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This year’s Super Bowl halftime show in Atlanta will be headlined by Maroon 5, with appearances by rapper Travis Scott and Big Boi.

The group will perform at the 53rd edition of the Super Bowl halftime show, joining performers back to 1967 in entertaining one of the largest audiences in the world.

Super Bowl halftime performances started as smaller productions, but after Michael Jackson headlined the 1993 show, the league made a more conscious effort to secure big name performers during the longer-than-normal halftime break.

Performances were crafted around a theme until 2002, but after U2’s tribute to the lives lost in the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, themes were dropped from the halftime performances. Justin Timberlake, Lady Gaga, Coldplay and Beyonce highlight the show’s most recent headliners.

Here is a complete list of past Super Bowl performers:

2018: Justin Timberlake and the Tennessee Kids along with the University of Minnesota marching band

2017: Lady Gaga

2016: Coldplay, Beyonce, Bruno Mars, Mark Ronson and the University of California marching band

2015: Katy Perry, Lenny Kravitz, Missy Elliott and the Arizona State University marching band

2014: Bruno Mars, Red Hot Chili Peppers

2013: Beyonce and Destiny’s Child

2012: Madonna, LMFAO, Nicki Minaj, M.I.A. and Cee Lo Green

2011: The Black Eyed Peas, Usher, Slash

2010: The Who

2009: Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

2008: Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers

2007: Prince and the Florida A&M marching band

2006: The Rolling Stones

2005: Paul McCartney

2004: Janet Jackson, Kid Rock, P. Diddy, Jessica Simpson, Nelly and Justin Timberlake along with the University of Houston and Texas Southern University marching bands

2003: Shania Twain, No Doubt and Sting

2002: “Tribute to Sept. 11” performed by U2

2001: “The Kings of Rock and Pop” performed by Aerosmith, ‘N’Sync, Britney Spears, Mary J. Blige and Nelly

2000: “A Tapestry of Nations” with Phil Collins, Christina Aguilera, Enrique Iglesias and Toni Braxton

1999: “Celebration of Soul, Salsa and Swing” performed by Stevie Wonder, Gloria Estefan and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

1998: “A Salute to Motown’s 40th Anniversary” with Boyz II Men, Smokey Robinson, The Temptations, Queen Latifah, Martha Reeves and the Grambling State University marching band

1997: “Blues Brothers Bash” with the Blues Brothers (Dan Akroyd, John Goodman and James Belushi), James Brown and ZZ Top

1996: “Take Me Higher: A Celebration of 30 Years of the Super Bowl” performed by Diana Ross

1995: “Indiana Jones and the Temple of the Forbidden Eye” with Tony Bennett, Patti LaBelle, Arturo Sandoval, the Miami Sound Machine

1994: “Rockin’ Country Sunday” with Clint Black, Tanya Tucker, Travis Tritt, Wynonna and Naomi Judd

1993: “Heal the World” performed by Michael Jackson

1992: “Winter Magic” with Gloria Estefan, the University of Minnesota marching band

1991: “A Small World Tribute to 25 Years of the Super Bowl” performed by New Kids on the Block

1990: “Salute to New Orleans and 40th Anniversary of Peanuts,” with trumpeter Pete Fountain, Doug Kershaw, Irma Thomas and the Nicholls State University and Southern University marching bands

1989: “Be Bop Bamboozled” with Elvis Presto

1988: “Something Grand” with 88 grand pianos, the Rockettes, Chubby Checker and the combined San Diego State and USC marching bands

1987: “Salute to Hollywood’s 100th Anniversary” with George Burns, Mickey Rooney, Grambling State University and USC marching bands

1986: “Beat of the Future” with Up with People

1985: “A World of Children’s Dreams” with Tops In Blue

1984: “Salute to the Superstars of the Silver Screen” with the University of Florida and Florida State marching bands

1983: “KaleidoSUPERscope” with the Los Angeles Super Drill Team

1982: “A Salute to the 60s and Motown” with Up with People

1981: “A Mardi Gras Festival” with Helen O’Connell and the Southern University marching band

1980: “A Salute to the Big Band Era” with Up with People and the Grambling State University marching band

1979: “Salute to the Caribbean” with Ken Hamilton and various Caribbean bands

1978: “From Paris to the Paris of America” with Tyler Apache Belles and Apache Band Pete Fountain and Al Hirt

1977: “It’s a Small World” with the Los Angeles Unified All-City band

1976: “200 Years and Just a Baby: A Tribute to America’s Bicentennial” with Up with People

