Contents

Dietician shows two ‘identical’ salads side-by-side but one has double the calories

We all know salads are supposed to be healthy – but just how easy is it to differentiate between an unhealthy salad and a healthy one?

With the additions of toppings like grains, cheese, and dressing, a salad can go from a diet meal to a full-blown diet disaster – and one dietician showed just how hard it can be to tell the difference.

Australian dietician Paula Norris recently uploaded a picture of two seemingly identical salads to her Instagram.

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While both looked delicious, one salad contained just 535 calories, while the other contained 995 calories.

According to Norris, this is because “calorie-heavy dressings, too much grain and not enough veg can result in a ‘salad’ with calories closer to that of a risotto.”

Norris then breaks down the salad discrepancies and how the calories sneak into the one on the left.

In the salad on the left, Norris included one cup of cooked pearl barley, 70g halloumi cheese, 1/3 of a courgette, two florets of broccoli, some pepper, 50g of aubergine, three cherry tomatoes, 200g of poached chicken, 1/2 cup herbs, and dressing comprised of two teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil and two teaspoons of balsamic vinegar.​

Compared to the ingredients in the other salad, it is easy to see where all those extra calories come from.

The salad on the right contains ½ cup of cooked pearl barley, 35g of halloumi cheese, 2/3 of a courgette, five florets of broccoli, ½ pepper, 100g of aubergine, five cherry tomatoes, 100g of poached chicken, 1/2 cup of herbs, and dressing made of two teaspoons of balsamic vinegar and two teaspoons of seeded mustard.

However, it is not so easy to see the differences when the salads are laid side-by-side – as Norris does with her other posts of food.

According to Norris, her posts are not to encourage calorie-counting, but to “demonstrate the impact that ingredient manipulation can have on the overall calories in a meal.”

When you are trying to stick to a diet and eat healthily, it is important to know how hidden calories can sabotage you.

How Many Calories in Florette Mixed Salad

View calories and nutrition info per 1 Serving/100g of Florette Mixed Salad and see how many calories are in 100g of Florette Mixed Salad and its nutrition information.

Florette Mixed Salad Calories and Nutrition per Serving (1 Serving=1 Serving/100g)

Calories

Protein

Carbohydrate

Fat

Fibre

Alcohol

Calories (with Percentage) for each Nutrient for 100g of Florette Mixed Salad

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Calorie and Nutrition Values for 100g of Florette Mixed Salad

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A dietitian’s photo of the same dishes with different calories will show you how to build a healthier meal

  • People often think that cutting calories means eating less or giving up our favorite foods.
  • But there are plenty of ways you can slash calories without drastically changing what you eat.
  • To show this, dietitian Paula Norris posts photos of the same meals to Instagram— one of which has nearly half the calories of the other.
  • Her tips for cutting calories from meals include reducing portions, cooking with less oil, and adding more non-starchy vegetables to dishes.

Cooking at home allows you to control exactly what’s going into your food, but that doesn’t mean you’re immune to mistakes. There are a number of ways you could be consuming more calories than you think, even if you’re eating “healthy” foods.

To point out some of the most common “mistakes” that add extra calories, dietitian Paula Norris makes high- and low-calorie versions of the same meal. She then shares photos of the meals on social media and explains how they differ.

Even if you’re not trying to cut calories, Norris’ photos can provide some helpful lessons and make you rethink how you’re cooking. Here are some of her meals and her favorite tricks for reducing calories.

Eliminate fatty dressings and excess protein to build a healthy, filling salad.

Norris replaced a mayonnaise-based dressing for a combination of natural yogurt and Dijon mustard, and cut down on protein. Courtesy of Paula Norris

Protein is important, but Norris said one of the most common mistakes she sees is people consuming too much meat because they don’t understand how much protein they need. The higher calorie salad uses 300 grams of chicken — more than twice as much as the 120 grams of chicken used in the salad on the right. “100 grams of chicken or red meat in a meal is plenty from a protein perspective but main people eat upwards of 200 grams per meal,” Norris told INSIDER.

