The Ultimate Roast Chicken

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Rinse the chicken with cool water, inside and out. Pat it dry with paper towels. Divide the herbs, keeping 1/2 of them whole. Finely chop the other half. In a small bowl, mash the softened butter with the chopped herbs, until combined. Rub the herbed butter under the skin, as well as all over the outside of the chicken. Season the bird all over with salt and pepper. Stuff the cavity with the orange, garlic, 1 onion, and the remaining herbs. Tie the legs together with kitchen twine to help hold its shape. Place the chicken, breast-side up, in a roasting pan. Put the remaining onion into the pan, which will help color and flavor the sauce. Lay the strips of bacon across the breast of the chicken and roast for 25 minutes.
  3. Remove the bacon and baste the chicken with the drippings and cook for another 25 minutes to brown the skin. The chicken is done when an instant-read thermometer reads 165 degrees F when inserted into the thickest part of the thigh (the legs of the chicken should wiggle easily from the sockets too.) Remove the chicken to a platter and let stand for 10 minutes, so the juices settle back into the meat before carving.
  4. Meanwhile, remove the softened onion from the roasting pan. Tilt the pan so the drippings collect in 1 corner, skimming off as much fat as possible, and leaving the drippings. Place the roasting pan on top of the stove over medium heat and take a wooden spoon to scrape up the flavor from the bottom of the pan. Stir the flour into the drippings to make a roux-like paste. Pour in the chicken broth in stages; continue to stir to dissolve the flour evenly to prevent lumps. Stir in the sherry and season with salt and pepper.
  5. To serve, carve the chicken tableside and squeeze the oranges from the cavity over the meat.
  6. Difficulty: Easy
  7. Serving suggestion: roast potatoes, watercress and gravy.

Tyler Florence’s Ultimate Roast Chicken

DIRECTIONS

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  • Rinse the chicken with cool water, inside and out. Pat it dry with paper towels. Divide the herbs, keeping 1/2 of them whole. Finely chop the other half.
  • In a small bowl, mash the softened butter with the chopped herbs, until combined. Rub the herbed butter under the skin, as well as all over the outside of the chicken.
  • Season the bird all over with salt and pepper. Stuff the cavity with the orange, garlic, 1 onion, and the remaining herbs. Tie the legs together with kitchen twine to help hold its shape.
  • Place the chicken, breast-side up, in a roasting pan. Put the remaining onion into the pan, which will help color and flavor the sauce. Lay the strips of bacon across the breast of the chicken and roast for 25 minutes.
  • Remove the bacon and baste the chicken with the drippings and cook for another 25 minutes to brown the skin. The chicken is done when an instant-read thermometer reads 165 degrees F when inserted into the thickest part of the thigh (the legs of the chicken should wiggle easily from the sockets too.) Remove the chicken to a platter and let stand for 10 minutes, so the juices settle back into the meat before carving.
  • Meanwhile, remove the softened onion from the roasting pan. Tilt the pan so the drippings collect in 1 corner, skimming off as much fat as possible, and leaving the drippings.
  • Place the roasting pan on top of the stove over medium heat and take a wooden spoon to scrape up the flavor from the bottom of the pan. Stir the flour into the drippings to make a roux-like paste. Pour in the chicken broth in stages; continue to stir to dissolve the flour evenly to prevent lumps. Stir in the sherry and season with salt and pepper.
  • To serve, carve the chicken tableside and squeeze the oranges from the cavity over the meat.

My best friend is leaving tomorrow. She works in another country and I miss her terribly whenever she’s away. It’s true that we keep in touch via Skype, Facebook and emails but I still miss the ability to pick up the phone and give her a call to whine whenever I’m having a bad day or to share some happy or exciting news when I’m having a good one. I miss going out for a cup of tea or breakfast..you know.. some girl time when I’m just me..not the Dr… not the mother… just plain and simple me.

