Treadmill Music: 10 Songs with the Perfect Tempo

Most treadmill runners take about 130 to 150 strides per minute. The perfect indoor running playlist includes songs with matching beats per minute, as well as a few faster and slower tracks to help keep the workout interesting. This playlist fits the bill, with some lusty funk from Bruno Mars, a classic from Steppenwolf, and LMFAO’s remix of a Madonna/Nicki Minaj collaboration.

Here’s the full list, according to votes placed at RunHundred.com, the web’s most popular workout music website.

Avicii – Levels (Skrillex Remix) – 142 BPM

Carrie Underwood – Good Girl – 130 BPM

Bruno Mars – Locked out of Heaven – 146 BPM

Don Omar & Lucenzo – Danza Kuduro – 130 BPM

Train – 50 Ways to Say Goodbye – 139 BPM

Calvin Harris & Ne-Yo – Let’s Go – 130 BPM

Steppenwolf – Born to Be Wild – 145 BPM

Havana Brown & Pitbull – We Run the Night – 136 BPM

Madonna, Nicki Minaj & LMFAO – Give Me All Your Luvin’ (Party Rock Remix) – 132 BPM

Tommy James & The Shondells – I Think We’re Alone Now – 131 BPM

To find more workout songs, check out the free database at Run Hundred. You can browse by genre, tempo, and era to find the best songs to rock your workout.

  • By Chris Lawhorn

The treadmill display says 7.9km. I will get to 10, I always do, but some days it feels like an impossible feat. Sweat is raining off my arms on to the adjacent machine and I look at the girl who’s power walking next to me, apologetically. I can taste my heart in the back of my throat and my lungs feel like two brussels sprouts. Then some Yazoo-like synths pour from the speakers on the ceiling and a new video plays on the big screen – it’s Example’s Changed the Way You Kiss Me. The track picks up pace, and when it breaks for the first time, I find I’m not staring at the emergency stop button any more, I’m back in the zone – a new, fiercer zone – running hard and (I wince as I’m writing this) really feeling the music.

After Example comes Lady Gaga’s Judas, that new Calvin Harris one, David Guetta feat Kelly Rowland’s When Love Takes Over, and a load of other bangers – mostly top 40, some slightly older. I’ve hit 11km without even realising. The music my gym (Fitness 4 Less, in Hackney) plays is like an extra respiratory system for me when I’m running; it keeps me going when my body wants to give up.

Being galvanised by pumping music while exercising isn’t exactly a revelation. What is, though, is that I’ve realised the gym is the only place I hear chart music. I doubt I would have heard that Example song anywhere other than at the gym. It certainly helps that for quite a while now the charts have been dominated by dance music. That big, Ibiza-y David Guetta sound has permeated everything. All the better for the likes of me – a personal trainer in the gym tells me the average maximum heart rate someone in their late 20s should be training at is between 156-160bpm, and that any music over 120bpm is best for working out to. Incidentally, Changed the Way You Kiss Me is 130bpm.

I feel like there are chemical reactions that make me like this music, because I didn’t before I started going to the gym. I don’t really go “clubbing” any more, listen to radio chart shows or keep track of these things online. I just don’t care. But hearing them in the gym makes me care, and makes me aware. It means I can join in music-related conversations with my 21-year-old brother, which feels like a milestone.

When I first started running, my iPod playlists were full of hip-hop and, er, 80s rock such as Toto (Africa remains my ultimate running pick-me-up). I downloaded LCD Soundsystem’s 45:33 at one point, but just found it irritating – it sounded like those off-putting mechanical wheezing noises a treadmill makes. Now I don’t even take an iPod to the gym. I rely on, and look forward to, the music they play. And when I run outside my iPod is full of the things I’ve heard in the gym and then downloaded at home.

It’s a curious relationship with new music, for the discoveries to happen while in a gym. It’s like going to the gym has opened a whole new (questionable) taste compartment in my brain. Perhaps it’s the endorphin-flooded state my body is in at the time, meaning that when I hear the song again I associate it with feeling good. More often than not, when the big screen showing videos to songs isn’t on to let me know what I’m listening to, I’ll become so pumped and fixated on songs that I go home and search for them with lyrics I have memorised. An example: a few months ago I kept hearing a song about “beautiful people”, its Euro-poppy hook building into this gloriously cheesy, mesmeric banger with a vaguely familiar voice singing about inner beauty and taking “your sexy time”. I like the idea of time being sexy and was – quite privately – obsessed. I typed “beautiful people lyrics” into Google and it turned out it was Beautiful People by Chris Brown, feat Benny Benassi. My heart sank into my trainers. I’m sure this will divide opinion, but I don’t really want to like any of his music. I can’t help it. But I also can’t help loving that song. I downloaded it, and listen to it constantly when I’m running, and that’s that.