Read more: 9 fast food salads that have more calories than a Big Mac

The salad on the left has 300 grams of chicken breast fried in one teaspoon of oil, mayonnaise dressing, bacon, croutons baked in one teaspoon of oil, and 15 grams of Parmesan cheese. The salad on the right only has 120 grams of chicken grilled without oil, croutons baked without oil, homemade dressing (one tablespoon of yogurt, one teaspoon of Dijon mustard, and garlic), plus red onion and cherry tomatoes. Both salads have the same amount of lettuce and anchovies.

Pay attention to the amount of healthy fats from foods like avocados.

The salad on the right uses less cooking oil and meat with the fat trimmed off. Courtesy of Paula Norris

Norris told INSIDER that one of the most common mistakes she sees is people overdoing foods rich in healthy fats, such as avocados. “People will easily consume half an avocado, a tablespoon of olive oil, or half a cup of nuts and pass it off for being healthy,” Norris told INSIDER. Although foods like this are packed with nutrients, they’re also extremely calorie dense.

The salad on the left uses 180 grams of untrimmed steak cooked in one teaspoon of oil, two cups of lettuce, four red onion rings, 50 grams of avocado, one cup of cooked rice noodles, 30 grams of cucumber, two cherry tomatoes, two teaspoons of sesame oil, two teaspoons of lime juice, and one teaspoon of soy sauce.

Read more: 12 healthy ingredients you should be adding to your salad

The salad on the right, however, has 100 grams of trimmed steak grilled without oil, two cups of lettuce, four red onion rings, 25 grams of avocado, half a cup of cooked rice noodles, 50 grams of cucumber, four cherry tomatoes, half of a medium carrot, one teaspoon of sesame oil, two teaspoons of lime juice, and one teaspoon of soy sauce.

Measure portion sizes to cut calories without changing what you eat.

The bowl on the right uses less cheese, quinoa, sweet potato, and chicken, and adds more veggies. Courtesy of Paula Norris These bowls have the same ingredients, but different portion sizes.

In addition to watching portion sizes of meat and healthy fats, Norris told INSIDER that you can quickly cut calories by reducing the portion size of starchy carbs, like she did with quinoa and sweet potatoes in this recipe. To retain the bulk of the meal, Norris likes to add non-starchy vegetables, as she did here with zucchini, tomatoes, and capsicum.

The bowl on the left has 50 grams of feta cheese, 200 grams of sweet potato, four cherry tomatoes, half a cup of baby spinach, one-fourth a cup of capsicum, one-sixth of a medium zucchini, one cup of cooked quinoa, 180 grams of poached chicken, and a dressing of balsamic vinegar and olive oil.

The bowl on the right has 25 grams of feta cheese, 100 grams of sweet potato, eight cherry tomatoes, one cup of baby spinach, half of a small capsicum, one-third of a medium zucchini, half a cup of cooked quinoa, 120 grams of poached chicken, and balsamic vinegar for dressing.

Limit portions of calorie-dense foods, such as dried fruit.

The bowl on the right uses less muesli, no dried fruit, and uses reduced-fat yogurt instead of full-fat. Courtesy of Paula Norris

Although 170 calories might not seem like a huge difference, cutting a small amount of calories across the day can be the difference between weight gain, maintenance, and loss. The main differences between these breakfast bowls are that the one on the right uses reduced-fat instead of full-fat yogurt, less muesli and dried fruit, and more mixed berries.

Similar to how Norris bulks up her meals with veggies, adding more fruit can ensure you’re still getting a filling breakfast. Berries are also a great option because they’re low-sugar and packed with antioxidants.

Read more: 14 ‘diet’ foods that seem healthy but actually aren’t
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The bowl on the left uses three-fourths a cup of muesli, 100 grams of full-fat yogurt, one tablespoon of sultanas, one-fourth a cup of mixed berries, one tablespoon of chia seeds, and one teaspoon of pomegranate seeds.

The bowl on the right uses half a cup of muesli, 100 grams of reduced-fat yogurt, three-fourths a cup of mixed berries, two teaspoons of chia seeds, and one teaspoon of pomegranate seeds.