It is rare to find someone who can understand you without much explanation..someone you enjoy the company of even in the simplest activities.. someone who knows you inside out and still likes you.

A friend is probably life’s most precious gift. I’m blessed to have a person who is all that and more in my life.

Today’s recipe is adapted from Tyler Florence’s ultimate roast chicken recipe with a number of changes. It is truly THE ULTIMATE roast chicken and I wouldn’t even try another recipe. You can’t top perfection. over-confident? Try out the recipe and then let me know what you think 🙂

The chicken will be so juicy and Full of flavor, the skin will be crisp and delicious and the butter will keep the flesh moist and yummy

You can serve this with mashed potatoes, grilled vegetables or use the sauce in the roasting bag to make gravy. I served two ways one with frekeh (it’s smoked green wheat that is absolutely delicious ) and the other with vegetables.

Ultimate roast chicken

1 chicken

1/2 a stick of butter

1/2 a head of garlic

1 onion divided into quarters

1 tablespoon thyme

2 tablespoon dried oregano

2 tablespoons parsley

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon all spice

1 teaspoon paprika

1 orange halved

1 table-spoon flour to dust the roasting bag

Preheat the oven to 200 C

Wash the chicken with water and vinegar

Pat dry with a towel

Season the chicken inside and out with salt, pepper and paprika

Mix the softened butter with the parsley, thyme and oregano

Carefully pass your finger between the skin and the flesh at the breast and thighs

Put some of the butter mixture under the skin at the breast and thigh and the rest in the cavity of the chicken

Add half the orange, garlic and half to the onions to the cavity

Dust a roasting bag with flour

Cut one of the corners to let out steam

Put the chicken in the bag with half the orange and remaining onion and tie it

Line a pan with aluminum foil, put the chicken, cover with aluminum foil

Place in the oven for an hour and a half

Open the bag carefully, paste the chicken with the liquid in the bag then place it under the broiler till it’s golden brown

‘Recipes are dead’: What the future of cooking might look like


Chef Tyler Florence cooks at his Wayfare Tavern in San Francisco in 2012. (Eric Risberg/AP) By Maura JudkisMaura Judkis Reporter covering culture, food and the arts December 6, 2017

There will be no more cookbooks from chef Tyler Florence. Sure, you’ve welcomed him into your home through his books “Tyler Florence Fresh” and “Dinner at My Place,” and his Food Network shows like “Tyler’s Ultimate.” But he will not print any more recipes. Why bother?

“I’ll publish a cookbook and I’ll have 125 recipes. People only use five,” he said. And they won’t even follow them: “They’ll use those as like a guide that they’ll kind of interchange different ingredients with.”

All of this has led Florence to a conclusion that seems unusual for a person who has spent his career producing recipes. “Recipes are dead,” said Florence. “They’re dead the same way paper maps are dead.”

Think about it: Maps help you find your destination, but it’s still pretty easy to get lost. But now we have GPS, which can precisely guide us to our location, automatically reroute us to avoid obstacles and tell us where to find gas or a sandwich along the way.

At the Smart Kitchen Summit in October, Florence announced that he had signed on with what he says will be the kitchen equivalent of GPS. He joined Innit, a start-up building a “connected food platform” — connecting the smart kitchen with software that aims to personalize and automate cooking. The company’s newly released app, the thing Florence thinks will be a recipe-killer, promises highly customizable “micro-cooking content.” It will offer thousands of permutations of meals, and it could preheat your oven, too. Eventually, it could go further — perhaps suggesting foods based on your genetic profile or how many steps your fitness tracker registered that day. It might be able to order your groceries or help you build your own meal kit. Someday, it might even know the entire contents of your fridge.


The Innit app includes video instruction for its customizable meals. (Innit /Innit ) The drive for customization

We have been writing recipes down for thousands of years. Yale University’s Babylonian Collection contains some of the world’s oldest, carved into three tablets from approximately 1700 B.C. “Instructions call for most of the food to be prepared with water and fats, and to simmer for a long time in a covered pot,” wrote the New York Times.