1975: “Tribute to Duke Ellington” with Mercer Ellington and the Grambling State University band

1974: “A Musical America” with the University of Texas band

1973: “Happiness Is” with the University of Michigan marching band, Woody Herman and Andy Williams

1972: “Salute to Louis Armstrong” with Ella Fitzgerald, Carol Channing, Al Hirt and U.S. Marine Corps Drill Team

1971: Southern Missouri State marching band

1970: “Tribute to Mardi Gras” with Marguerite Piazza, Doc Severinsen, Al Hirt, Lionel Hampton and the Southern University Marching Band

1969: “America Thanks” with the Florida A&M University band and Miami area high school bands

1968: Grambling State University band

1967: The Three Stooges, University of Arizona and Grambling State University marching bands

25 Super Bowl halftime shows ranked from truly terrible to totally transcendent

AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy, file

The Super Bowl halftime show hasn’t always been a concert featuring the world’s biggest pop stars. In the early years, the ‘60s and some of the ‘70s, the shows were mainly marching bands and Al Hirt. In the ‘70s and ‘80s, the shows were thematic, like “A Salute to the Big Band Era” and “Salute to Caribbean.”

There were groups and individuals who showed up sometimes on the shows — Up With People and Al Hirt feature heavily. But it was the ‘90s when the Super Bowl halftime show as we know it now really caught on.

These shows feature big names of the day, or else nostalgic favorites. These short national concerts, in the middle of the culmination of a season of men bashing their skulls into each other, are perfect annual snapshots of our culture. And, in a surprise twist for me, a non-football watcher, a lot of them are really fun to watch!

So, here are 25 of them, ranked from very bad to very, very good.

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25: Justin Timberlake, 2018

Somehow, after decades of over-the-top hopeful dance numbers about world peace, gender equality, American pride and racial unity, Justin Timberlake in 2018 decided to go with the theme “Justin Timberlake” in 2018.

First of all, Justin didn’t deserve a second chance at this. If he had even an ounce of self-awareness, he have featured Janet Jackson as a guest and faded into the background. Instead, he played some very bad music from his very bad newest album, mixed in with his hits, while wearing what can only be described as dirty pants.

Justin did not have a single meaningful guest. Instead, he went with a lot of back-up dancers dressed like they were in a middle school production of “Godspell.”

He also went with a Prince tribute that made me say, out loud, “Take his name out of your mouth, Justin.”

Possibly worst of all, though, this show was boring. Let’s come together as a country and demand no more Justin Timberlake Super Bowl halftime shows, OK?

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24: N’Sync, Britney Spears and Aerosmith, 2001

Come with me on a journey into pre-9/11 America. The Super Bowl halftime show was a chance for all of America to see hot groups like N’Sync and Aerosmith share a stage with Britney Spears.

In what is probably his top Super Bowl halftime show moment, Justin Timberlake shot fireworks out of his gloves.

Britney Spears was painfully skinny, and when she sang with Justin Timberlake, I wished I could jump through time and tell her to drop him now before he writes mean songs about her.

Mary J. Blige was completely under-utilized here and was basically a back-up singer, which was embarrassing.

Though the stage is full, there was far too much Timberlake to make this a good halftime show.

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23: Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake, 2004

If only Janet Jackson had said no to sharing a bill with Jessica Simpson, Kid Rock and Justin Timberlake.

Because when she came on stage, as usual, she killed it during her 2004 halftime show appearance. She sang (OK, probably lip-syncs) the hits and danced like the Jackson she is. There was a drumline. A song about fighting all the world’s problems.

And then, darkness descended … one Justin Timberlake, come to wreck her career.

Justin in his baggy pants ground all over his superior Janet, who yes, was obviously the choreographer. Do you know what else was likely choreographed? When, at the end of the show, he sang, “Gonna have you naked by the end of this song,” and ripped off what appeared to be the breakaway bit on Janet’s bodice.

If you go to the slowed down screenshots, you can see that Janet’s nipple is covered with a fancy pastie. This was probably planned. So why did America freak out? Why didn’t Justin stand up for Janet as her career crumbled over one breast?

It was dumb, and it was Justin’s fault, and I, for one, will never forgive him.

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22: The Rolling Stones, 2006

One thing about aging rockers putting on a concert for the halftime show is that there is never the spectacle you get from pop stars like Lady Gaga or Beyoncé or Madonna. Their shows have to live or die on the merits of their sound and songs. Mick Jagger’s voice isn’t what it used to be, if it ever was something you’d want to listen to.

