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  • Make sure you know what foods are in season with our seasonal food calendar. It’ll work out cheaper, your fruit and veg will taste better and it’s more nutritious.

    When foods are in season, there’s more of it which means lots of supermarket deals and 2-for-1 offers. Bulk-buy and you can freeze joints of meat which might be more expensive in another month, or for example, when tomatoes are in season, make a batch of herby sauce and freeze in containers for pastas and soups.

    Take a look below to see what fruit and vegetables are in season each month and browse some of the recipes you could make…

    January seasonal food

    Chicken livers on toast with pomergranate seeds

    The parties are over, we’re all carrying a little extra Christmas weight, so time to get healthy. Oranges and lemons are coming into season, root veg like parsnips and swedes are in abundance, and salmon makes its seasonal debut.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Clementines
    Kiwi fruit (in season from mid-Jan)
    Lemons (coming into season)
    Oranges (coming into season)
    Passion fruit
    Pears
    Pomegranate

    Vegetables
    Beetroot (end of season)
    Brussel sprouts
    Cauliflower
    Celery (end of season)
    Celeriac
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild)
    Parsnips
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Rhubarb (coming into season)
    Shallots
    Swedes
    Turnips

    Meat
    Duck (end of season)
    Goose (end of season)
    Rabbit (available, but at its best Jul-Dec)
    Turkey
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Haddock
    Mussels
    Oysters
    Salmon (coming into season)

    Our favourite seasonal January recipes
    Salmon pasta with leeks and creme fraiche
    Roast root veg
    Easy leek and potato soup
    Cauliflower in three-cheese sauce
    Rhubarb and orange tart
    Citrus squares

    February seasonal food

    Only the hardiest of veggies are around in February – the only newcomer is purple sprouting broccoli – but there’s lots of lovely seafood in season. Keep the winter blues away with hearty recipes made with February’s seasonal foods.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley) (end of season)
    Clementines (end of season)
    Kiwi fruit
    Lemons
    Oranges
    Passion fruit
    Pears (end of season)
    Pomegranates

    Vegetables
    Brussel sprouts (end of season)
    Cauliflower
    Celeriac
    Kale (end of season)
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild) (end of season)
    Parsnips (end of season)
    Potatoes (maincrop) (end of season)
    Purple sprouting broccoli (coming into season)
    Rhubarb
    Shallots
    Swedes (end of season)
    Turnips (end of season)

    Meat
    Rabbit (available but at its best Jul-Dec)
    Turkey (end of season)
    Venison (end of season)

    Fish and seafood
    Haddock (end of season)
    Mussels (end of season)
    Oysters
    Salmon

    Our favourite seasonal February recipes
    Steamed purple sprouting broccoli with goat’s cheese
    Grilled cauliflower soup
    Mussel and shallot broth
    Carrot and parsnip hotpot
    Chicken with baked rhubarb

    March seasonal food

    In March, the weather (hopefully!) warms up, getting you in the mood for lighter dishes with spinach, spring onions and watercress coming into season. Enjoy the last of the mussels and oysters.

    Fruit
    Kiwi fruit
    Lemons (end of main season)
    Oranges (end of main season)
    Passion fruit (end of season)
    Pomegranates (end of season)

    Vegetables
    Cauliflower
    Celeriac (end of season)
    Leeks (end of season)
    Peppers (coming into season)
    Purple sprouting broccoli
    Rhubarb
    Shallots (end of season)
    Spinach (comes into season mid-March)
    Spring onions (coming into season)

    Meat
    Rabbit (still available)
    Turkey (still available)

    Fish and seafood
    Mussels (end of season)
    Oysters (end of season)
    Salmon

    Our favourite seasonal March recipes
    Spinach pie with peperonata
    Goat’s cheese with watercress salad
    Garlic and wine mussels
    Sausage and spring onion meatball pasta
    Creamy spinach and roasted vegetable lasagne

    April seasonal food

    asparagus burrata and prosciutto toast

    Enjoy early spring in April and the seasonal foods that come with it, the most well-known, of course, being lamb. Asparagus and apricots make their debut, and it’s also the season for tuna and crab.

    Fruit
    Apricot (coming into season)
    Kiwi fruit

    Vegetables
    Asparagus (coming into season)
    Cauliflower (end of season)
    Peppers
    Purple sprouting broccoli (end of season)
    Rhubarb
    Spinach
    Spring onions

    Meat
    Lamb (coming into season)
    Rabbit (still available)
    Turkey (still available)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab (coming into season)
    Salmon
    Tuna (coming into season)

    Our favourite seasonal April recipes
    Slow roast shoulder of lamb
    Greek lamb casserole
    Smoked salmon and asparagus omelette
    Tuna steaks with tomato butter

    May seasonal food

    May is the month when seasonal food gets really colourful, with peas, carrots and cherries coming into season, along with aubergines and rocket. The first of the new potatoes arrive, sardines and pollock are available too.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Cherries (coming into season)
    Kiwi fruit

    Vegetables
    Asparagus
    Aubergines (in season from late May)
    Carrots (in season from late May)
    New potatoes (coming into season)
    Peas (coming into season)
    Peppers
    Rhubarb (end of season)
    Rocket (coming into season)
    Spinach
    Spring onions
    Watercress (coming into season)

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit (available, but at its best Jul-Dec)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Pollock (pollack) (in season from mid-May)
    Salmon
    Sardines (in season from end of May)
    Tuna

    June seasonal food

    baked mackerel

    Summer really kicks off in June. It’s the best month for broad beans, pak choi and courgettes, while strawerries, raspberries, blueberries and tomatoes have started to ripen. Haddock and mackerel also come into season.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Blueberries (coming into season)
    Cherries
    Kiwi fruit
    Raspberries (coming into season)
    Strawberries (coming into season)
    Tomatoes (coming into season)

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe) (coming into season)
    Asparagus
    Aubergines
    Broad beans (in season mid-June)
    Carrots
    Courgettes (coming into season)
    Fennel (coming into season)
    New potatoes
    Pak choi (in season end of June)
    Peas
    Peppers
    Rocket
    Spinach (end of main season)
    Spring onions
    Turnips (summer season crop in season)
    Watercress

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit (available but best Jul-Dec)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock (coming into season)
    Mackerel (coming into season)
    Pollock (pollack)
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Tuna

    Our favourite seasonal June recipes
    Red berry shortcake
    Smoked mackerel and spring onion jacket
    Creamy spinach and haddock fillets
    Broad bean and pepper salad
    Pak choi with cannellini beans and garlic
    Green and red salad stack
    Fennel and salmon parcels