And recipes were similarly vague for the next few thousand years, because technique was something you learned from your mother. They’d call for “a piece of butter” or “more apples than onions,” but no quantities. Scientific precision entered the kitchen near the turn of the 20th century, introducing measurement, substitutions, calorie count and instruction.

The way we find and store recipes has evolved, too. Who among us hasn’t walked past a shelf of cookbooks while scrolling through Pinterest? But while the content on Epicurious or Allrecipes.com is easier to search, its recipes are still fixed entities. You can improvise, but you’re on your own.

Meanwhile, consumers have grown to expect customization. Consider Cava Mezze rice bowls or Sweetgreen salads or the vast array of poke toppings at other fast-casual restaurants. It’s a premise thoroughly embraced by millennials: Choose your protein, some vegetables, some sides, and some sauces or garnishes.

That’s how Innit’s eponymous app will work, too, but it’s more elaborate. First, you input some basic information — whether you’re allergic to shellfish or on the Paleo Diet. Then you pick a style of dish, like pasta or a grain bowl, select from an array of ingredients, and Innit will configure a recipe — er, some micro-cooking content — for you. It’s launching with a couple of broad templates — a few swipes will transform a chicken taco to a beet-pineapple salsa lettuce wrap, for example — with more to come. Florence’s flavor profiles keep the meals from becoming an episode of “Chopped.”

It’s about giving users “great combinations that are somewhat guardrailed,” said Joshua Sigel, Innit’s chief operating officer. “If they want to, we jokingly say, add Thai peanut sauce on top of a cupcake, that’s prerogative.”

It might remind you of another experiment in futuristic recipes: IBM’s Chef Watson. The computer program analyzed thousands of recipes, as well as data on the chemical compounds in food, to create flavor combinations encouraged by “computer-assisted creativity,” said Florian Pinel, a master inventor and trained chef who worked on Watson.

Though Chef Watson was originally intended to aid professional chefs, plenty of customers were more interested in menu variety than dish creativity, Pinel said. “Something that’s different from the other nights, but not wildly different; something that fits your dietary constraints or helps reduce food waste.”

Pinel says the company is no longer updating Chef Watson — though it may explore some nutrition or smart kitchen projects with the program in the future. A , in partnership with Bon Appétit, remains active.

The difference between Innit and Watson is that the former will not only design a meal for you, it will also walk you through how to make it with a video stitched together from hundreds of techniques that Florence filmed in the Innit offices. The steps are resequenced and times and nutritional information update dynamically as you swap ingredients in and out. The app will also operate certain smart appliances, and there’s more automation to come. Florence contends the app can even help novices learn how to cook.

“This is your sous-chef in the kitchen, and if you go along with the guidance, it’s going to help you get it right,” Florence said.

Teaching your appliances to cook
The Innit app can control some smart ovens. (Innit /Innit )

The recipes of the future won’t just be instructions for people. They’ll be instructions for appliances. Our devices will know more about how we cook.

It’s the concept of “the Internet of actions,” said Sarah Smith, research director of the Food Futures Lab at the Institute for the Future. First, the Internet connected us with information, and now, our objects can supply that information. The next step is for objects to perform tasks. After all, “a recipe is a series of instructions to take action,” Smith said. “The role of the recipe . . . becomes even more important when it’s fed into kitchen systems that are acting on your behalf.”

Bridge Kitchen, a forthcoming app, will eventually walk users through recipes by listening to what’s happening in their kitchen. Yes, you can call out to the app to ask how much paprika you need, but the company promises it will also hear audio cues to know where you are in the recipe — the sounds of chopping, or the sizzle of a frying pan. Those will encourage the app to automatically move to the next step, such as setting a timer or preheating your oven.