The other issue here is, you have to play the hits. Every song should have sing-along-ability. The Rolling Stones honestly may not have enough well-known hits to even make this possible.

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21: Black Eyed Peas, 2011

The Black Eyed Peas are the kind of band that was made for the Super Bowl halftime show. Their 2011 show may have struggled with some sound but also, it was 2011, so there were enough LED lights to at least begin to distract from the problems.

Things really got going in this show when Slash started playing and Fergie went into a mediocre but definitely live rendition of “Sweet Child of Mine.”

The Black Eyed Peas did two other smart things: They incorporated a marching band, a classic halftime show move that can’t fail, and they had Usher fly in from the sky. It would have helped if Usher had added something, anything, else to the show. But hey, at least they didn’t have Justin Timberlake on as a guest.

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20: Shania Twain, No Doubt, Sting, 2003

The strange thing about the 2003 Super Bowl halftime show is that it featured two anthems about early 2000s womanhood: “I’m Just a Girl” and “Man, I Feel Like a Woman.” But they appeared in a time when singing about oppression, for No Doubt, came with sexy baby voice and very few clothes. For Shania, singing about the female experience included a line about not being politically correct.

Sting wasn’t bad here, until he weirdly leered at Gwen Stefani, but thematically, this show was all over the place and lacked drama of any kind.

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19: New Kids on the Block, 1991

New Kids on the Block were dominating American culture in 1991, so this show, a Disney-themed NKOTB extravaganza, with massive blow-up Disney characters, a castle and a bunch of charming kids that don’t look to be professionals, must have had its finger on the pulse. Now, 28 years later, the show feels almost quaint. Imagine singing “It’s a Small World” with a straight face in 2019? But back then, bucket hats were just picking up steam, and anything was possible.

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18: Katy Perry, 2015

What Katy Perry lacks in singing talent, she makes up in drama. Here’s the show where she came in on a giant moving tiger and then, somehow, Lenny Kravitz was singing “I Kissed a Girl.” Plus, this halftime show brought us Left Shark.

I’ll admit it, I’m a sucker for a woman in her 30s singing about being “your teenage dream tonight.”

Katie Perry may not have a great voice, but she was smart enough to bring Missy Elliot on stage. She knows when to lean into spectacle, and that the Super Bowl halftime show is not when you try out new material. She ran through her hits and flew around on a shooting star, which seemed chintzy and lacked subtlety when compared to other stunts, but was also pretty entertaining.

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17: The Who, 2011

Sometimes a Super Bowl halftime show is just a vehicle for a concert experience in your living room that you will never have in the real world.

Most of us will never get to watch The Who play “Baba O’Reilly” live, but imagine what it was like in 2010, when a bunch of old guys blew the roof off of a song about teenage wasteland, and everyone’s conservative uncle was transported to a time when they were smoking pot at the playground. Yes, their voices weren’t what they once were, but like, is yours?

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16: Paul McCartney, 2005

The naughts were another era tinged with nostalgia. Which begs the question, has American culture ever lived in the present moment? Paul McCartney, as usual, ran through his greatest hits and those of the band that brought him fame.

While I don’t mind McCartney and think he does put on a good show, I still think he should always have Ringo on stage with him. Also, Paul, would it kill you to hire a female musician?

Still, I would sing along to all these songs with zero reservations. And there were plenty of fireworks, which added back some drama missing without dance numbers.

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15: Bruno Mars, 2014

Bruno Mars has energy, he has pizzaz, and he makes you smile, gosh darn it! Here’s a guy not afraid to put on a show during which he will sing, he will dance, and he will even do splits.

At one point, Bruno brought on the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and the show feels like something hatched up at an L.A. party in a fancy house in the hills where you wouldn’t even be let up the driveway. What do these bands have in common? Who cares! Anthony Kiedis doesn’t have a shirt on!

The Super Bowl halftime show should really have at least one schmaltzy moment that makes you feel like the world isn’t burning to the ground in front of your eyes, and Bruno came through with service members dedicating a song to their loved ones. A solid performance.

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14: Up With People, 1982

In 1982, America failed to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution. But that doesn’t mean Americans weren’t a little bit high on gender and racial equality, and probably marijuana. That year’s Super Bowl halftime show perfectly encapsulates a culture striving for something like equity through massive dance numbers, pop music and a stage full of men in vests playing guitar.

The high point of this show was when the 1980s crowd gets nostalgic about 1960s folk music.