    July seasonal food

    Berries are in season and blackberries make their first appearance, along with melon and peaches. Sweetcorn, broccoli, beetroot and courgettes come into season and seafood lovers can enjoy fresh, seasonal scallops.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Blackberries (coming into season)
    Blueberries
    Cherries
    Kiwi fruit
    Melon (coming into season)
    Peaches (coming into season)
    Raspberries
    Strawberries
    Tomatoes

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Asparagus (end of season)
    Aubergines
    Beetroot (coming into season)
    Broad beans
    Broccoli (in season from end of July)
    Carrots
    Courgettes
    Cucumber (coming into season)
    Fennel
    New potatoes (end of season)
    Pak choi
    Peas
    Peppers
    Potatoes (maincrop) (coming into season)
    Rocket
    Spring onions (end of season)
    Sweetcorn (coming into season)
    Turnips (summer season crop)
    Watercress

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit (main season begins)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Pollock (pollack)
    Prawns
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Scallops (from mid-July)
    Tuna

    Our favourite July seasonal recipes
    Courgette fritters
    BBQ sweetcorn with lime and chilli butter
    Rabbit in red wine sauce
    Scallop, bacon and lamb’s lettuce salad

    August seasonal food

    Mediterranean vegetables are everywhere in August, berries are still going strong, broccoli is abundant and nectarines come into season. Think salads and smoothies. There’s lots of fish and seafood around too.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Blackberries
    Blueberries
    Cherries (end of season)
    Kiwi fruit (end of season)
    Melon
    Nectarines (coming into season)
    Peaches
    Raspberries
    Strawberries (end of season)
    Tomatoes

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Aubergines
    Beetroot
    Broad beans
    Broccoli
    Carrots
    Celery (coming into season)
    Courgettes
    Cucumber
    Fennel
    Pak choi
    Peas
    Peppers
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Rocket
    Sweetcorn
    Watercress

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit
    Venison (may still be available)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Pollock (pollack)
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Scallops
    Tuna

    Our favourite August seasonal recipes
    Stuffed peppers
    Iced berry smoothies
    Broad bean crostini
    Fruity chicken salad
    Crab, pea and redcurrant salad
    Warm broccoli and chicken salad

    September seasonal food

    September marks the end of summer berries, but there’s lots of other fruit like apples, plums, grapes, figs and pears. Pumpkin, squash, kale and leeks make their debut, lamb makes a comeback and it’s the start of the mussels season.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley) (coming into season)
    Apricots (end of season)
    Blackberries
    Blueberries (end of season)
    Grapes (short season to October)
    Figs (coming into season)
    Melon
    Nectarines
    Peaches (end of season)
    Pears (coming into season)
    Plums (coming into season)
    Raspberries (end of season)
    Tomatoes

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Aubergines
    Beetroot
    Broad beans (in season until early Sep)
    Broccoli
    Butternut squash (coming into season)
    Carrots
    Celery
    Celeriac (coming into season)
    Courgettes
    Cucumber (end of season)
    Fennel
    Kale (coming into season)
    Leeks (coming into season)
    Pak choi (end of season)
    Peas
    Peppers
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Pumpkin (coming into season)
    Rocket
    Sweetcorn
    Watercress

    Meat
    Duck (coming into season)
    Goose (coming into season)
    Lamb
    Rabbit
    Venison (coming into season)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Mussels (coming into season)
    Pollock (pollack)
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Scallops
    Tuna (until end Sep)

    Our favourite seasonal September recipes Lamb cutlets with pumpkin
    Leek and pear tart

    October seasonal food

    Autumn’s still great for fruit and veg. It’s the start of the season for wild mushrooms, cranberries and shallots, while squash and pumpkin are widely available. Oysters start their season and it’s turkey time too.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Blackberries (end of season)
    Cranberries (coming into season)
    Grapes (end of season)
    Figs
    Melon (end of season)
    Nectarines (end of season)
    Pears
    Plums (end of season)
    Tomatoes (end of season)

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Aubergines (until mid-October)
    Beetroot
    Broccoli (end of season)
    Butternut squash
    Carrots (end of season)
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Courgettes (end of season)
    Fennel (end of season)
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild) (coming into season)
    Parsnips
    Peas (end of season)
    Peppers (end of season)
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Pumpkin
    Rocket (end of season)
    Shallots (coming into season)
    Sweetcorn (end of season)
    Swedes (until mid-Oct)
    Turnips (winter crop coming into season)
    Watercress

    Meat
    Duck
    Goose
    Lamb (end of season)
    Rabbit
    Turkey (coming into season)
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Mussels
    Oysters (coming into season)
    Pollock (pollack)
    Prawns (end of season)
    Salmon (end of season)
    Scallops

    November seasonal food

    Root vegetables like swedes and parsnips sweeten in the November frost and as the festive season approaches, chestnuts, clementines and passion fruit are easy to come by. It’s also the season forthe love-hate Brussels sprout.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Clementines (coming into season)
    Cranberries
    Figs (end of season)
    Passion fruit (coming into season)
    Pears

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe) (end of season)
    Beetroot
    Brussels sprouts (in season from end of Nov)
    Butternut squash (end of season)
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild)
    Parsnips
    Potatoes
    Pumpkin
    Shallots
    Swedes
    Turnips
    Watercress (until early Nov)

    Meat
    Duck
    Goose
    Rabbit
    Turkey
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Crab (end of season)
    Haddock
    Mussels
    Oysters
    Pollock (pollack)
    Scallops

    Our favourite seasonal November recipes
    Clementine custard tart
    Buttered swede with crispy bacon
    Brie and cranberry torte
    Brussels sprouts with chestnuts
    Steak with parsnip mash

    December seasonal food

    It’s the season to be jolly in December as goose, duck and of course, turkey are in the shops. Cauliflower comes into season, as does sweet pomegranate, while hardy veggies like parsnip, swedes, turnips and sprouts are easy to find.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Clementines
    Cranberries (end of season)
    Passion fruit
    Pears
    Pomegranate (coming into season)

    Vegetables
    Beetroot
    Brussels sprouts
    Cauliflower (in season from mid-Dec)
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild)
    Parsnips
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Pumpkin
    Shallots
    Swede
    Turnips

    Meat
    Duck
    Goose
    Rabbit
    Turkey
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Haddock
    Mussels
    Oysters
    Pollock (pollack) (until start of Dec)
    Scallops

    Our favourite seasonal December recipes
    Roast turkey with chestnut, sage and apple stuffing
    Roast goose with apple and bay leaves
    Beetroot and pomegranate soup
    Celeriac, carrot and pearl barley bake
    Tana Ramsay’s Clementine tart

    What’s your favourite month or season for fresh produce? Do you love summer berries or is it spring vegetables that win you over? We’d love to hear your thoughts so join the conversation over on our Facebook page!