Eliminate cooking oil to gets rid of calories you might not have even considered.

The fried rice on the right uses less cooking oil and chicken, and more veggies and cauliflower rice. Courtesy of Paula Norris Cooking with too much oil is a common “mistake” that Norris sees people make. One of the biggest differences between these fried rice dishes is that Norris eliminates cooking oil in the later. If you can’t completely eliminate oil, Norris said using spray oil or simmering ingredients in water are good alternatives.

The fried rice on the right also uses less brown rice than it’s higher-calorie counterpart. Norris told INSIDER that using a 50:50 combo of regular rice and cauliflower rice, as she did in this recipe, is one of her favorite ways to cut calories without having to drastically change recipes.

Read more: 5 cooking mistakes that are making your ‘healthy’ meals unhealthy

The fried rice on the left uses one and a half cups of brown rice, one-fourth a cup of capsicum, one-fourth a cup of peas, half a cup of corn, half of an egg, two tablespoons of soy sauce, one-fourth of a carrot, 180 grams of chicken, and two teaspoons of oil.

The option on the right combines half a cup of brown rice with half a cup of cauliflower rice, and uses half a cup of capsicum, half a cup of peas, half a cup of corn, half of a carrot, half of an egg, eight green beans, two teaspoons of soy sauce, and 100 grams of chicken.

Use a 50:50 ratio of vegetables and wheat-products to slash calories without compromising the taste.

The bowl of pasta on the right used a combination of spaghetti and zucchini noodles. Courtesy of Paula Norris

Using zucchini noodles in place of regular noodles doesn’t affect how filling your meal is, but it does affect how many calories you’re consuming. The main difference between these dishes is that Norris used a 50:50 combo of wheat and zucchini noodles in the dish on the right, less Parmesan cheese, and leaner meat. She also eliminated cooking oil and noted that mincemeat has fat to begin with so you don’t need oil to cook it.

Read more: 10 foods to try if you want to cut down on carbs

The bowl on the left is made with 180 grams of regular mincemeat, one teaspoon of oil for cooking, 15 grams of Parmesan cheese, and one cup of cooked pasta. The bowl on the right cuts down on calories by replacing half a cup of pasta with zucchini noodles (while still keeping half a cup of pasta), 120 grams of extra lean mincemeat, five grams of Parmesan cheese, one grated carrot, one tomato, extra grated zucchini, and eliminated cooking oil.

Substitute veggies for wheat products.

The stir fry on the right contains cauliflower rice, less meat, less oil, and more veggies. Courtesy of Paula Norris

If you want to cut even more calories, you can completely replace white rice with cauliflower rice, as Norris did in the dish on the right. She also used less meat and eliminated pan oil. “You get fats in the meat and sauce, and a bit of water will be adequate if you’re using a nonstick pan,” she wrote on her Instagram.

The bowl on the right also has more low-starch veggies, such as broccoli, carrots, pepper, and zucchini. “There is no better way to remain satisfied and get plenty of nutrients and fiber in without going overboard with calories,” she told INSIDER. She said that some of her favorite lower calorie vegetables are broccoli, zucchini, carrot, tomatoes, capsicum, tomatoes, eggplant, cucumber, squash, spinach, kale, cauliflower, asparagus, bok choy, and peas.

The stir-fry on the left uses one cup of white rice, one tablespoon of sweet chili sauce, pan oil, and 180 grams of meat. The option on the right replaces the white rice with a cup of cauliflower rice, two teaspoons of Sriracha, no pan oil, 80 grams of meat, and adds lots of veggies.

Ditch starchy carbs altogether.

The “tacos” on the right use lettuce wraps instead of flour tortillas. Courtesy of Paula Norris

Replacing lettuce wraps for tortillas is an easy way to cut down on calories without compromising the bulk of your meal. Eliminating carbs entirely can leave you hungry, so Norris added red kidney beans to the dish on the right to keep it filling. Another big difference between the meals is that the right uses less avocado, no cooking oil, and leaner meat.