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13: U2, 2002

After 9/11, for a while, you couldn’t have an event or a show or anything without acknowledging that horrible day. U2, even though OK, they aren’t American, were a perfect band to deal with this during the Super Bowl halftime show. They were already dramatic in a way that draws you into their orbit of extreme emotion. Looking back, I bet as those names scrolled through on the giant screen, American living rooms were filled with teary-eyed people.

America needed that catharsis over and over again. Maybe we still need it.

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12: Clint Black, Tanya Tucker, Travis Tritt, The Judds, 1994

If you can’t find joy in this extreme country music lineup, with a whole field full of line dancers, then you probably weren’t alive in 1994. So many vests, so much fringe. It was a different time. At the end of this show, everyone got on stage and sang “Love Can Build a Bridge,” and that everyone included Stevie Wonder and Naomi Judd.

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11: Lady Gaga, 2017

Lady Gaga literally rappelled into her show, after doing a medley of America songs. Love her or hate her, she is definitely entertaining. Her outfits, her voice, her songs about getting too drunk at the club. It’s not hard to watch her with some interest.

She ended the show by jumping off the risers, catching a football in midair. This is halftime, America.

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10: Boyz II Men, Smokey Robinson, Martha Reeves, The Temptations, Queen Latifah, 1998

The late ‘90s were another American era full of nostalgia, and this “Tribute to Motown” show was the perfect mix of retro music and ‘90s boys in baggy pants and girls in crop tops dancing in unison.

The most perfect late ‘90s moment in this show came when Queen Latifah sang her cover of “Heard It Through the Grapevine,” which is actually called “Paper.” What a time to be alive.

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9: Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band, 2009

What’s more American than Bruce Springsteen demanding you put the chicken fingers down so he can sing about New Jersey for 12 minutes?

Bruce Springsteen is always having the best time when he performs and the thing is, we all have the best time listening. He doesn’t do the spectacle, but almost everyone can sing along to every one of his songs.

This halftime show was essentially a Springsteen concert for everyone, and that’s a good thing.

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8: Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, 2008

In terms of 12-minute concerts for the country, Tom Petty in his full beard stage put on a great one. Tom Petty was a national treasure, and he died way too soon, so, as much as I think football should be outlawed unless they can deal with their brain injury problem, I am grateful to Super Bowl for giving us another opportunity to see this great band have the time of their lives playing the songs that are absolutely part of the fabric of our country.

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7: Gloria Estefan, Stevie Wonder and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, 1999

Sometimes the Super Bowl halftime show actually manages to tap into the zeitgeist, and what was more zeitgeisty in 1999 than ska and swing dancing? That’s where this show started but not where it stopped, We also got a medley of Stevie Wonder hits, and an extreme tap dance from Savion Glover, which Stevie joined in.

As if that wasn’t enough, Gloria Estefan came out singing in Spanish with a cadre of excellent dancers.

This was one of those epic shows that reflected America in 1999, when money was flowing and we weren’t in one single war. We didn’t know 9/11 was coming, or “weapons of mass destruction” or a resurgence of Nazis. You could really have fun in 1999. Give it a few years, and the vibe will be a lot less joyful. But that year … it was a heady time.

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6: Diana Ross, 1996

This Diana Ross halftime show was a real extravaganza. It had dancers, children holding hands, costume changes, fireworks, a gospel choir and so many hits.

Everyone here was having the time of their lives, including the audience and probably the at-home audience too.

When Diana descended from her pedestal wearing a skintight plum-colored jumpsuit and started singing “I Will Survive,” even as the wind whipped her hair in front of her face, well, this was the America I, for one, wanted to live in.

A helicopter landed on the field. No one cared about peak oil or climate change, and Diana was escorted onto the helicopter and flew off, hanging out the side of the helicopter. Take that, Justin Timberlake.

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5: Coldplay, Bruno Mars, Beyoncé, 2016

It was a smart move by the Super Bowl halftime show producers to bring these three together for the Super Bowl’s 50th anniversary, even though Beyoncé clearly should have headlined and not Chris Martin.

Still, Mr. Coldplay is infectious, and the graphics on the stage and the umbrella dancers are charming, and Bruno Mars is exactly the kind of cotton candy singalong music you want in a Super Bowl halftime show. Plus it’s very entertaining to watch him dance.

But it’s Beyoncé, who marches out and brings the whole thing down with “Formation.” Somehow, the No. 1 American in America created a musical number during the most mainstream event possible that was about oppression and racial justice and was beautiful and catchy too.