A few friends who use gyms have had similar experiences with discovering, and for the most part ending up liking, new music. In spite of their usual musical preferences. Some gyms are better than others, though. A friend who is a member of Fitness First says it has its own version of an MTV-style channel, Fitness First Television, (catchy, that) which he says is “erratic”, with oddly timed “baby-making music” interludes. A friend who uses Virgin Active says it only seems to play artists signed to Virgin, which must be limiting. Another friend, who uses Gymbox, says it has live DJs. Live DJs! In a gym! Like a nightclub with treadmills instead of a dancefloor! I guess it makes sense, as this music seems made – no, scientifically designed – for people dancing in clubs, invariably on drugs, whereas hard exercise can produce its own rushes and emotional highs, albeit healthier ones.

So has the gym helped others discover the joys of chart music? Which tracks get your pulse racing? And is it ever OK to enjoy working out to Chris Brown?

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Please take a moment to appreciate one of the internet’s greatest gifts: the Party Rock Anthem music video set to other songs.

LMFAO’s Party Rock Anthem captures the spirit of 2011, from the thick rimmed glasses, to the skinny jeans, to the inexplicable trend of wearing vests over T-shirts. Although the song is now rarely played at public events other than sweet sixteens and unfortunate weddings, it’s still a beloved piece of pop culture. It’s so thoroughly enjoyed, it went diamond earlier this year, snagging 10 million units through song sales and streams.

But in case the infectious beat and enthusiastic lyrics are too much for you to actually enjoy, Twitter has your back. People have been setting the music video’s upbeat choreography to other songs that have the same beats per minute, and the results are hilarious.

The meme originated with @Josejusejo, who realized that the music video synced up perfectly with the Evangelion theme song, which created an unfortunate nightmare blending anime and 2011 party culture.

Party Rock Anthem has the same BPM as the Evangelion Opening and I hate it pic.twitter.com/UC2WzNF3zN

— 👻🎃 Spooky Joseju 🎃👻 (@Josejusejo) September 18, 2018

It went viral, and other Twitter users began adding their favorite songs to the LMFAO classic. Here are a few of the best edits:

Party Rock Anthem has the same bpm as Uptown Girl pic.twitter.com/vt7B1mQIqA

— Stan Lewis (@StanLewis_) October 4, 2018

why yes, I have been putting anything at 129 bpm to Party Rock Anthem’s dance scene thanks to @StanLewis_ … just when you thought Sweet Caroline couldn’t be funkier pic.twitter.com/w74HsoAcFC

— cuppycup (@cuppycup) October 4, 2018

Hey guys did you know @depechemode ‘s “Personal Jesus” has the same bpm as Party Rock Anthem? pic.twitter.com/SfwTC7yIF9

— Slimey Snails 🎃🎃🎃 (@Bag_of_Snails) October 5, 2018

did you also know Party Rock Anthem has the same bpm as Smooth by Santana featuring Rob Thomas? pic.twitter.com/Q0JOIRw6Bp

— cuppycup (@cuppycup) October 4, 2018

someone needs to ban me from google so i can’t search for ‘panic! at the disco songs that have the same bpm as party rock anthem’ because then things like this happen pic.twitter.com/9Gft9wxqFS

— olivia (@josephtrohmans) October 5, 2018

I don’t know why I made another one of these but I did
this really does have the same BPM as Party Rock Anthem this time pic.twitter.com/qmyPZdOsgw

— Grey @ 😈HELL ZONE🌸 (@Lightning_Grey) October 2, 2018

Party Rock Anthem has the same bpm as Dropkick Murphys’ “I’m Shipping Up to Boston.” #lmfao #BPM pic.twitter.com/yldYIqlNsn