It also uses Parmesan cheese instead of cheddar cheese. Norris said this is one of her favorite swaps because Parmesan has a much sharper flavor so you can get away with much less.

The plate on the right uses three soft shell tacos, one teaspoon of cooking oil, half of a garlic clove, half of a brown onion, 200 grams of regular mincemeat, half a tin of tomatoes, taco seasoning, four cherry tomatoes, one-fourth of a small corn cob, 50 grams of avocado, and 40 grams of full-fat cheddar cheese.

The plate on the right replaces tortillas with lettuce leaves, uses a tablespoon of water instead of cooking oil, half of a garlic clove, half of a brown onion, 100 grams of extra-lean mincemeat, 70 grams of red kidney beans, one small grated carrot, half a tin of tomatoes, taco seasoning, eight cherry tomatoes, 25 grams of diced capsicum, one-fourth of a small corn cob, 25 grams of avocado, and 10 grams of Parmesan cheese.

Use smaller portions of starches.

The burrito on the right is made with a smaller wrap, less cheese, less avocado, no oil, and leaner meat. Courtesy of Paula Norris

The size of the wrap is one obvious change between these photos, and it accounts for about 100 calories difference. But the other changes can save you an extra 300 calories, Norris wrote on Instagram. Some other differences are that Norris eliminated cooking oil for the burrito on the left, used extra-lean meat, and less cheese.

Norris told INSIDER that she loves adding carrots, zucchini, or fresh and tinned tomatoes to tacos and burritos that use ground red meat. She also added black beans to make up for some of the meat she reduced from the higher-calorie burrito.

Read more: 12 foods you didn’t realize have carbs in them

The burrito on the left uses a large wrap, one teaspoon of cooking oil, half of a brown onion, 160 grams of regular mincemeat, taco seasoning, half a tin of tomatoes, one cup of lettuce, half of a tomato, 50 grams of avocado, and 40 grams of cheese.

The burrito on the right uses a medium wrap, no cooking oil, half of a brown onion, 100 grams of extra-lean mincemeat, 50 grams of black beans, one-third of a zucchini, half of a medium carrot, taco seasoning, half a tin of tomatoes, one cup of lettuce, half of a tomato, 25 grams of avocado, and 20 grams of low-fat cheese.

Bulk up your meal by adding more non-starchy veggies.

The bowl of pasta on the right contains less chicken, cheese, and pasta, and more veggies. Courtesy of Paula Norris

If you’re cutting down on the portion of the main ingredient in your dish, such as pasta, you can add more veggies to keep the meal filling. The main difference between these dishes is that the bowl of pasta on the right uses less pasta, less chicken, no cooking oil, less cheese, and more veggies.

The bowl on the left uses two teaspoons of olive oil, 200 grams of chicken, 30 grams of semi-trimmed bacon, two cups of cooked pasta, 30 grams of full-fat cheddar cheese, one medium mushroom, and two large broccoli florets.

Read more: Some of the most filling foods you can eat, according to nutritionists

The dish on the right uses 100 grams of chicken cooked in a little water instead of oil, one cup of cooked pasta, one teaspoon of capers, 10 grams of low-fat cheddar cheese, one-fourth of a large capsicum, four large broccoli florets, and two medium mushrooms. Both recipes contain 100 milliliters of tomato sauce, one tablespoon of tomato paste, one garlic clove, one-fourth of a red onion, two anchovies, and herbs.

Norris’ meals show that healthy eating doesn’t have to be boring and it definitely doesn’t require giving up our favorite foods. It just might require more attention to portion size and a little creativity.

Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more.

Calories in Vegetables

Our chart shows how many calories in a selection of vegetables and vegetable products.

