhealthy lifestyle. The health and wellness writer Maxine Ali pointed out that a 2017 study in the Journal of Eating Disorders found that more than 90% of female mannequins represented medically unhealthy, underweight bodies.

—Maxine Ali (@maxineali_) June 10, 2019

While weight gain and obesity have been linked to certain health risks, experts caution against using weight as the sole way to evaluate health.

Further, encouraging weight-related stigma — such as by banning plus-size mannequins — has been found to make it more difficult for people to lose weight, according to a 2018 study of university students. Another 2014 study found that articles that stigmatized weight and obesity lead to women who view themselves as overweight to consume more calories.

Updated on June 10 at 8:30 a.m.

The debut of plus-size mannequins at Nike’s London flagship store was rightfully celebrated by many. However, a recent editorial from The Telegraph has many scratching their heads, as the publication questions whether the mannequins are “selling a dangerous lie.”

In a piece published on Sunday, June 9, one writer theorized that the inclusion of plus-size mannequins was the brand’s way of highlighting a “fat-acceptance movement…that is no friend to women.” In another section, the decision to include the mannequins was called “terrible cynicism”: “The new mannequin is obese, and she is not readying herself for a run in her shiny Nike gear. She cannot run. She is, more likely, pre-diabetic and on her way to a hip replacement. What terrible cynicism is this on the part of #Nike?”

Many have responded on Twitter and called out The Telegraph for “completely missing the point,” including the following: “Having mannequins in the store in different shapes sizes is more representative of real people. You don’t have to be any specific size shape or age to go to the gym or to wear fitness clothing.” Another follower shared their own story, saying, “I look like that @nike mannequin, and I’ve done a 10k, a half, & a marathon this year. And there’s another 10k & a half coming up. If you think obese women can’t run you’ve clearly been living under a rock.”

As brands like Gabbi Fresh and Universal Standard continue to offer clothing in all sizes, it’s great to see Nike taking that a step further and making shopping inclusive, too. As so many on social media pointed out, there’s truly no one size fits all in fashion, and it’s best to celebrate the diversity of body types instead of tearing them down.

Plus size Nike mannequin

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