“For high-temperature stuff like searing, where you need to very carefully control the amount of time, we can synchronize a timer to the moment that searing sound starts,” said Arun Bahl, the company’s founder and chief executive. It raises privacy concerns, but Bahl says the audio is analyzed by software within the app, not on the cloud, and is deleted afterward. Bahl also says the app will help you time out multiple recipes so they can be completed at the same time. He is also working toward a feature that would allow users to take a photo of any cookbook recipe, whose text would be automatically incorporated into the app.

What food-tech companies are working toward is a vision of the future in which our digital assistants, appliances and health data are unified into a system that makes decisions seamlessly, guiding us to healthy choices and less food waste. It would look something like this: Midday, your phone’s personal assistant pings you with a few options for dinner. It knows that you went for a long run this morning and also that you’re a bit iron-deficient, because you supplied data from a company such as Habit, which uses DNA samples to suggest a personal nutrition profile. It also would know that you have chicken and kale in your fridge via sensors or computer vision — and that you should use the kale up soon. The meal you select calls for chickpeas and a few other ingredients you don’t have, so your phone automatically orders them from a grocery delivery service. Your phone has already preheated the oven, too. Your pan will monitor its own temperature so you don’t burn anything. Cooking will be automated, but not too automated.

“It’s the Ikea furniture effect: People have an irrational attachment to furniture they’ve helped to build,” Bahl said. “We need to still give them a role.”


Chef-authors Yotam Ottolenghi, left, and Sami Tamimi at The Post to promote the cookbook “Ottolenghi” in 2012. (Deb Lindsey/For the Washington Post) ‘We need sources of pleasure’

New-wave recipe apps target kitchen-shy millennials and harried moms — not people who live and breathe cooking. With their never-ending permutations of unfussy, healthy meals, they’re intended to break up the monotony of weekday cooking, not to help you make a showstopping holiday dinner. For that, we have cookbooks — which, despite Florence’s pronouncement, are holding strong. Cookbook sales were up 6 percent in 2016 over the previous year, Publishers Weekly reported. And most cookbook sales are print books; e-book sales are a minuscule part of the category. Maybe it’s because people are afraid to have pricey screens near hot oil — or that they find books easier to navigate: Dog-ear your favorite pages, and they’ll always be at your fingertips.

“Cookbooks are getting more and more tactile, with special flourishes on the cover and inside pages. They’re just getting more cookbooky,” said Rux Martin, editorial director of Rux Martin Books for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, who called recipe apps “just a blip in consciousness.” (Florence, naturally, disagrees: “A cookbook is an iPad with a screen that doesn’t work.”)

But it’s also because cookbooks aren’t merely reference. They’re aspirational. We want to be the kind of person who cooks her entire way through “The French Laundry Cookbook,” even if we manage only one recipe. A cookbook is like a New Year’s resolution: a commitment to a better version of yourself. You know you might fall short, but it’s the promise that counts.

So recipes may be dead in the eyes of Silicon Valley, but Martin suspects they aren’t going anywhere. The apps are practical, but will they make us swoon the way an Ottolenghi book does?

“Efficiency takes all the pleasure out of the kitchen,” Martin said. “We have enough recipes in the world. We don’t need new recipes. We need sources of pleasure.”

More from Food:

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Tyler Florence’s Ultimate Fish and Chips

  • Heat 3 inches of the oil in a deep fryer. Or you can heat 3 inches of oil in a deep pot. Peel the potatoes and cut them into chips, about the size of your index finger.
  • Put the potatoes in the oil. Fry the chips for 2 to 3 minutes; they should not be crisp or fully cooked at this point. Remove the chips with a spider strainer or slotted spoon, to a paper towel-lined platter to drain.
  • Put the chips back in the fryer for 4 to 5 minutes until crispy and brown. Take out and drain.
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, pepper, and egg. Pour in the soda water and whisk to a smooth batter.
  • Spread the rice flour on a plate. Dredge the fish pieces in the rice flour and then dip them into the batter, letting the excess drip off.
  • Now submerge the battered fish into the bubbling oil for 4 to 5 minutes until crispy and brown.
  • Remove and drain the fish with the chips on paper towels; season lightly with salt. Serve wrapped in a newspaper cone with malt vinegar and/or tartar sauce.
  • Tartar Sauce (about 1-1/4 cups): In a small mixing bowl, combine all tartar sauce ingredients. Chill before serving to let the flavors combine.