You can search our UK food and drink database to find calories and nutritional information in fruit and vegetables as well as thousands of other branded and unbranded foods. Take Our Free Trial “

Artichoke, Fresh, Raw

Calories in 100g of artichoke

Calories

47kcal

Carbohydrate

10.5g

Protein

3.3g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

5.4g

Calories in a serving (80g) of artichoke: 38kcal

Asparagus, Trimmed, Raw

Calories in 100g of asparagus

Calories

24.4kcal

Carbohydrate

1.9g

Protein

2.9g

Fat

0.6g

Fibre

1.7g

Calories in a serving (80g) of asparagus: 19.5kcal

Aubergine, Fresh, Raw

Calories in 100g of aubergine

Calories

14kcal

Carbohydrate

2.1g

Protein

0.9g

Fat

0.4g

Fibre

1.9g

Calories in a serving (80g) of aubergine: 12kcal

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Imperial Metric

Baked Potato, Flesh & Skin

Calories in 100g of jacket potato

Calories

109.0kcal

Carbohydrate

25.2g

Protein

2.3g

Fat

0.1g

Fibre

2.4g

Calories in a jacket potato (180g): 196.2kcal

Beans, Broad, Fresh, Raw

Calories in 100g of broad beans

Calories

97kcal

Carbohydrate

11.7g

Protein

7.9g

Fat

0.6g

Fibre

6.5g

Calories in a serving (80g) of broad beans: 78kcal

Beans, Runner

Calories in 100g of runner beans

Calories

19kcal

Carbohydrate

2.8g

Protein

1.3g

Fat

0.4g

Fibre

2.2g

Calories in a serving (80g) of runner beans: 15kcal

Beetroot, Boiled

Calories in 100g of boiled beetroot

Calories

44kcal

Carbohydrate

10g

Protein

1.7g

Fat

0.18g

Fibre

2g

Calories in a serving (100g) of boiled beetroot: 44kcal

Broccoli, Raw

Calories in 100g of raw broccoli

Calories

30.8kcal

Carbohydrate

1.7g

Protein

3.9g

Fat

0.9g

Fibre

2.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of raw broccoli: 24.6kcal

Broccoli, Boiled, Average

Calories in 100g of broccoli

Calories

24.0kcal

Carbohydrate

1.1g

Protein

3.1g

Fat

0.8g

Fibre

2.3g

Calories in a serving (30g) of brocoli: 7kcal

Brussels Sprouts, Raw

Calories in 100g of brussels sprouts

Calories

35kcal

Carbohydrate

3.1g

Protein

3.3g

Fat

1g

Fibre

2.9g

Calories in a serving (80g) of brussels sprouts: 28kcal

Butternut Squash, Raw, Unprepared

Calories in 100g of butternut squash

Calories

30kcal

Carbohydrate

6.8g

Protein

0.9g

Fat

0.1g

Fibre

1.3g

Calories in a serving (80g) of butternut squash: 24kcal

Cabbage, Boiled, Average

Calories in 100g of boiled cabbage

Calories

15.3kcal

Carbohydrate

2.2g

Protein

1.0g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

1.7g

Calories in a serving (135g) of cabbage: 21kcal

Cabbage, Red, Raw

Calories in 100g of red cabbage

Calories

27kcal

Carbohydrate

5g

Protein

1.2g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

2.1g

Calories in a serving (80g) of red cabbage: 22kcal

Carrots, Raw

Calories in 100g of carrots

Calories

43kcal

Carbohydrate

10.1g

Protein

1.03g

Fat

0.19g

Fibre

3g

Calories in a carrot (60g): 25.8kcal

Carrots, Fresh, Boiled in Salted Water

Calories in 100g of carrots

Calories

22.0kcal

Carbohydrate

4.4g

Protein

0.6g

Fat

0.4g

Fibre

2.3g

Calories in a carrot (60g): 13kcal

Cauliflower, Boiled

Calories in 100g of boiled cauliflower

Calories

28kcal

Carbohydrate

2.1g

Protein

2.9g

Fat

0.9g

Fibre

1.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of boiled cauliflower: 22.4kcal