    You know those projects that are supposed to be quick and easy but turn out to be anything but? Story of my life. It was definitely the case with this guide to September produce. Of course, I picked one of the most abundant months to get started!

    I’m excited to get the ball rolling on this new monthly series about seasonal produce. I designed the series for my mom, who hesitates at the farmers’ market when she’s not sure what to do with that beautiful local produce at home. It’s also for Dana, who uses seasonal lists to plan upcoming blog recipes but mentioned that none of them are particularly attractive. It’s for all of you who requested more seasonal recipes and resources when I asked how to make this website work better for you.

    Naturally, produce peaks at different times in different areas of the U.S., so this is a general guide to the produce you’ll likely find at farmers’ markets around this time of year. You’ll find some short preparation tips for each type of produce, plus recipe lists for each (which include other bloggers’ recipes as well as my own).

    I owe a BIG thank you to Becky at The Vintage Mixer, for letting me base this resource on her “Eat Seasonal” monthly seasonal produce lists. Check out her September post for a cute, illustrated list that you can download to use as a desktop background or screensaver (it’s free!). Tag your seasonal produce and recipe pics #eatseasonal on Instagram so we can go check them out!

    So, ta da! I hope you like this new series. I am, of course, open to suggestions for improvement, and if you like it, you can look forward to seasonal posts published around the first of every month!

    Apples

    You know fall is coming because apples are here. I love crisp, chopped apples in salads with blue cheese and apple slices dipped into peanut or almond butter. Conventionally grown apples are exposed to lots of pesticides and then coated with wax, so organic apples are definitely worth the extra expense. Apples elsewhere:

    • Apple Pancake by Love and Lemons
    • Apple Spice Sorbet by My New Roots
    • Chopped Salad with Quinoa, Sweet Potato and Apples by Sprouted Kitchen
    • Gummy Bear Sangria by My Name is Yeh

    View more C+K apple recipes ↣

    blackberries

    Plump, juicy, sweet blackberries are a snack in themselves. They’re also lovely in baked goods and make a simple dessert when served with whipped cream. As a general rule, buy organic berries (they soak up pesticides). Blackberries elsewhere:

    • Blackberry Almond Skillet Cake by Turntable Kitchen
    • Blackberry Crisp Ice Cream by Naturally Ella
    • Blackberry Mango Fruit Leather by A House in the Hills
    • Two-Bite Blackberry Jam Bites by Oh, Ladycakes

    broccoli

    As it turns out, broccoli is totally irresistible once roasted with olive oil and sea salt. Like all brassicas, broccoli goes great with garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes and other bold flavors. Select small, tightly packed florets with minimal brown spots. Broccoli elsewhere:

    • Asian Quinoa Broccoli Slaw by Mountain Mama Cooks
    • Ginger Broccoli with Forbidden Rice by A House in the Hills
    • Roasted Broccoli Grilled Cheese by Two Peas and Their Pod
    • Simple, Salty, Sweet + Nutty Broccoli Soba by The First Mess

    View more C+K broccoli recipes ↣

    cabbage

    I can’t get enough cabbage! Cousin to broccoli, this potent anti-cancerous cruciferous vegetable is great raw, in slaws, roasted in pieces, or chopped and sautéed with olive oil and garlic. Select cabbages with compact heads that feel heavy for the their size. Cabbage generally keeps for a pretty long time in the vegetable crisper, so it’s a good ingredient to keep on hand. Cabbage elsewhere:

    • Kale and Cabbage Coleslaw with Marcona Almonds by Foodie Crush
    • Pasilla Chile and Lime Cabbage Slaw by Sprouted Kitchen
    • Sesame-Crusted Avocado and Cabbage Spring Rolls by Naturally Ella
    • Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tacos with Cilantro Cabbage Slaw by Mountain Mama Cooks

    View more C+K cabbage recipes ↣

    carrots

    Watery baby carrots have been tarnishing grown-up carrots’ reputation for years. I love to turn full-sized raw carrots into “noodles” with my julienne peeler or “ribbons” with a regular peeler. Carrots are also fantastic when well roasted—leave them in the oven until they are deeply caramelized and golden. Carrots elsewhere:

    • Carrot Cake Baked Doughnuts by The Fauxmartha
    • Carrot Green Chimichurri by Love and Lemons
    • Carrot Soup Recipe with Roasted Chickpeas by Vintage Mixer
    • Quick Pickled Carrot Spears by Simple Bites

    View more C+K carrot recipes ↣

    cauliflower

    Cauliflower: Trendy since 2012, good for you since forever! Roasting cauliflower with olive oil and sea salt transforms the cruciferous vegetable from bland to French fry irresistible. You can also pulse raw cauliflower in the food processor to give it a rice- or couscous-like texture. I was skeptical about cauliflower crust pizza, but it can actually be pretty good! Cauliflower elsewhere:

    • Cauliflower and Roasted Garbanzo “Rice and Peas” by The First Mess
    • Raw Cauliflower “Couscous” Greek Salad by Vintage Mixer
    • Roasted Cauliflower and Chickpea Tacos by Two Peas and Their Pod
    • Shaved Cauliflower Salad by Happyolks

    View more C+K cauliflower recipes ↣

    corn

    Sweet corn can be grilled, roasted or eaten raw. Raw corn marinated in sour lime juice is especially delicious, as is slightly charred corn that has been grilled in the husk. To avoid genetically modified corn, buy organic. Corn elsewhere:

    • Corn and Goat Cheese Pizza by Sprouted Kitchen
    • Green Rice Salad with Nectarines and Corn by Not Without Salt
    • Pickled Corn Succotash Salad by Dolly and Oatmeal
    • Grilled Corn and Pasilla Pepper Salad by Foodie Crush

    View more C+K corn recipes ↣

    cucumbers

    Crisp cucumber is a lovely addition to raw salads. Its vitamin-rich, hydrating qualities make it an excellent juicing ingredient. Peeled, muddled and strained cucumber makes an incredibly refreshing cocktail. Cucumber water is a treat—just soak cucumber and lemon slices in a pitcher of water. Cucumber elsewhere:

    • Chili Lime Cucumber Noodles on Salted Watermelon by The First Mess
    • Dill Cucumber Salad by Foodie Crush
    • Grandma’s Cucumber Salad by Lauren’s Latest
    • Ottolenghi’s Green Gazpacho by Yummy Supper