For the Super Bowl’s history of pop singers trying to bring the people messages of hope and equality and world peace, this message about reality was revolutionary.

Of course, the show wasn’t all a reminder of our divided, racist nation. When the three stars came together to sing, you could almost believe football would unite the world instead of tearing us apart.

The show ended with the crowd spelling “Believe in love.” Those were the days, huh?

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4: Michael Jackson, 1993

This was prime Michael Jackson — he used magic to appear on stage and then stared down the audience for a crazy long time, building excitement for whatever was coming next.

What was coming next was exactly what you wanted from Michael: dancing, so much dancing, a medley of the hits, removal of clothing and pyrotechnics that might cause the viewer a bit of panic.

One thing about Michael was that when he wanted to get schmaltzy, he went all in. Here he articulated his message about “remaking the planet into a haven of joy,” which was both vague and kind of religious, but I bet you felt feelings when he finished his set surrounded by children swaying to “Heal the World.” Feelings beyond “Hmm, are we still allowed to like Michael Jackson?” I mean.

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3: Madonna, 2012

At one point, Madonna climbed on one of LMFAO’s shoulders. What’s not to love?

One of Madonna’s talents is finding the most amazing backup dancers. The whole spectacle here is worth watching over and over again, whenever you are feeling sad. And then, it ended with a life-affirming rendition of “Like a Prayer” and the words “World Peace.” Football! Super Bowl! World peace!

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2: Beyoncé, 2013

In 2013, Beyoncé was on top of her game, where she remains, honestly, and production values were turned up to 11. At one point, there was a guitar with fireworks shooting out of it. At another point, she was dancing with herself replicated behind her. Oh, and she reunited Destiny’s Child.

After watching a lot of halftime shows, and since Prince is dead, I think the only conclusion a reasonable person can draw is Beyoncé should do all Super Bowl halftime shows. In fact, cancel the football game, and let’s have a national Beyoncé Appreciation Day, where she throws a concert and it is aired live on every TV station simultaneously all day.

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1: Prince, 2007

At this point, everyone has seen Prince sing “Purple Rain” in the rain. Apparently, in the 40 previous years of the Super Bowl, it never rained. But maybe Prince summoned the water from the sky, who knows? It doesn’t matter if it was divine intervention or just the whims of the weather, the whole show was iconic: his stage in the shape of a symbol, the two dancers spinning around him, “All Along the Watchtower,” his classic Prince smirk.

Prince didn’t need to come in on a monster lion or drop in from the sky. Prince was the monster lion. He was an angel, dropped from the sky.

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— Lizzy Acker

503-221-8052
[email protected], @lizzzyacker

Visit subscription.oregonlive.com/newsletters to get Oregonian/OregonLive journalism delivered to your email inbox.

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The Cincinnati Bengals are going to draft LSU quarterback Joe Burrow with the first overall pick in April’s 2020 NFL Draft. There’s no debate about that. Instead, the drama surrounding Cincinnati’s quarterback situation is about what will happen to the team’s incumbent starter, Andy Dalton.

The veteran of nine seasons and 133 starts has one year remaining on his contract and won’t have much say (more or less) in where he’s playing next fall. It’s just as possible Cincinnati will hold onto him as a veteran mentor for Burrow as it is they’ll trade him to a quarterback-needy team, and according to former Bengals quarterback and current media personality Boomer Esiason, the perfect trade partner is the Bears.

“The thing going for the Bengals is they can trade him to a team like Chicago,” Esiason told Geoff Hobson of Bengals.com. “I see that as the perfect fit for Andy Dalton. Maybe not as the starter, but as a (Ryan) Tannehill and push the guy they hope can be the starter, but eventually if it works out for him he would have an opportunity to take that job and earn that job and have a No. 1 defense. But it’s a very difficult division. Unless Andy wants to go somewhere else.”

Dalton is a popular name mentioned whenever the Bears’ offseason quarterback search is mentioned. It doesn’t hurt that their new offensive coordinator, Bill Lazor, served as Dalton’s QB coach and offensive coordinator from 2016-18, leading to even more speculation that it’s a perfect marriage.

RELATED: 2020 NFL Mock Draft – Which QBs go in Round 1?

Dalton would be the ideal veteran for the Bears to add. He doesn’t have a resume overflowing with success; sure, he’s won more than he’s lost (70-61-2 as a starter), but he doesn’t have a Super Bowl ring or a league-MVP on his ledger. He wouldn’t appear as an immediate threat to Mitch Trubisky, but in reality, he could end Trubisky’s tenure as the Bears’ starter.