Celery, Raw

Calories in 100g of celery

Calories

7.0kcal

Carbohydrate

0.9g

Protein

0.5g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.0g

Calories in a serving (40g) of celery: 3kcal

Chips, Deep Fried, Average

Calories in 100g of deep fried chips

Calories

204.5kcal

Carbohydrate

29.6g

Protein

3.16g

Fat

8.4g

Fibre

1.2g

Calories in a small serving (130g) of deep fried chips: 265.9kcal

Chips, Beefeater, Deep Fried, McCain

Calories in 100g of chips

Calories

253.0kcal

Carbohydrate

37.7g

Protein

3.3g

Fat

9.9g

Fibre

0.0g

Calories in a portion (100g) of chips: 253kcal

Courgette, Raw

Calories in 100g of courgette

Calories

18kcal

Carbohydrate

1.8g

Protein

1.8g

Fat

0.4g

Fibre

0.9g

Calories in a serving (80g) of courgette: 14.4kcal

Cucumber, Raw

Calories in 100g of cucumber

Calories

10kcal

Carbohydrate

1.5g

Protein

0.7g

Fat

0.1g

Fibre

0.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of cucmber: 8kcal

Fennel, Raw

Calories in 100g of fennel

Calories

12kcal

Carbohydrate

1.8g

Protein

0.9g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

2.4g

Calories in a serving (80g) of fennel: 10kcal

Green Beans, Fine

Calories in 100g of fine green beans

Calories

23.5kcal

Carbohydrate

3.15g

Protein

1.8g

Fat

0.41g

Fibre

2.92g

Calories in a serving (80g) of fine grean beans: 18.8kcal

Kale, Raw

Calories in 100g of kale

Calories

28kcal

Carbohydrate

1.2g

Protein

2.9g

Fat

1.4g

Fibre

2.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of kale: 22kcal

Lettuce, Average

Calories in 100g of lettuce

Calories

14.3kcal

Carbohydrate

1.8g

Protein

1.1g

Fat

0.33g

Fibre

1.2g

Calories in a serving (shredded, 28g) of lettuce: 4kcal

Lettuce, Iceberg

Calories in 100g of lettuce

Calories

13.1kcal

Carbohydrate

1.8g

Protein

0.8g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

0.4g

Calories in a serving (28g) of lettuce: 3.7kcal

Lettuce, Little Gem

Calories in 100g of lettuce

Calories

15kcal

Carbohydrate

1.8g

Protein

0.8g

Fat

0.5g

Fibre

0.73g

Calories in a serving (90g) of Little Gem lettuce: 13.5kcal

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Mashed Potato (with Butter)

Calories in 100g of mashed potato

Calories

104.0kcal

Carbohydrate

15.5g

Protein

1.8g

Fat

4.3g

Fibre

1.1g

Calories in a serving (28g) of mashed potato: 29kcal

Mixed Leaf Salad

Calories in 100g of mixed leaf salad

Calories

18.7kcal

Carbohydrate

2.9g

Protein

1.2g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.8g

Calories in a serving (80g) of mixed leaf salad: 15kcal

Mixed Salad, Tesco

Calories in 100g of salad

Calories

24.0kcal

Carbohydrate

4.2g

Protein

1.0g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

2.0g

Calories in a serving (100g) of salad: 24kcal

Mixed Vegetables, Frozen

Calories in 100g of frozen mixed veg

Calories

42.7kcal

Carbohydrate

6.5g

Protein

2.8g

Fat

0.7g

Fibre

2.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of frozen mixed veg: 34.2kcal