    View more C+K cucumber recipes ↣

    eggplant

    Eggplant can be hard to love at times. I like cubed, roasted eggplant in pasta, and creamy baba ghanoush, which is similar to hummus, with pita bread. Eggplant pairs especially well with garlic, lemon, parsley, basil, onions and bell peppers. Eggplant elsewhere:

    • Grilled Eggplant Parmesan Nachos by Climbing Grier Mountain
    • Grilled Eggplant Rolls With Cream Cheese And Herbed Millet by Naturally Ella
    • Quinoa Crusted Eggplant Parmigiana by Kitchen Confidante
    • Spiced Eggplant and Cucumber Salad by A Couple Cooks

    fennel

    Licorice-flavored fennel can be an acquired taste, but I can’t get enough of the crisp texture and delicate flavor. I like to shave raw fennel super fine for salads and slaws, which is made easier with a mandoline. Fennel elsewhere:

    • Fennel And Apple Salad With Toasted Fennel Vinaigrette by Not Without Salt
    • Grilled Fennel and Quinoa Salad by The First Mess
    • Pasta With Fennel, Arugula and Lemon by Sprouted Kitchen
    • Spanish Carrots with Fennel, Toasted Hazelnuts and Slide Ridge Honey Wine Vinegar by Vintage Mixer

    grapes

    I love grapes, but I don’t have any recipes that call for them! I recently discovered the magic that is roasted grapes. Roasted grapes are sweet, jammy and delicious on goat cheese crostini. Grapes elsewhere:

    • Chocolate Covered Grapes by My Name is Yeh
    • Grape, Avocado and Arugula Salad by Gimme Some Oven
    • Grape Salsa on Goat Cheese Crostini by Sprouted Kitchen
    • Pickled Grapes by Not Without Salt

    green beans

    Green beans are easily overlooked. They go great with almonds, basil, butter, Parmesan, olive oil, onions, parsley, potatoes, shallots, tomatoes and vinegar. I’m afraid I only have one green bean recipe (click on the above photo for a summery quinoa, feta, and green bean salad). Green beans elsewhere:

    • Crunchy Bean, Quinoa and Carrot Salad by Green Kitchen Stories
    • Green Bean and Toasted Almond Salad by A House in the Hills
    • How To Build A Grilled Green Bean Salad With Ingredients You Already Have by Simple Bites
    • Roasted Garlic Green Beans with Lemon and Parmesan by Edible Perspective

    kale

    I’m obsessed with kale. You’re obsessed with kale. We all love kale, and for good reason! It’s tremendously good for you and totally delicious, given the right preparation. Chop kale for stir-fries or a side of greens (sauté in olive oil and garlic), or massage it with a dash of salt for salads (see any of my kale salads for further instruction), or lightly coat roughly chopped kale with olive oil and roast it for kale chips. You can also blend kale into smoothies or juice it. Kale elsewhere:

    • Kale, Spinach and Pear Smoothies by Joy the Baker
    • Kale Caesar Salad with Crispy Garbanzo Bean Croutons by Mountain Mama Cooks
    • Kale with Japanese Sesame Dressing by Yummy Supper
    • Mushroom and Kale Grilled Cheese by Foodie Crush

    View more C+K kale recipes ↣

    melons

    Hydrating summer melons are a treat in themselves. Get your fill of watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew while you still can. Try throwing big slices of melon onto the grill for more savory applications. Melons elsewhere:

    • Cantaloupe Lime Popsicles by Kitchen Confidante
    • Fig And Melon Salad With Creamy Lemon Vinaigrette by Not Without Salt
    • Jalapeño Watermelon Margaritas by Gimme Some Oven
    • Salted Cantaloupe Honey Sorbet by Simple Bites

    View more C+K watermelon recipes ↣

    peaches

    Fresh, local peaches are the epitome of summer. Feel free to eat them whole over the sink. You can grill pitted and halved peaches for salad or dessert, or bake chopped peaches in any number of fruity, juicy desserts. Peaches elsewhere:

    • Grilled Stone Fruit and Almond Mascarpone Dip by Desserts for Two
    • Grace’s Spicy Peach Jam by Love and Lemons
    • Grilled Halloumi and Peaches with Dukkah by My New Roots
    • Grilled Portobello and Peach Burgers by Green Kitchen Stories

    View more C+K peach recipes ↣

    pears

    Pears can be finicky. They’re generally more grainy than their cousins, the apples, and ripeness is fleeting. They are delicious, however. Pears play nicely with blue cheese and balsamic vinegar in sweet-and-savory salads. In desserts, they’re lovely with warming spices, cream, honey and lemon. Pears elsewhere:

    • Easy Honey-Sweetened Pear Butter by Gimme Some Oven
    • Grilled Pears with Cinnamon Drizzle by A House in the Hills
    • Sautéed Pear and Plum Salad by The Year in Food
    • Whole Wheat Pancakes with Pears by The Vanilla Bean Blog

    View more C+K pear recipes ↣

    peppers

    Peppers! Spicing up dinner in the New World for as long as we can remember. September is prime time for rich, vibrant peppers. Look for bell peppers, jalapeños, poblanos and more. Peppers elsewhere:

    • Blistered Shishito Peppers by Spoon Fork Bacon
    • Lentil Stuffed Peppers by Kitchen Confidante
    • Panzanella with Cherry Tomatoes and Bell Peppers by A Couple Cooks
    • Red Pepper Pasta with Mushrooms and Spinach by What’s Gaby Cooking

    View more C+K bell pepper recipes ↣

    potatoes

    Who doesn’t love a crispy potato? Roasting cubes of potatoes brings out way more flavor than boiling them. Varieties outside of the standard Russet (especially the more colorful potatoes) tend to offer more nutritional value. Buy organic! Potatoes elsewhere:

    • Crispy Baked Garlic Matchstick Fries by Minimalist Baker
    • Game Day Potato Skins by What’s Gaby Cooking
    • Potato Breakfast Gratin with Red Peppers & Parmesan by The Kitchn
    • Roasted Potato and Paprika Chickpea Salad by A House in the Hills

    View more C+K potato recipes ↣

    pumpkins

    Shhh, don’t tell, but pumpkins actually aren’t all that flavorful by themselves. The pumpkin craze that strikes every fall is really just a collective craving for creamy texture and warming spices. It’s a pretty irresistible combination, for sure. Roast fresh pumpkin for savory dishes or toss it into the food processor to make homemade pumpkin purée. (The moisture content in homemade pumpkin purées can vary significantly, which is why most bakers opt for canned.) Pumpkins elsewhere:

    • Homemade Pumpkin Pasta by Minimalist Baker
    • Mini Pumpkin Empanadas with Vegan Spelt Crust by What’s Cooking, Good Looking
    • Pumpkin and Coconut Muffins by Green Kitchen Stories
    • Roasted Pumpkin and Goat Cheese Frittata with Arugula Salad by Naturally Ella

    View more C+K pumpkin recipes ↣

    radishes

    How I love radishes! Raw, chopped radishes lend a spicy crunch to salads and makes a great garnish for fresh Mexican meals. I often prefer radishes to raw red onion, which can easily overwhelm other raw ingredients. Whole, raw, spicy radishes served with butter and flaky salt are an incredibly simple and delicious appetizer. I also love pickled radishes, but the verdict is still out on roasted radishes. Radishes elsewhere:

    • Breakfast Tacos with Avocado Radish Salsa by The Year in Food
    • Charred Corn Tacos With Zucchini-Radish Slaw by Smitten Kitchen
    • Radish and Egg Salad Sandwiches by A Couple Cooks
    • Super Simple Radish Salad with Crème Fraiche by Yummy Supper

    View more C+K radish recipes ↣

    raspberries

    Good raspberries are transcendent. They can be hard to come by because they don’t keep as long as other berries. Ripe raspberries are sweet, tender but not mushy, and pretty much perfect as is. They go great with cream, lemon, vanilla, almonds, honey and other berries. Raspberries elsewhere:

    • Double Chocolate Raspberry Brownies by Oh, Ladycakes
    • Quick and Easy Raspberry Fool by Foodie Crush
    • Raspberry Chia Jam by A House in the Hills
    • Raspberry Ripple Buckwheat Porridge by My New Roots

    View more C+K raspberry recipes ↣

    squash

    Summer squash and winter squash collide in farmers’ markets this time of year. Summer squash varieties (like zucchini and yellow squash) have a thin skin that doesn’t require peeling. Most winter squash (like butternut and kabocha, but not delicata) have thick skins that usually need to be removed. Squash elsewhere:

    • Summer Squash Pasta with Green Goddess Dressing by Sprouted Kitchen
    • Vegan Zucchini and Yellow Squash Gratin by Minimalist Baker
    • Zucchini Bread Pancakes by Smitten Kitchen
    • Zucchini Summer Skillet with Poached Eggs and Garlic Brown Butter Baguettes by How Sweet Eats

    View more C+K summer squash recipes ↣

    tomatoes

    Tomatoes are in full swing right now. Ripe tomatoes don’t need much help when it comes to preparation—a sprinkle of sea salt and a drizzle of olive oil is about all you need. Raw and roasted tomatoes are also amazing with garlic and basil. I’m pretty obsessed with burst cherry tomatoes—whether roasted or cooked in a pan on the stovetop—they never let me down. Tomatoes elsewhere:

    • Chopped Tahini Salad with Crushed Pine Nuts and Mint by Dolly and Oatmeal
    • Heirloom Tomato Salad Recipe by 101 Cookbooks
    • Pesto and Roasted Tomato Omelet by Edible Perspective
    • Roasted Cherry Tomato Bowls by Love and Lemons
    • Super Powered Tomato and Basil Collard Wraps by The First Mess

    View more C+K tomato recipes ↣

    Looking for an ingredient that didn’t make the list? Check my new ingredient index for relevant recipes.

    More resources you might appreciate: fruit and vegetable tools you actually need, 16 recipes that pack well for lunch (see also, lunch packing tips) and 10 fresh and filling salad recipes.

    September might be the best time of the year for fresh fruits and vegetables. Farmers’ markets, and even big-box grocery stores, seem to be overflowing with beautiful produce ripe for the picking. And if your eyes are bigger than your tummy, there are easy ways to preserve this month’s bounty so you can enjoy fresh flavours throughout the late fall and winter. Here’s what you should shop for (and make) well in to October.

    Photo, Erik Putz. Food styling, Ashley Denton. Prop styling, Emily Howes.

    You can get apples year-round in Canada, but they’re at their peak in the fall. If you’re feeling extra festive, head out to an orchard and pick your own—here’s a handy guide to apple varieties.

    • Peanut butter apple crisp
    • Apple cobbler
    • Parsnip, apple and leek soup

    Beets

    Beet salad. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Beets keep well for months, which is why they’re usually associated with winter. They’re also hearty and sweet, but nevertheless, they’re yummy all throughout the year.

    • Roasted beet salad with tahini dressing
    • Beet-cured salmon gravlax
    • Chocolate beet brownies

    Blueberries

    Blueberry crumb cake. Photo, Erik Putz.

    We’re approaching the end of blueberry season, so pop as many in your mouth while you still can!

    • Blueberry crumb cake
    • Blueberry pie
    • Smoky brie with wild blueberry sauce

    Bok choy

    Celeriac “ramen.” Photo, Erik Putz.

    Find local varieties of bok choy in store during the summer and into the fall.

    • Celeriac “ramen” in mushroom-miso broth
    • Sesame green beans and bok choy
    • Bok choy salad

    Brussels sprouts

    Maple Brussels sprouts. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Brussels sprouts have come a long way from being one of the most loathed vegetables at the supermarket. Eat them roasted or shredded and raw in a super healthy salad.

    • Maple Brussels sprouts
    • Baked salmon with acorn squash and Brussels sprouts
    • Kale salad with Brussels sprouts and cranberries

    Cauliflower

    Cauliflower tacos. Photo, Sian Richards.

    This superstar veggie is incredibly versatile, which is probably why it’s so popular.

    • Cauliflower tacos
    • Chicken fried cauliflower rice
    • Mint cauliflower tabbouleh

    Celery

    Slow cooker split pea and ham soup. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Along with being a veggie platter staple, celery provides depth of flavour to soups and stews—it’s also essential to garnish a Caesar.

    • Slow cooker split pea and ham soup
    • Creamy celery and fennel soup
    • Buffalo chicken burger

    Corn

    Grilled corn. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Sweet cobs of corn, doused in butter and salt, are one of the season’s greatest gifts. Enjoy the good stuff before the frost sets in.

    • Pesto-parmesan grilled corn
    • Corn pasta salad
    • Filipino grilled corn

    Eggplant

    Roasted eggplant with tahini sauce. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Eggplants are at their peak right now, so while you can enjoy them year-round, you’ll want to plan a few eggplant-filled meals now.

    • Roasted eggplant with sumac-tahini sauce
    • Thai eggplant dip
    • Rigatoni pasta with eggplant and ricotta

    Field cucumber

    Cucumber and potato salad. Photo, Roberto Caruso.