— Taylor 👽 (@blueboxufo) October 5, 2018

Party rock anthem has the same bpm as god bless texas pic.twitter.com/4DlNJePc69

— Meg (@megdotjpg) October 5, 2018

fuck you by lily allen has the same bpm as party rock anthem pic.twitter.com/CVtUlnzz1x

— kyle @ nyff (@kyle4prezident) October 5, 2018

16 candles video pt 2 pic.twitter.com/EjEciDeGpw

— DCD2 (@DCD2records) October 5, 2018

Party Rock Anthem has the same bpm as God’s Not Dead pic.twitter.com/GvsUagUi6m

— Adler Davidson (@adlerdavidson) October 5, 2018

Ode To Gordon has the same BPM as Party Rock Anthem…
oof pic.twitter.com/9dYPh7lbyo

— TM7 Studios (@tm7_erik) September 29, 2018

so as it turns out, party rock anthem and “rush” by aly & aj have the same bpm pic.twitter.com/anoOLx2lqx

— spooky jones (@joooones) September 23, 2018

Thomas’s Anthem has the same BPM as Party Rock Anthem…
neat. pic.twitter.com/COvBQ48I24

— 🎃Grave_Yard 🎃 (@Shunting_Yard) September 29, 2018

did you guys know party rock anthem and somebody I used to know have the same bpm?? because they do pic.twitter.com/B6DhOhyEDa

— jill-o-lantern ¨̮ (@JillMencke) September 20, 2018

Party Rock Anthem by LMFAO and Medic! from the TF2 Soundtrack have the same BPM.
I’m sorry. pic.twitter.com/dhhXLr7TEF

— Doomsday @ i63 (@kiercookexe) September 19, 2018

turns out party rock anthem also has the same BPM as cantina band pic.twitter.com/QotTPg538Q

— Rebel Scum Finn (@realtraitorfinn) September 19, 2018

So if following current events makes you want to curl up in fetal position and cry, just watch a few Party Rock Anthem memes. It’s well worth it.

Our reader wants to find some software to change the BPMs of all of his songs to be the same. Not only do we think this is a bad idea, but we have no idea if such a thing exists. Have your say below…

One of our readers has a slightly bizarre request. Mike writes: “Does anyone know of software that can batch adjust all of my music to a single BPM? I would like to save my MP3s to all the same BPM to speed up the time it takes for me to ready my next record when I am playing…”

Digital DJ Tips says:

We’re really not sure why you’d want to do this. With the “sync” button, you can adjust the BPM of anything to anything in just a second, but of course, that way you also have the option to play the track at the speed it was intended to be played at should you wish, too.

Remember, any processing like this has the disadvantage of degrading the sound quality of your music, and you gain very little by doing this. We certainly haven’t ever heard of any programs designed to do this, probably because to be honest, doing so really doesn’t make much sense.

So I’m going to throw this over to the readers…

Can you, dear readers, see any instances where this may be a good idea? Have you ever done it for whatever reason? Or would you like to join me in trying to talk Mike out of it? Leave your comments below…

10 Songs That Are Scientifically Proven to Amp Up Your Workout

Maybe you’re one of those people who loves going to the gym. Maybe you’re one of those people who only loves it after the fact, once your workout is over and you can get the heck out of there. No matter your exercise m.o., integrating music into your routine has been proven to increase the efficiency of your workout.

Some people, like myself, can’t work out without music — though others can somehow run for hours to the sound of silence. And even though I thought that those types of people were simply insane, it turns out that this is actually because there are two distinct kinds of work out personalities, as ABC News points out. The first type, associators, turn their attention inward while they are exercising, and focus on their heart rate, breathing, and muscle tension. Dissociators, on the other hand, turn their focus to anything that can distract them from the work that their body is doing, be it with a book, television or music.

If it sounds like you are a dissociator, music might be your best choice for a better workout for many reasons. First, you are distracted by the music so you aren’t focusing on how hard your body is working or the strain and effort associated with that work, allowing you to have a longer work out. Music with high beats per minute, or BPM, will also help you keep a faster pace. Additionally, music with inspirational or motivational messages can keep you positive and reduce perceived exertion during a strenuous work out, encouraging you to push yourself harder.