Mushrooms, Button, Raw

Calories in 100g of Button Mushrooms

Calories

14.8kcal

Carbohydrate

0.5g

Protein

2.34g

Fat

0.44g

Fibre

1.2g

Calories in a serving (50g) of Button Mushrooms: 7.4kcal

Mushrooms, Closed Cap, Raw

Calories in 100g of closed cap mushrooms

Calories

13.5kcal

Carbohydrate

0.4g

Protein

1.8g

Fat

0.5g

Fibre

1.08g

Calories in a serving (handful, 30g) of closed cap mushrooms: 4.05kcal

Mushrooms, Fried, Average

Calories in 100g of mushrooms

Calories

157.0kcal

Carbohydrate

0.3g

Protein

2.4g

Fat

16.2g

Fibre

1.5g

Calories in a serving (28g) of mushrooms: 44kcal

Olives, Black, Pitted

Calories in 100g of black olives

Calories

164kcal

Carbohydrate

3.5g

Protein

1g

Fat

16.2g

Fibre

3.1g

Calories in half a jar (82g) of black olives: 135kcal

Olives, Green, Pitted

Calories in 100g of gree olives

Calories

130kcal

Carbohydrate

0.9g

Protein

1.1g

Fat

13.3g

Fibre

2.5g

Calories in half a jar (82g) of green olives: 106kcal

Onions, Raw, Average

Calories in 100g of onions

Calories

38.2kcal

Carbohydrate

8g

Protein

1.2g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.3g

Calories in a serving (28g) of onions: 10.7kcal

Onion, Red, Raw

Calories in 100g of red onion

Calories

36.7kcal

Carbohydrate

7.9g

Protein

1.2g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.5g

Calories in a serving (28g) of red onion: 10.3kcal

Onion, Spring, Raw

Calories in 100g of spring onion

Calories

25kcal

Carbohydrate

3g

Protein

2g

Fat

0.5g

Fibre

1.5g

Calories in a serving (28g) of spring onion: 7kcal

Parsnip, Raw

Calories in 100g of parsnip

Calories

62kcal

Carbohydrate

11.6g

Protein

1.7g

Fat

1g

Fibre

4.3g

Calories in a serving (80g) of parsnip: 49kcal

Peas, Frozen

Calories in 100ml of frozen peas

Calories

72.8kcal

Carbohydrate

9.7g

Protein

6g

Fat

1g

Fibre

4.6g

Calories in a serving (85g) of frozen peas: 61.9kcal

Peas, Garden, Canned, Drained, Tesco

Calories in 100g of peas

Calories

55.0kcal

Carbohydrate

7.1g

Protein

4.8g

Fat

0.6g

Fibre

4.8g

Calories in a serving (93g) of peas: 49kcal

Peas, Sugar Snap

Calories in 100g of sugar snap peas

Calories

33kcal

Carbohydrate

4.8g

Protein

3.2g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.4g

Calories in a serving (80g) of sugar snap peas: 27kcal

Potatoes, New, Boiled

Calories in 100g of boiled new potatoes

Calories

72kcal

Carbohydrate

17g

Protein

1.8g

Fat

0.1g

Fibre

1.2g

Calories in a serving (100g) of boiled new potatoes: 72kcal

Potatoes, Roast

Calories in 100g of roast potatoes (roasted in oil)