    Greenhouse-grown cucumbers are available year-round, but you’ll find cukes grown outside, which are typically wider, only until October.

    • Cucumber potato salad
    • Peanut and pork ramen
    • Cucumber-jalapeno mocktail

    Field tomatoes

    Herbed cherry tomatoes. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Nothing beats the flavour of sun-ripened, field tomatoes—the greenhouse varieties don’t even come close. Eat them raw, or preserve them to enjoy throughout the winter.

    • Tomato and zucchini tartlets
    • Herbed cherry tomatoes
    • Tuscan white bean and tomato pasta

    Garlic

    Ginger-garlic glazed ribs. Photo, Roberto Caruso.

    Garlic can be stored year-round, but it’s harvested from July to October, so celebrate the season with dishes that pack some serious bite.

    • Middle Eastern garlic sauce (toum)
    • Herb and garlic turkey
    • Glazed ginger-garlic ribs

    Grapes

    Grape sorbet. Photo, Sian Richards.

    If you want to buy locally grown grapes, you should shop for them in September (and perhaps try some Canadian-made wine while you’re at it).

    • Spatchcock roast chicken with grapes
    • Grape sorbet
    • Warm chicken salad with roasted grapes and chèvre

    Leeks

    Leek and pancetta galettes. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Leeks provide so much flavour to savoury dishes. Just be sure to wash them well and don’t eat them raw (they just don’t taste that good before they’re cooked).

    • Leek and pancetta galette
    • Skillet chicken pot pie
    • Roasted cauliflower and leek pasta

    Nectarines

    Shrimp quesadillas with nectarines recipe. Photo, Roberto Caruso.

    Nectarines and peaches can be used interchangeably, but there are a few difference between these popular stone fruits—namely, peaches have fuzzy skin, while nectarines are smooth (and sweeter!).

    • Grilled nectarine crumble
    • Shrimp quesadillas with nectarines
    • Chicken, nectarine and plum stir-fry

    Peaches

    Peach upside down cake. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Peach season its reaching its grand finale, so enjoy this limited-time fruit while you still can!

    Peach recipes

    • Peach upside-down cake
    • Peach cobbler muffins
    • Cornbread panzanella salad with peaches, chicken & tomatoes

    Plums

    French toast with roasted plums. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Plums make the perfect snack as-is, but they’re even more delicious when baked, roasted or turned into jam.

    • Financier plum cake
    • French toast with roasted plums
    • Roasted plum chutney

    Raspberries

    Raspberry pie. Photo, Roberto Caruso.

    Prolong summer by buying pints of raspberries. Eat them plain, stir them into yogurt, or better yet, bake with them.

    • Raspberry and streusel coffee cake
    • Raspberry pie
    • Raspberry charlotte

    Summer squash (including zucchini)

    Pesto and zucchini noodles. Photo, Erik Putz.

    Summer squash (immature squash that has soft, edible skin), which includes both green and yellow zucchini, is what you want for dinner in September. It’s the ideal way to slowly ease your way into heartier fall cooking.

    • Pesto and zucchini noodles
    • Grilled zucchini and pear salad
    • Chocolate zucchini muffins

    Fruit and Vegetables in Season in September

    Don’t forget to download the free printer friendly guide to fruit and vegetables in season in September!

    September has creeped up on us this year, don’t you think? So I’m back sharing the best of what fruit and vegetables are in season this month. September is the month of blackberries, courgettes and runner beans, but the shops are bursting with cheap homegrown produce this month. Take a look!

    Fruit in Season in September

    Apples

    Bilberries

    Blackberries ( try this blackberry and vanilla jam recipe and if you have some left over then here’s a clever trick on how to make blackberries last longer!)

    Blueberries

    Bramley Apples

    Crab Apples

    Damsons

    Elderberries (try this delicious spiced elderberry syrup)

    Pears

    Plums

    Raspberries

    Redcurrants

    Vegetables in Season in September

    Artichoke

    Aubergine

    Beetroot

    Broccoli

    Brussels Sprouts (try this tasty Brussels Sprout Gratin)

    Cabbage – Red, White, Savoy and Spring Green

    Carrots

    Cauliflower

    Celeriac

    Celery

    Chillies

    Courgettes

    Cucumber

    Fennel

    French Beans

    Garlic

    Horseradish

    Kale

    Kohlrabi

    Leeks

    Lettuce – Cos and Iceberg

    Mangetout

    Marrow

    Onions

    Pak Choi

    Peas

    Peppers

    Potatoes

    Pumpkin

    Radishes

    Runner Beans

    Shallots

    Spinach

    Spring Onions

    Squash (try roasting your butternut squash seeds to make a tasty snack too!)

    Sweetcorn

    Tomatoes

    Turnips

    Watercress

    Wild Mushrooms (see my post on how to dry mushrooms if you have too many!)

    Herbs & Nuts in Season in September

    Chestnuts

    Chives

    Cobnuts

    Coriander

    Oregano

    Mint

    Parsley

    Rocket

    Rosemary

    Sage

    Sorrel

    Thyme

    There’s so much tasty produce on offer that I don’t know where to start! What are you cooking/baking this month? Print off the free guide to help you out!

    Images: 1. By Dwight Sipler , via Wikimedia Commons / 2. / 3. Flickr User Sampsa / 4.

    What fruit and vegetables are in season in September in Italy?

    Welcome back to our monthly appointment with fruit and vegetable seasonality. September holds a great responsibility: a major season change, the beginning of Fall harvest and the need for new nutrients that will sustain us through the work year ahead. Here’s our brand new list of what fruit and vegetables are in season in September in Italy.

    Even though Italians have cooking and eating seasonal produce in their DNA, lately mass distribution and globalization have confused these annually, natural guidelines, making the calendar distinction in our shopping bag a little fuzzy.

    VEGETABLES

    Arugula (Rocket)

    Strong and peppery, with spiky leaves that boast a slight ‘bite’ to them, arugula (or rocket) is the perfect addition to a mixed green salad. If you see ‘rucola’ or ‘rughetta’ for sale on the market stall, grab it while you can –– fresh, organic arugula is in season between July and September, so better get your fill while it’s still in the market!

    Basil

    The sweet, strong aroma and flavor of basil graces Italian tables until the end of September. I am already in mouring. Fortunately I can preserve the magic of basilico by pounding the last fresh harvest in a pestle and mortar (or blitzed in short bursts in a food processor) with garlic, pine nuts, pecorino and olive oil to make pesto.