Dalton is a pro’s pro. He can make all the throws, he’s a reliable and consistent passer, and with a great defense and good enough skill players around him, there’s no reason to think he wouldn’t be an upgrade from what the Bears received at the quarterback position in 2019.

Dalton’s contract calls for a $17.7 million salary in 2020, which by current league standards is a bargain for a starting quarterback. The Bengals can release him with no cap penalty, but if Dalton ranks atop the Bears’ quarterback wish list, it’d be wiser to trade for him than get into a bidding war on the open market. It’s highly unlikely a trade will cost them more than a Day-3 pick.

Familiarity with the coaching staff, a history of success and a skill set proven to be productive in the NFL are major boxes that Dalton would check for the Bears. It just makes too much sense.

to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of the Bears.

The Maroon 5 Super Bowl Halftime Song List Contains The Band’s Signature Hits

Maroon 5 headlined the Pepsi Super Bowl halftime show during the big game on Sunday, Feb. 3, and the Maroon 5 Super Bowl halftime song list was filled with so many of their biggest hits. Travis Scott and Big Boi also performed their hit songs as part of the halftime show.

The NFL officially confirmed Maroon 5 as the Pepsi Super Bowl halftime show headliners, along with Travis Scott and Big Boi. In a Feb. 1 interview with Entertainment Tonight, Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine said that he and the band prepared for the performance by reviewing halftime shows from past years.

“I have watched every single halftime show there has been just to get inspiration and to see what people did, and I remember a lot of them, but to go back and revisit some of my favorite ones — especially the rock bands and the Prince one, which is legendary, and Tom Petty and the Stones and Springsteen, all the bands we feel we are most connected with musically — and it has been amazing,” he said.

These are the songs performed by Maroon 5 at the halftime show:

“Harder To Breathe”

Maroon5VEVO on YouTube

You know this hit as one of Maroon 5’s signature songs.

“This Love”

Maroon5VEVO on YouTube

Talk about a throwback. This Maroon 5 tune is from the band’s 2002 album Songs About Jane.

“Girls Like You”

Maroon5VEVO on YouTube

Maroon 5 frontman was joined by a gospel choir for the Super Bowl rendition of the band’s latest hit song.

“The Way You Move”

OutkastVEVO on YouTube

Levine joined Big Boi on the Super Bowl halftime stage in singing this 2003 hit tune by Outkast.

“She Will Be Loved”

Maroon5VEVO on YouTube

Levine crooned this 2002 Maroon 5 ballad during the Pepsi Super Bowl halftime show.

“Sugar”

Maroon5VEVO on YouTube

The band performed this catchy 2014 track as lavender orbs bounced around the Super Bowl halftime crowd.

“Moves Like Jagger”

Maroon5VEVO on YouTube

Levine removed his shirt as he belted out this smash hit track from 2010.

Maroon 5’s Pepsi Super Bowl halftime show song list definitely seemed like a greatest hits compilation of the band’s most popular tracks.

The Cincinnati Bengals are going to draft LSU quarterback Joe Burrow with the first overall pick in April’s 2020 NFL Draft. There’s no debate about that. Instead, the drama surrounding Cincinnati’s quarterback situation is about what will happen to the team’s incumbent starter, Andy Dalton.

The veteran of nine seasons and 133 starts has one year remaining on his contract and won’t have much say (more or less) in where he’s playing next fall. It’s just as possible Cincinnati will hold onto him as a veteran mentor for Burrow as it is they’ll trade him to a quarterback-needy team, and according to former Bengals quarterback and current media personality Boomer Esiason, the perfect trade partner is the Bears.

“The thing going for the Bengals is they can trade him to a team like Chicago,” Esiason told Geoff Hobson of Bengals.com. “I see that as the perfect fit for Andy Dalton. Maybe not as the starter, but as a (Ryan) Tannehill and push the guy they hope can be the starter, but eventually if it works out for him he would have an opportunity to take that job and earn that job and have a No. 1 defense. But it’s a very difficult division. Unless Andy wants to go somewhere else.”

Dalton is a popular name mentioned whenever the Bears’ offseason quarterback search is mentioned. It doesn’t hurt that their new offensive coordinator, Bill Lazor, served as Dalton’s QB coach and offensive coordinator from 2016-18, leading to even more speculation that it’s a perfect marriage.

RELATED: 2020 NFL Mock Draft – Which QBs go in Round 1?