Calories

149kcal

Carbohydrate

25.9g

Protein

2.9g

Fat

4.5g

Fibre

1.8g

Calories in a serving (100g) of roast potatoes: 149kcal

Peppers, Green, Average

Calories in 100g of green peppers

Calories

15kcal

Carbohydrate

2.6g

Protein

0.8g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

1.6g

Calories in a serving (28g) of green pepper: 4.2kcal

Pepper, Red, Average

Calories in 100g of peppers

Calories

26.6kcal

Carbohydrate

5.3g

Protein

0.8g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

1.3g

Calories in a serving (28g) of red pepper: 7.4kcal

Peppers, Yellow, Average

Calories in 100g of peppers

Calories

26kcal

Carbohydrate

5.3g

Protein

1.2g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.7g

Calories in a serving (28g) of yellow pepper: 7.3kcal

Pumpkin, Raw

Calories in 100g of pumpkin

Calories

26kcal

Carbohydrate

6.5g

Protein

1g

Fat

0.1g

Fibre

0.5g

Calories in a serving (80g) of pumpkin: 21kcal

Radish, Raw

Calories in 100g of radish

Calories

12kcal

Carbohydrate

1.9g

Protein

0.7g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

0.9g

Calories in a serving (28g) of radish: 3.4kcal

Rocket, Fresh, Raw

Calories in 100g of Rocket

Calories

15.6kcal

Carbohydrate

1.7g

Protein

0.8g

Fat

0.53g

Fibre

1.1g

Calories in a serving (80g) of Rocket: 12.5kcal

Spinach, Baby

Calories in 100g of Baby Spinach

Calories

25kcal

Carbohydrate

1.6g

Protein

2.8g

Fat

0.8g

Fibre

2.1g

Calories in a serving (90g) of Baby Spinach: 22.5kcal

Swede, Raw

Calories in 100g of swede

Calories

24kcal

Carbohydrate

5g

Protein

0.7g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

1.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of swede: 19kcal

Sweet Potato, Boiled

Calories in 100g of sweet potato

Calories

84kcal

Carbohydrate

21g

Protein

1.1g

Fat

0.3g

Fibre

2.3g

Calories in an average sweet potato (200g): 168kcal

Sweetcorn, Canned

Calories in 100g of sweetcorn

Calories

79kcal

Carbohydrate

15g

Protein

2.7g

Fat

1.1g

Fibre

1.6g

Calories in a serving (80g) of sweetcorn: 63kcal

Sweetcorn, Cob

Calories in 100g of sweet potato

Calories

31kcal

Carbohydrate

5.7g

Protein

1.2g

Fat

0.6g

Fibre

0.9g

Calories in an average cob (200g): 63kcal

Tomatoes, Tinned, Chopped

Calories in 100g of tinned chopped tomatoes

Calories

19.22kcal

Carbohydrate

3.32g

Protein

1.08g

Fat

0.16g

Fibre

0.92g

Calories in a serving (100g) of tinned chopped tomatoes: 19.22kcal

Tomato, Fresh, Raw

Calories in 100g of fresh raw tomato

Calories

18kcal

Carbohydrate

3.92g

Protein

0.88g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.2g

Calories in 1 medium tomato (123g): 22.1kcal

Tomato, Cherry, Raw

Calories in 100g of cherry tomatoes

Calories

18kcal

Carbohydrate

3.04g

Protein

0.73g

Fat

0.32g

Fibre

0.54g

Calories in a serving (80g) of cherry tomatoes: 14.4kcal

Tomatoes, Plum, Baby, Raw

Calories in 100g of Baby Plum Tomatoes

Calories

18.3kcal

Carbohydrate

2.3g

Protein

1.5g

Fat

0.33g

Fibre

1g

Calories in a serving (50g) of baby plum tomatoes: 9.2kcal

Turnip, Raw

Calories in 100g of turnip

Calories

17kcal

Carbohydrate

3.5g

Protein

0.7g

Fat

0.2g

Fibre

1.8g

Calories in a serving (80g) of turnip: 14kcal

Watercress, Raw, Trimmed

Calories in 100g of watercress

Calories

22kcal

Carbohydrate

0.4g

Protein

3g

Fat

1g

Fibre

1.5g

Calories in one bunch (10g) of watercress: 0kcal

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Nutrition Facts

1. Put the vermicelli noodles in a large bowl, then pour boiling water over top until they are covered.

2. Put a pan or something on top to cover and let them soak until tender, or about 4 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water.

3. Let the noodles sit and drain for about 5-10 minutes. You want to drain as much water as possible.

4. Chop up the noodles a bit and mix them in a bowl with the carrots, cucumber, green onion, mint, cilantro, and sesame oil.

(If desired toss with peanut sauce to coat) Set aside.

5. Pour about 2 inches of hot water into a pie plate and completely submerge a rice paper wrapper. Let it sit for about 10-15 seconds until it is softened. Remove from the water, let the excess drip off, and carefully lay it on the counter in front of you.

6. Mound about 1/4-1/3 cup of the noodle filling near the edge closest to you, in a log shape.

7. Fold the sides in and, rolling away from yourself, tightly roll up.

8. Set the finished salad roll on a plate that is covered with a damp paper towel.

9. Continue with the rest of the rice paper wrappers. As the water cools in the pie plate, you will have to top it up to make it warm again.

10. Serve on a plate garnished with chopped fresh chilis, green onion, and peanut sauce on the side to dip.
Enjoy!

Calories in Clean Eatz Build Your Own Salad

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