    Broccoli

    Like cabbage and cauliflower, broccoli is a cruciferous (brassica) and is sometimes known by its Italian name, Calabrese. Its tight clusters of deep green buds and thick, edible stems are a great source of Vitamin C and calcium. Go for firm, bright green, undamaged heads (if it’s yellow its already past its peak) and firm stalks. In season between late spring to November.

    Carrot

    Available in Italy at its best between June and October, carrots are some of the most versatile root vegetables around, thanks to their sweet flavor, which means they can be used raw or cooked, in both sweet or savory dishes. Particularly tender and sweet, young, thin carrots are best purchased with their feathery greens still attached. Trivia: Did you know that up to the Middle Ages, all carrots were purple? The orange variety was first developed in 16th-century Netherlands by patriotic growers who bred it in tribute to king William I of Orange.

    Celeriac

    he unsung hero of the vegetable world is available year round but is at its best from September to May. Knobby, odd-shaped celeriac is recognizeable in the market as the weird root with rhino-tough skin. The surprise is the subtle, celery-like flavor, with nutty overtones. Try it as mash, in big-flavored, slow-cooked stews, or in its classic form, and as they do en France, as a remoulade.

    Cucumber

    In season in Italy between July and September, cukes are cucurbits, which means they’re from the same family as the melon, zucchini and squash. Usually more than 90% water, cetrioli originated in India, cultivated for at least 3,000 years, and probably introduced to other parts of Europe by the Greeks or Romans. These are reported to have used cucumbers to treat scorpion bites, bad eyesight, and to scare away mice. Available July to September.

    Eggplant (or Aubergine) are at peak season between May and September. Whether slender, speckled and striped, or bulbous, glossy, deep purple zepplin-like, melanzane are a staple in southern Italian cuisine. Eggplant’s mildly smoky flavor and flesh that’s spongy when raw but soft and meaty when cooked, lends itself to a large number of very popular Mediterranean dishes, like “melanzane alla parmigiana” (Eggplant Parmesan) for example, in which the aubergine slices are fried and then layered with tomato sauce, cubed mozzarella and fresh basil, dusted with grated Parmigiano and then baked in the oven.

    Fennel

    Fennel’s typical bulb is delightful eaten raw, with a texture that is crisp and the flavor assertive and anisseedy; while when cooked, fennel bulbs taste sweeter and the texture is softer, almost buttery. Available May to December, the fronds of the fennel bulb are also a welcome aromatic addition to Sicilian pasta dishes and other Mediterranean preparations.

    Part of the lily, or “allium” family, of which onions are also a member, aglio (garlic) is one of the most indispensable ingredients around, and plays a pivotal role in Mediterranean cuisine. The dried bulbs, assembled in braids, are available all year round, but fresh garlic appears in Italian markets between June and October. Bulbs are composed of many individual cloves enclosed in a thin papery white, mauve or purple skin. The flavor is fiery, pungent and crunchy when raw, as it cooks it becomes more mellow and creamy. Sauteéd in olive oil, garlic is used as a flavor punch in many recipes, sauces, stews and meat roasts. Rub a raw, peeled clove on toasted slices of homestyle bread and drizzle with cold-pressed olive oil with a dash of sea salt for the ultimate bruschetta experience.

    Green bean

    I know what you’re thinking: “I can open a bag of frozen green beans any time of year” but what a pity it would be to miss out on the fantastic flavor of in-season green beans! Green beans, also known as string beans, or snap beans are now in season, and are a delicious summer legume with an impressive antioxidant capacity. Available fresh between July and September, so get your green bean action on.

    Kohlrabi (cavolo rapa)

    Looking something like a Sputnik rocket in vegetable form, with a squat bulb and antennae-like shoots, kohlrabi is part of the cabbage family. The Italian name cavolo rapa translates as ‘turnip cabbage’ and the mild, sweet flavor is somewhere between a turnip and a water chestnut, with a crisp, crunchy texture. It can be found in two colors, pale green and the less common purple. Available all year round, kohlrabi is at its best from mid-July to mid October, but peaking in August-September. Contains awesome amounts of potassium, magnesium and Vitamin C.

    Mint

    Mint is at its peak from May to September: look for bright green, perky leaves that aren’t wilting. There are several types of mint, each with its own subtle difference in flavor and appearance. The most popular type is spearmint, with its pointy, serrated leaves and a familiar refreshing taste. Peppermint has longer, darker leaves and a stronger flavor and is popular in desserts and confectionary. In Italy, and Rome in particular, mentuccia (a wild-growing variety known as calamint, nepetella, or Emperor’s mint) is commonly added to braised artichokes, frittata or tripe.

    Peas

    Fresh peas are available almost all year round and at their peak between May and November. As is the case with all types of legume, they are best eaten just-picked, either raw in salads or braised in butter with pancetta and shallots.

    Peppers

    Sometimes called bell peppers or capsicums, these sweet, mild peppers come in variety of colors, and are related to chilies. Whatever color you find them (at their peak between the end of July and October) they’re all essentially the same variety, but have been allowed to ripen to different degrees; green are the youngest and sharpest, followed by yellow, orange and then red, which are the sweetest. You can also find longer, pointed examples, locally called peperone corno (horn), which are sweeter still, and the sweetest are the miniature friggitelli, which look like unripened green chili peppers, but that once tossed in a pan with just a drizzle of olive oil and an unshelled clove of garlic, reveal a sweet and smoky flavor.

    Samphire

    Samphire has vibrant green stalks, somewhat similar to baby asparagus, with a distinctively crisp and salty taste. It grows in rocky, salt-sprayed regions along the sea coast or in seaside marsh areas. It is sometimes called sea asparagus or sea pickle. It can be used raw in salad, though it tends to be very salty so it’s more often boiled or steamed for a few minutes. In season July through mid-September.

    Spinach

    The bitter, earthy flavor of spinaci is distinctive and particularly complements dairy products and eggs. Available between April and December, the milder, young leaves can be eaten raw in a salad, while the older ones are usually cooked (spinach has one of the shortest cooking times of all vegetables – two minutes max!). Watch out, since it also reduces dramatically in volume during cooking.

    Swiss chard

    Available all year round, but best from July through to early November, Swiss chard is also known as just plain chard, and has large, fleshy, tender deep green leaves and thick, crisp stalks. Different types of chard have different colored ribs – some are white, some are a golden orange and some are red (called ruby or rhubarb chard) – there’s even rainbow chard, but there’s very little difference in taste between these.