Dalton would be the ideal veteran for the Bears to add. He doesn’t have a resume overflowing with success; sure, he’s won more than he’s lost (70-61-2 as a starter), but he doesn’t have a Super Bowl ring or a league-MVP on his ledger. He wouldn’t appear as an immediate threat to Mitch Trubisky, but in reality, he could end Trubisky’s tenure as the Bears’ starter.

Dalton is a pro’s pro. He can make all the throws, he’s a reliable and consistent passer, and with a great defense and good enough skill players around him, there’s no reason to think he wouldn’t be an upgrade from what the Bears received at the quarterback position in 2019.

Dalton’s contract calls for a $17.7 million salary in 2020, which by current league standards is a bargain for a starting quarterback. The Bengals can release him with no cap penalty, but if Dalton ranks atop the Bears’ quarterback wish list, it’d be wiser to trade for him than get into a bidding war on the open market. It’s highly unlikely a trade will cost them more than a Day-3 pick.

Familiarity with the coaching staff, a history of success and a skill set proven to be productive in the NFL are major boxes that Dalton would check for the Bears. It just makes too much sense.

to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of the Bears.

Justice for “Whenever, Wherever”

Shakira and Jennifer Lopez are this year’s Super Bowl Halftime Show’s headliners. We don’t know what to expect, but Shakira might’ve clued us in on her setlist.

Shak posted a photo on Instagram which included a board stacked with imagery from what appears to her forthcoming Super Bowl performance (she deleted the post already). Fans put on their detective hats and narrowed down a likely setlist based off of the mood board. If we are to believe the buzz, Shakira will perform the following:

  • “Me Gusta” (I Like It)
  • “Chantaje”
  • “Hips Don’t Lie”
  • “Waka Waka”

UPDATE: Fans believe they’ve figured things out, and this is what the setlist could actually look like:

  • Whenever, Wherever
  • Chantaje
  • She Wolf
  • Hips Don’t Lie
  • Ojos Asi (belly dancing)
  • Empire

The Super Bowl Halftime Show airs live on CBS this Sunday (Feb 2).

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#Shakira leaks her #SuperBowl #halftimeshow
Fans put on their detective hats and narrowed down a likely setlist based off of the mood board:
“Me Gusta” (I Like It)
“Chantaje”
“Hips Don’t Lie”
“Waka Waka”
No “Whenever, Wherever,” “She Wolf” or “La Tortura” sorry gheys pic.twitter.com/Zp01nab1Vn

—#STUPIDLOVE FEB 7th ❁ (@MONSTER4LlFE) January 28, 2020

You guys are so judgemental! She used “she wolf ” ,”hdl” and “empire” in her stories which means she probably performs them and those belly dance belts definitely gives some whenever wherever vibes , stop putting her down , show your support and encourage her for the show!!

— Shakira (@Shakira_fact) January 28, 2020

The Dream Setlist for Jennifer Lopez & Shakira’s Super Bowl Halftime Show

We are less than a week away from watching Jennifer Lopez and Shakira perform at the Super Bowl LIV halftime show, taking place at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami on Sunday. Both artists made the surprise announcement in late September 2019 by posting the news on social media, where they’ve also been sharing photos and videos while rehearsing.

While we wait to see the show, Billboard put together a list of songs we’re hoping Jennifer Lopez and Shakira include in their 2020 Super Bowl halftime performance.

Check it out below.

Opening: Jennifer Lopez

Medley: “Let’s Get Loud” / “On the Floor”

What better way to start the halftime show at the Super Bowl than with two of Jennifer Lopez’s most high-energy hits? These tracks will definitely get fans on their feet. Also, we’re hoping Pitbull shows up.

Shakira’s entrance

Medley: “Can’t Remember to “Forget You” / “Dare” / ”Beautiful Liar”

Jennifer Lopez’s “On the Floor” would bring the perfect beat to lead into Shak’s entrance with “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Shakira could also wow with a medley that includes “Dare” and “Beautiful Liar.”

Spanish-language songs:

“Crazy” / “La Tortura” / “Dinero” / “El Anillo”

Why not include songs in Spanish? In her setlist, the Colombian singer could include “Loca” and “La Tortura,” while Lopez might go for “Dinero” and “El Anillo.” These four songs would serve as a wonderful representation of the artists’ Latin heritage.

Big Finale

“Whenever, Wherever” / “Live It Up”

Inevitably, Lopez and Shakira will join forces to sing each other’s songs. For the big finale, “Whenever, Wherever” and “Live It Up” would make for one of the biggest moments in Latin music.

Listen to the dream playlist below.