In fact, Dr. Costas Karageorghis of Brunel University, London, told TIME Magazine that listening to music can result in a more intense workout and improve endurance by up to 15 percent. Karageorghis also shared how to chose the best workout music. Apparently, you should choose a song that builds up to the same BPM as your target heart rate, with the target range between 120-140 BPM. You should also make sure that the songs have a positive or motivational messages and keep your iPod on shuffle so you don’t get bored of your playlists.

Dr. Costas Karageorghis’ song suggestions:

“Eye Of The Tiger” (109 BPM), Surivior

“Don’t Stop Me Now” (154 BPM), Queen

“Beat It” (139 BPM), Michael Jackson

“I Like To Move It” (123 BPM), Reel 2 Real feat. The Mad Stuntman

“Push It” (130 BPM), Salt-N-Pepa

My song suggestions:

“Rock That Body” (125 BPM), Black Eyed Peas

“Turn Around (5,4,3,2,1)” (128 BPM), Flo Rida

“Here It Goes Again” (146 BPM), O.K. Go

“Feel It” (133 BPM), Tiesto

“Pop That” (138), French Montana

You can stream this playlist here on Spotify, and you can find the BPM of any song with this website. Happy calorie burning!

Image: Mike Baird/Flickr

Fitness playlists flow to the beats per minutes

NEW YORK (Reuters) – When fitness instructor Shirley Archer plays Annie Lennox’s song “17 Again” for her indoor cycling class, she urges students to connect with the vitality of their inner 17-year-old legs.

When she teaches yoga she rolls out the harp solos.

Experts say exercising to the proper music can boost your mood, kick your workout up a notch and channel the energy of a younger you.

“Fitness playlists are extremely important,” said Archer, who is also a spokeswoman for the American Council on Exercise. “A number of studies show that music can impact mood, emotions, energy levels, even breathing and heart rates.”

Archer, author of 12 books on fitness and wellness, including “Fitness 9 to 5,” said the research comes from music therapy, sports, surgical recovery and gait training studies for people with neurodegenerative issues.

“Music is powerful because it stimulates different neural pathways in the brain and taps powerfully into our emotions and our memories,” said Archer, who lives in Singer Island, Florida, and Zurich, Switzerland.

Not only can music help people power through workouts, she said, it can distract them from boredom, fatigue and discomfort.

“Think about how people who are middle-aged or older find their dancing feet when they hear tunes that were popular when they were in their teens or early 20s,” she said.

Also a powerful tool for relaxation, music can help to slow and calm heart and breathing rates, reduce stress and evoke feelings of peace and balance.

A good fitness playlist will match the workout objectives, Archer said. An aerobic workout should start out with uplifting music at a tempo of about 130 BPM (beats per minute) and build to around 150 BPM.

“Studies show that this is a moderate aerobic pace for most people,” she said. “Think of the tunes ‘Stayin’ Alive,’ ‘9 to 5’ or Justin Timberlake’s ‘Rock Your Body.’”

Toward the end of the workout, she said, the pace should slow again.

MAXIMUM BENEFIT

Deekron Krikorian, known professionally as Deekron the Fitness DJ, designs and produces fitness playlists for specific workouts based heavily on BPM.

“The typical exerciser listens to music to kill boredom, reduce the perception of pain,” said Krikorian, whose hour-long podcasts, called Motion Traxx, are on iTunes. “The main purpose is to motivate you, but unless you fit the pacing to your workout, you’re not getting the maximum benefit.”

That’s where Krikorian comes in.

“Every episode is set at a different BPM. We tweak it. We’re able to manipulate it. Most people don’t have the tools to do that on their own.”

For most people, a power walk would involve 125-135 musical beats per minute, said Krikorian, who started out making fitness CDs for instructors and consumers. He said 135-145 BPM works for an elliptical workout or an easy jog. Above 150 BPM puts you in the running zone.

Some Motion Traxx podcasts include trainers to coach you through the workout.

The rise of the iPod and iPhone have allowed playlists to become so specific, he said.

“They let us bring music with us,” he said. “Walkmans helped, but the iPod and iPhone have taken things to another level.”

Josh Adler, who teaches spinning at the New York Health & Racquet Club, a chain of fitness centers in New York City and Long Island, creates his own playlist.

Pop divas Rihanna, Lady Gaga and Madonna are among his staples, along with music from the 1980s and 1990s he discovered on the dance floor.

“I want people to recognize a couple of songs,” he said. “So the time goes by more quickly.”