    Tomato

    Most pomodori have a sweet, gently tangy flavor and are sensational both raw and cooked. The number of tomato varieties run into the thousands, and they vary in size from the huge steak tomato to tiny cherry tomatoes. As end-of-summer progresses, new varieties of tomatoes will continue ripen on the vine, so now be looking out for the oval Piccadilly, or the oblong San Marzano, and other local heirloom varieties.

    Zucchine (Courgettes)

    Zucchini are at their best from June until September. The best variety is the ribbed “romane” which when young and just-picked, come topped with a beautiful, edible orange flower. You can stuff courgette blossoms with mozzarella or ricotta and a suspicion of oil-packed anchovy, dip in light batter and deep fry; or toss them in olive oil until just wilted, then stir through pasta. Zucchini flowers don’t last so buy and cook them on the same day. They go well with mild cheese like mozzarella or ricotta, crispy pancetta, pasta, as topping for pizza… the list goes on.

    FRUIT

    Apple

    Gala variety apples are in season at the end of summer, and the ones I’ve tasted this year are phenomenal. At their best between September and November – crisp and juicy or more yielding, according to variety – apples are a good source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. An apple a day… you know the drill.

    Blackberry

    Available from the end of July to mid-October, blackberries locally called more in Italian, are wonderfully juicy, bursting with vitamin C and great eaten raw (straight from the hedge!). They can be also cooked in coulis and pies. Look for plump, shiny, tender berries, with none that are mushy or moldy. If you buy a punnet, check that the underside isn’t stained – that means the lower level of berries has been crushed.

    Fig

    Although not juicy, the fig is an incredibly sensuous and luscious fruit, with a delicate aroma and sweet flavor. Originally from Asia, figs are now grown across the Mediterranean and there are hundreds of different varieties, with colors ranging from green to purple/black. At their peak in Italy between August to early September, markets display green varieties as early as mid July, perfect addition to pizza bianca and prosciutto sandwiches! Have an abundance of figs? Watch this video.

    Melon

    The key to purchasing a good quality melon is to find one that’s ripe, which is sometimes a challenge because oftentimes they are picked while still unripe. There are many clues that you can look for to find a ripe melon, a reliable one is smelling the bottom of the cantaloupe (also called the blossom end, opposite from the stem end where the vine was attached). Unripe cantaloupes are likely to have a very faint smell, or no smell at all. Ripe cantaloupes on the other hand, have that spectacular, explosive cantaloupe aroma. To enjoy melon beyond the marriage with paper thin slices of prosciutto, you can purée the cantaloupe pulp along with peeled soft peaches to make a refreshing seasonal cold soup. Or you can slice honeydew melons in half horizontally, scoop out seeds and use each half as a container in which to serve fruit salad splashed with ruby port. Available in Italian markets until October.

    Nectarine

    Available through September, nectarines are the smooth-skinned variety of peach native to China, similarly flavored to peaches with slightly more acidity. The flesh can be light pink, yellow or white and is delicate and sweet. Nectarines are high in vitamins A, B, and C, and are lower in calories than peaches.

    Peach

    Sweet, juicy and fragrant, peaches are one of the most beautiful fruit around. Roughly the size of a tennis ball, they are covered with a velvety down, and most commonly have a red-flecked yellow skin and golden yellow flesh, except for white peaches, which have a pink-blushed cream skin and pinky white flesh. Although the most common are spherical, it’s possible to find flat, disc-shaped varieties of peaches locally called tabacchiere, because they are said to resemble old fashioned tobacco snuff boxes. In the English-speaking world I’ve seen these called Saturn peaches, in season only until September, so hurry!

    Pears

    In season from September through to January, pears boast sweet, granular flesh which is delicate and that bruises easily when ripe, so always buy slightly underripe (they should be firm but not hard). Pears ripen from the inside out! Great paired with aged cheese…

    Prickly Pear (fichi d’india)

    In season September through November, prickly pears – also known as cactus fruit – typically grow on the flat pads of a the nopal, a Central American native cactus that populates many southern Italian regions. A sweet, creamy pulp is concealed by a thorn-studded skin. To get past the prickly exterior and into their sweet, succulent soul you’ll need kitchen tongs, a sharp knife, tweezers and a pair of hefty gardening gloves.

    Plum

    Plum season in Italy extends from late June peaking in August, through Late September. Like all stone fruit, plums are relatives of the peach, nectarine and the almond, so not easily tolerated by people who suffer from nut allergy. The European plum is thought to have been discovered around 2,000 years ago, originating in the area near the Caspian Sea. Even in ancient Roman times, there were already over 300 varieties of European plums! Favorite Italian varieties are the oblong purple cosce di monaca (nun’s thighs) and the tiny, round and green Regina Claudia. Plums are a very good source of vitamin C, they are also a good source of vitamin K, copper, dietary fiber, and potassium.

    Raspberry

    Available from June to September, raspberries have a wonderfully intense, sweet taste, and many consider them to be the finest flavored of all the ‘frutti di bosco’ berries. As raspberries are very delicate, try not to wash them (if organic – or better, self foraged in the wild – there’s no need to). Just pick off any bits of stalk or leaf and serve with cream or gelato.

    Watermelon

    Thought to have originated in Africa, watermelon’s crisp, sweet flesh is phenomenally juicy and refreshing, and an Italian summer staple. There’s a saying in Rome on cocomero, that goes, “magni, bevi e te lavi ‘a faccia” –– describing how the fruit allows you to simultaneously eat, drink and wash your face. Watermelon is great cut into wedges, chopped into fruit salads, which can be added with crumbled ricotta salata and mint for an original twist. Get your watermelon fix as late as October.

    What fruits and vegetables are in season where you live?

    In Season Fruit and Vegetable Shopping Guide

    In season produce may taste better + cost less.

    The list below is a general guide to when veggies and fruits are in season in the Pacific Northwest. Some differences will occur because of varied weather in some areas of the Pacific Northwest or weather changes from year to year. The items with an asterisk (*) after them are not grown in the Pacific Northwest but they are listed because they are popular and can be bought in the Pacific Northwest.

    Year-round mostly for sale at a steady price: Bananas*, Garlic, Mushrooms, Onions, Potatoes

    December: Beets, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Grapefruit*, Kale, Oranges – navel*, Spinach, Winter squash

    January: Beets, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Grapefruit*, Kale, Oranges – navel*, Winter squash

    February: Cabbage, Grapefruit*, Kale, Oranges – navel*, Winter squash

    March: Grapefruit*, Oranges – navel and valencia*

    April: Asparagus, Grapefruit*, Oranges – navel and valencia*, Rhubarb

    May: Asparagus, Grapefruit*, Kale, Lettuce, Oranges – navel and valencia*, Rhubarb, Spinach

    Vegetables in season september

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