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Tyler Florence has teamed up with Innit to create an app that he calls the kitchen equivalent of GPS.

Last October, at the Smart Kitchen Summit, the celebrity chef and 16-time cookbook author told the audience that “recipes are dead; they’re dead the same way paper maps are dead.”

He went on to say that recipes have been one-dimensional, top-down dictations of a single dish. Home chefs don’t learn actual skills from recipes to push them forward in the kitchen, or how to customize dishes for dietary restrictions or preferences. And in an era in which we now tweak everything from our Starbucks orders to our poke bowls, customization is a must.

SiliconValley.com reports that Florence has teamed up with Innit, a Redwood City startup, to create an app that he calls the kitchen equivalent of GPS. Innit provides personalized meal recommendations, customizable, video-based, guided cooking instructions and smart appliance connectivity to do things like preheat your oven. Someday, the company says it might be able to suggest foods based on your blood type or genetics, something that Habit and 23andMe have already started doing.

Meals in the app are organized into categories such as Tacos and Wraps, Grain Bowls, Pastas, Chicken or Adaptive Roasts. They include calorie counts and can be customized 200 ways.

You enter your diet preferences, any foods you want to avoid or have allergies to and then AI produces results personalized for you. The app technology allows you to customize the number of servings, replace certain ingredients with others and shows very detailed and well-produced step-by-step videos based on the exact ingredients you use or have swapped out.

The app is free on both iOS and Android – check it out. Tyler is right: The recipe as we know it is now a dinosaur.

Technology The Lempert Report

4 Holiday Recipes Chef Tyler Florence Is Serving This Year

Chef Tyler Florence may be best known for his Food Network shows and San Francisco / Bay Area restaurants, but he’s also the lead food innovator (AKA recipe developer) of Innit, a free recipe app that helps make home cooking easy. We spoke to the chef about his picks from the app’s holiday dishes for a more effortless (and tasty) supper than ever.

Brit + Co: You are famous for some indulgent holiday recipes — from heavy-cream-cooked mashed potatoes to bacon-wrapped turkey. What are your go-to ways to lighten up traditional holiday fare without sacrificing flavor?

Tyler Florence: I like to make sure there’s a dish for everyone at the table, so this year we created two new vegan versions of classic recipes: vegan mashed potatoes made with roasted onion purée and crispy vegan cauliflower stuffing. There’s always a good chance that you’ll need to accommodate a vegetarian or vegan in the house.

B+C: What’s always on your table during the holidays?

TF: Prime rib with creamy horseradish is a classic dish for the holidays. Prime rib is a staple at my dinner table — it’s a Florence family favorite — and with only seven ingredients required, it doesn’t require a huge haul to the grocery store, which is a lifesaver when trying to navigating the grocery aisles in the days leading up to the holiday!

B+C: What are your fave holiday sweets to serve?

TF: To me, the holidays just aren’t the holidays without homemade pecan pie. Thanksgiving is all about pumpkin pie, but pecan takes the spotlight in December in my house (must be my Southern roots). There are so many ways you can get creative with it — from adding raisins, a gluten-free crust, or even a splash of bourbon for an extra kick. Christmas morning pancakes and classic, crumbly cobblers are coming soon !

Follow @eatinnit and @britandco on Instagram for more mouthwatering inspiration.

(Photos via Innit)

May 29, 2006 — — Think you’ve seen everything on barbequing? Tyler Florence, host of the new Food Network show “Tyler’s Ultimate,” has some recipes that will impress any grilling pro. Check out his recipe below for a delicious side dish for your barbecue meal.