He said remixes are often ideally suited to the high-intensity interval training of his class.

“The first minute is a steady beat, the lyrical hook. Then the music intensifies on the chorus,” he said. “The intervals last 30 to 60 seconds, which is perfectly matched to what your body needs to do.”

Krikorian keeps his podcasts fresh by changing them at least once a month.

“Music can play a really big role in fitness if used the right way,” he said. “It’s a new twist on an old song that gets them really excited.”

Editing by Patricia Reaney; editing by John Wallace

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Workout Music to Run to Run, Walk, Cycle … BPM & Exercise

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To determine the best exercise songs and maximize your performance, match your music to your cadence. In other words, the tempo of the music should fit with your preferred work rate (or steps per minute). Generally the faster the work rate, the faster the tempo of the music (greater beats per minute). Beats per minute (BPM) basically equals steps per minute. The table below gives you approximate ranges of BPM for different exercises and the second table below provides detailed information on BPM, steps per minute and stride length for runners. Check out exercise music to find the songs that go with your cadence/ BPM.

Find the ideal BPM to match your workout

BPM TYPE OF EXERCISE
160+ Running (5 mph or faster) Cycling (80 rpm and above) Jumping rope Cardio dance
140 – 160 Jogging (4.5 to 5 mph) Elliptical Stairclimbing
125 – 140 Brisk walking (3.5 to 4.5 mph) Light elliptical Stairclimbing
105 – 125 Walking (3 to 3.5 mph) Strength training
60 – 115 Pilates Yoga Warm-up Cooldown Stretching

BPM AND MUSIC FOR RUNNERS

The table below gives you an idea of how running speed/ stride length correlate with BPM. This will help you work out the best running music to get the most out of your running session and improve your running ability and performances. However, the tables below and above are estimates only and you’ll only know how good a song is once you get started. Also, BPM is just one factor to consider when choosing the best music for exercise.

BPM Time per km Steps per km Stride length Time per 100m (sec) Steps per
100m
150 10 1500 0.67 60 147 – 150
153 9 1380 0.73 54 135 – 138
156 8 1350 0.80 48 122 – 137
160 7 1120 0.89 42 109 – 112
163 6 980 1.02 36 98 – 102
166 5 830 1.20 30 83 – 86
171 4 680 1.47 24 64 – 68
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What Music Is Best For Exercise? 6 Scientific Facts To Remember When You’re Making A Playlist

When news broke last January that scientists had put together the “ultimate playlist” for exercise, incredulity reigned. Could specific music really make us push ourselves harder on the treadmill? What about non-English speakers, or people who hate Kesha, Lady Gaga, and Jessie J (all of whom were featured)?

The study of exercise performance and its relation to music is actually over a century old — the first real study was held in 1911 — but accumulated evidence is refining our understanding of how radio hits and repeated beats really do affect our bodies when they’re pushed to their limits. And it’s not as simple as chucking on your favorite tunes.

In the age of personal, portable music machines, you’ll rarely see a jogger without headphones. The idea of tailoring music to specific exercise activity, however, is becoming a seriously interesting part of science — because, even if we think our bodies are nice, neat things unaffected by the world around them, it seems that music really can boost our physiological performance when it comes to pushing ourselves. The key questions here are: Why? And what parts of music are responsible?

The next time you’re putting together a workout playlist, know that it may not pay off to just grab whatever you’re loving from your music library. Learn the science instead — and you’ll be kicking some serious butt.

1. Beats-Per-Minute Boost The Body’s Rhythm

The basic discovery underneath musical motivation is that our bodies seem to want to respond to the music we hear. Even if we’re not jogging or moving in exact time to the beat, the idea of repeated, interesting, rapid rhythms inspires our efforts.

Good workout music, according to Scientific American, utilizes a phenomenon called rhythm response, which is a measure of how much a song makes us want to move to its tempo and beat. The body, it seems, likes to move its respiration rate and heart beat roughly in line with the high-tempo music it’s exposed to.

The science of finding the perfect beats-per-minute ratio is a pretty difficult one, though. Some scientists, including those who put together the “ultimate playlist,” think that working with an exercising human’s average strides per minute (150 to 190, depending on your pace and fitness) gives the best measure. Halving that number gives you 75 to 65 beats per minute (bpm), so you do two strides per beat.