The Super Bowl halftime show is the grandest stage for any performer. Not only do they have tens of thousands of people watching their every move in person, but they are also being broadcast to a worldwide audience of more than 100 million people.

Over the years, we have seen great and not-so-great performances on this stage, but we should be in for the former this year as Shakira and Jennifer Lopez will be sharing the spotlight for Super Bowl 54. You can bet on which songs each artist will perform and what we will see in Miami on Super Bowl Sunday.

MORE: Get the latest Super Bowl 54 odds & betting trends at Sports Insider

Super Bowl prop bets 2020: Halftime show

Will either Jennifer Lopez or Shakira first address the audience in Spanish?

  • Yes +150
  • No -200

This is an interesting prop. Both artists are bilingual, and both Lopez and Shakira are certain to speak Spanish at some point during their sets since they are in Miami. However, it seems likely that both artists will first address the crowd in English before switching to Spanish at some point. Since the Super Bowl is predominately attended by English-only speakers, it would be quite a twist to see either artist flip the script, so the ‘No’ is a solid bet.

MORE SUPER BOWL PROPS:
Commercials | Broadcast | National anthem

Which Jennifer Lopez song will be performed first?

  • Let’s Get Loud +300
  • Jenny from the Block +500
  • Live It Up +500
  • On the Floor +500
  • Dinero +600
  • El Anillo +700
  • Waiting for Tonight +800
  • If You Had My Love +900
  • Get Right +1000
  • Love Don’t Cost a Thing +1200
  • Which Shakira song will be performed first?
  • Whenever, Wherever +250
  • Dare (La La La) +300
  • La Tortura +400
  • Can’t Remember to Forget You +500
  • Waka Waka (This Time for Africa) +600
  • Beautiful Liar +1000
  • Loca +1000
  • She Wolf +1200
  • La Bicicleta +1500
  • Si Te Vas +2000

There is no reason to bet two of the five favorites on this list. Dare and Waka Waka were Shakira’s World Cup songs, and it’s very unlikely that she uses them for the Super Bowl. It wouldn’t make sense to use those two songs since they are tied to soccer, so take a look at the additional value in longshots like Beautiful Liar and She Wolf.

SUPER BOWL 54 PREDICTIONS:
Straight up | Against the spread | SN staff picks

Which song will close out the halftime show?

  • Live It Up +200
  • Whenever, Wherever +250
  • Can’t Remember to Forget You +350
  • Let’s Get Loud +500
  • On the Floor +600

Will “Miami” by Will Smith be performed as a cover?

  • Yes +170
  • No -250

This 1990s song never caught on like other songs specifically praising a city, and Will Smith has distanced himself from both the song and his rap career. With that in mind, it’s unlikely we hear either artist cover the song, especially since both Shakira and J-Lo have diverse catalogs after more than two decades of success.

Will a football be used as a prop?

  • Yes +300
  • No -500

Will Alex Rodriguez be shown during the halftime show?

  • Yes +550
  • No -1000

Will DJ Khaled make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes +300
  • No -500

Will either singer drink Pepsi?

  • Yes +600
  • No -1500

MORE: Full Super Bowl 54 betting guide

Will Enrique Iglesias make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes +500
  • No -1000

Will Gerard Pique be shown during halftime show?

  • Yes +600
  • No -1500

Will Gloria Estefan make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes +250
  • No -400

Will Jay-Z be shown during halftime show?

  • Yes +600
  • No -1500

Will Ricky Martin make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes -130
  • No -110

Will Rihanna make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes +800
  • No -2500

Will Pitbull make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes -200
  • No +150

Of all the people who could make an appearance alongside Shakira and Jennifer Lopez, Pitbull is the most likely to be seen. Mr. Worldwide is a constant presence at events that bridge the entertainment and sporting worlds, and he has recently collaborated with both Shakira and Jennifer Lopez on separate songs. Pitbull loves Miami and named his record label Mr. 305 after the city’s area code, so he is quite likely to be on stage at some point.

Will Will Smith make an appearance on stage?

  • Yes +300
  • No -500

Will Shakira and Jennifer Lopez both sing in Spanish?

  • Yes -500
  • No +300

Will there be a wardrobe malfunction?

  • Yes +1000
  • No -2500

We will never see a wardrobe malfunction at the Super Bowl again. After Janet Jackson’s career was sidetracked at Super Bowl XXXVIII for the scandal dubbed “Nipplegate”, no artist will want to risk harming their image by being too raunchy. This is a free four percent.

Superbowl 40 halftime show

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