Cole Slaw with Pecans and Spicy Chile Dressing

(Recipe courtesy Tyler Florence)

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

1 head Napa or Savoy cabbage, shredded

4 carrots, shredded

2 Granny Smith apples, thinly sliced

1 medium red onion, thinly sliced

1 cup pecans, toasted and chopped

Leaves from 1 bunch fresh mint, for garnish

Dressing:

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

3/4 cup mayonnaise

Juice of 1 lemon

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Throw the cabbage, carrots, apples, onion, and pecans into a large bowl. Mix that well with your hands and set aside.

In a small bowl, stir together the mustard, sugar, cayenne, cumin, mayonnaise, and lemon juice until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss well to coat. Taste again for seasoning, then mound onto a platter and garnish with mint leaves.

Tyler Florence’s Perfect Roast Chicken

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Tyler Florence’s Fried Chicken

Editor’s Note: If you can’t get to the South for traditional fried chicken, then bring a bit of the South to your dinner table with Tyler Florence’s Fried Chicken recipe. Crispy, crunchy, and using a medley of lemons and herbs, this is one fried chicken recipe you will want to make again and again. This recipe includes a multi-step process and includes brining the chicken prior to frying it, so plan ahead when making this quintessential Southern dish! You will definitely wow the crowd at your next potluck with this recipe up your sleeves.
I love nothing more than a simple, delicious, down-to-earth meal, and virtually all of Tyler Florence’s food fits the bill…especially his fried chicken, which will always have a place at the top of my list. He may now live on the West Coast, but one bite of his chicken reminds you that his heart still resides in his hometown of Greenville, South Carolina. As part of a dinner he hosted at the 2012 Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival, he served this dish, which brings together many of the best elements of the genre: brining, buttermilk batter, and double-dip in a heavily seasoned dredge. But what takes it over the edge is the oil he perfumes with fresh herbs and garlic — and the squeeze of fresh lemon — which infuses every bite with an extra layer of flavor.

Tyler Florence Makes His Restaurant’s Famous Fried Chicken

Food Network Star Tyler Florence is the owner of Wayfare Tavern in San Francisco, California. He returns to The Talk to make his restaurant’s famous fried chicken, a roasted corn and chipotle mayo and apple cobbler with a cider sauce!
Check out the recipes below!

WAYFARE TAVERN FRIED CHICKEN
Serves 6-8
Ingredients:
2 (3-3 1/2 lbs.) organic chickens

FOR THE ROASTING
2 bunches fresh rosemary
2 bunches fresh thyme
2 bunches fresh sage
10 ea. fresh bay leaves
3 ea. garlic cloves
1/4 cup olive oil
6 Tbsp freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp kosher salt
FOR THE FRYING
1 qt. buttermilk
1 Tbsp hot sauce (we like Crystal)
1 tsp sugar
1 gallon grapeseed or canola oil
1 head garlic
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup rice flour
1/2 cup garlic powder
1/2 cup onion powder
1/3 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup freshly ground black pepper
Flaky sea salt
4 ea. lemons, cut into wedges
Procedure:
FOR THE ROASTING
Preheat the oven to 200 degrees.
Strip 1/3 each of each of the herbs from the tough stems, roughly chop the rosemary, thyme, sage, along with half of the bay leaves and the garlic. Set the remaining herbs aside for frying.
Mix with the olive oil and add 2 Tbsp pepper and 3 Tbsp salt.
Rub the mixture onto the birds so the herbs stick to the skin.
Place the birds on a roasting pan and into the oven.
After 2 1/2 hours, remove the chicken from the oven.
The internal temperature between the breast and the thigh near the bone should be 150 degrees. At this stage, the chicken should be cooked 2/3 of the way through.
Let cool enough so you can handle the chicken.
FOR THE FRYING
Break the Birds into 10 pieces: Cut off the wings, the legs, thighs, and cut the breast pieces into half (you can save the backs and carcasses for stock or another use).
In a large bowl add the buttermilk and season with the hot sauce and the sugar.
Submerge the chicken in the buttermilk and let sit for 30 minutes.
Add the grapeseed oil to a large heavy-bottomed pot making sure there is at least 3 inches of clearance over the level of oil.
Break apart the head of garlic into cloves (keeping the skin on).
Turn the heat on medium-high and add the remaining rosemary, thyme, sage, bay leaves, and garlic cloves to the oil.
As the oil heats to 375 degrees, the herbs and garlic will perfume the oil (the crisped herbs and garlic will also serve as a garnish to the dish).
When crisp, transfer the herbs and garlic to a paper towel-lined plate and reserve for garnish.
While the oil continues to heat to 375 degrees, combine the flours, garlic and onion powders, 1/3 cup of the salt, and 1/4 cup of black pepper in a large bowl and mix thoroughly.
Remove the chicken from the buttermilk (do not dry) and coat the chicken well in the flour mixture.
With the oil now at 375 and without overcrowding the pot, fry the breaded chicken in batches for 6-8 minutes until all the pieces are golden brown.
Remove the chicken to a clean kitchen cloth and season the freshly fried chicken with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
Use a paper bag, brown parchment paper, or a clean napkin to line the bottom of a serving platter. Pile on the chicken and serve with the crispy herbs, garlic, and fresh lemon wedges.