For reference, a lot of hip hop and rap songs fit into that bpm range. Others scientists, however, advocate a much faster rate: 120 bpm, which is apparently a rhythmic range we gravitate towards pretty naturally when we click our fingers or tap our feet.

The handy site SongBPM will tell you exactly how many bpm a song has.

2. Music Should Vary With Your Type Of Exercise

Getting the right timing on your music and matching it to your exercise regime is actually pretty critical to your performance. The key thing to know before you put together a playlist is what kind of exercise you’re doing that day. Sprint intervals? Strength training? Yoga? Swimming? Whatever it is, you need to match your playlist tempo to your expected cadence, or how fast your heart’s going to be beating during that workout — and to what it expects of you. The more repetitive your workout, the better you’ll respond to really repetitive beats, for example.

Pop music, apparently, is best for warm-ups and warm-downs, while dance music, with its higher bpms, is more suitable to high-intensity workouts like strength training than it is for running, which requires a slower set of movements. And anything with an uneven tempo needs to be avoided, because your body will get confused.

3. Music With Regular Beats Reduces Energy Waste

If you want to exercise efficiently, a well-chosen playlist may be the key to tricking your body into making sure it doesn’t waste anything. A study of cyclists showed that those who cycled in time to music actually used seven percent less oxygen than those who went with their own rhythm — and it’s a discovery found across the board. Your motivational music actually makes your body work both harder and more efficiently.

However, if you’re absolutely sprinting, cycling at a breakneck pace or trying to reach 100 percent effort in basically any exercise capacity, music will probably not improve your efficiency all that much. Once you’re at that level, the music won’t affect your heart rate or oxygen use — which is probably good, as incredibly high-intensity exercise series need to be done with the minimum of distractions to avoid injuries. Not the best time to be pumping Rihanna.

4. 145 Beats Per Minute May Be The Highest You Can Go

It may be tempting to think that the sky’s the limit as far as beats per minute and their impact on your exercise potential. However, there are limits. One, as we’ve noted, is how hard you’re pushing yourself — but another, it seems, may be the bpm measure itself.

Scientific American’s collection of studies on the subject indicates that there’s what’s called a “ceiling effect” once you hit 145 bpm. Any songs faster than that aren’t going to make you work any faster or any harder; that’s your body’s natural inspirational threshold. So incredibly mind-blurringly fast EDM music probably ain’t your friend.

5. Distraction Is A Seriously Important Factor

Don’t just put on music with the right bpm ratio and expect yourself to break records. One of the real psychological factors in an effective workout playlist is its ability to keep you motivated and also distract you from your pain. The British Association Of Sports And Exercise Sciences calls the best exercise music a combination of “encouragement, affective enhancement, distraction, and stimulation.” In other words, mindless pop may not be the answer if you don’t find yourself captivated by its message or distracted by its beat.

This is a good argument for changing workout music regularly — to maintain its ability to distract you. Having a cycle of known songs that you regularly rotate may be a better strategy for maintaining interest and distraction than the same old playlist every time. The science of the bpm motivational push, however, means that podcasts and audiobooks just may not give you the same edge — unless they’re incredibly motivating and positive, in which case they may be able to give you a kind of mood enhancement that raises your pain threshold.

6. Men & Women Have Different Motivational Music

The same team that put together the “ultimate playlist” also discovered something interesting: the most popular exercise music seems to differ pretty radically between the sexes. Their research was drawn from Spotify’s millions of public exercise playlists compiled by users, and it looks like, while women appreciate female pop singers like Lady Gaga, men are more drawn to classic rock like Eye Of The Tiger.

The reasoning behind this is unclear, but we can make some good guesses. Music that’s more outwardly girl-power, explicitly marketed towards a female market, will likely have more of an emotionally positive pull among women who exercise. After all, music needs to distract and elevate you as well as push you along. Personally tailored workout playlists need to cater to taste as much as tempo to work, but when they do, they’re medical wonders: one study showed that, when cardiac patients were given personalized playlists to help them do exercise therapy, they were 70 percent more likely to stick with it.

So start getting scientific about your workout music, and you’ll see improvements in ways you may not even have anticipated. And no, a recording of your trainer yelling at you is not going to get you there — unless it’s set to a banging beat.

DestinysChildVEVO on YouTube

Images: Pexels; Giphy

Songs with 132 bpm

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