ROASTED CORN WITH CHIPOTLE MAYO
Serves 6-8
Ingredients:
3-4 pieces fresh corn
4 Tbps olive oil
2 Tbsp kosher salt
FOR THE MAYO
1 cup mayonnaise
1 Tbsp ground chipotle
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp lime juice
GARNISH
1/2 bunch fresh cilantro
2-3 ea. limes, cut into wedges
Procedure:
FOR THE CORN
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Rub the corn with olive oil and salt, place in a roasting pan and cook for 12-15 minutes or until the corn is starting to brown.
FOR THE MAYONNAISE
In a medium-sized mixing bowl, mix together all the ingredients for the mayo with a whisk.
PLATE UP
Place all the corn on a serving platter with a nice dollop of the chipotle mayo on top, garnish with the fresh cilantro and lime wedges.

APPLE COBBLER WITH CIDER SAUCE
Serves 6-8
Ingredients:
FOR THE FILLING
6 ea. Granny Smith apples
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 1/2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp lemon juice
FOR THE CRUST
1/4 lb. brown sugar
2 Tbsp melted butter
1/4 cup and 2 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 cup and 2 tbsp APF
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp coriander
1 tsp salt
CIDER SAUCE
2 cups apple cider
2 cups water
2 cups sugar
1 pinch ground clove
1 tsp ground cinnamon
4 Tbsp cold butter
1 Tbsp lemon juice
GARNISH
Vanilla ice cream
Powdered sugar
Green apple for zesting
Procedure:
FOR THE COBBLER
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Mix all the filling ingredients into a bowl and place into a well-greased casserole pan 2-3 inches deep and set onto a sheet tray (this will help keep your oven clean if the sugar bubbles over).
Mix all the dry ingredients for the crust in a bowl and pour the melted butter over it. Mix by hand until you form a crumble. Top the apples in the pan with about 1 inch of the topping spread evenly from edge to edge.
Bake for about 35 minutes until golden brown.

FOR THE SAUCE
In a sauce pot, combine apple cider, sugar, water, cinnamon, clove and bring to a boil.
Once it starts to boil, turn heat down to medium-low and simmer for about 20-25 minutes until only about 2-3 cups remain in the pot.
Turn off heat and whisk in butter and lemon juice. Whisk constantly until the butter has fully melted and emulsified into the hot liquid.
Serve warm or cold.
PLATING
Place a healthy portion onto a plate or bowl and top with a scoop of ice cream, drizzling the cider sauce over it.
Dust with powdered sugar and zest of green apple.

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