WiseGEEK conducted a very visual and informative study and presented a photo series, which compares what 200 calories actually look like in different foods. You’d think that even with the bikini season coming up, a handful of gummy bears couldn’t hurt much, right..? Well, it turns out, just 51 gram of those gives you the same amount of calories as nearly 600 grams of broccoli or 3 whole eggs would. And now be honest – which of those amounts sounds more like a proper and filling 200 calorie meals to you?

The study compares 71 different foods and is originally organized going from low to high calorie density. You can tell how the quantities of these 200 calories snacks are getting smaller towards the end of the list! Statistically, an average adult needs 2000-2500 calories a day, but this, of course, differs depending on how physically active you are. So for those who don’t hesitate to sweat in the gym, a spoonful of peanut butter is a lot less of a sin! And if you are wondering how to count calories in the food you eat, this infographic is here to help.

Website: wisegeek.com

Contents

Apples (385 grams / 13.5 oz)

Butter (28 grams / 0.98 oz)

Broccoli (588 grams / 20.7 oz)

Snickers Chocolate Bar (41 grams / 1.45 oz)

Cooked Pasta (145 grams / 5.11 oz)

Hot Dogs (66 grams / 2.33 oz)

Kiwi Fruit (328 grams / 11.6 oz)

Jack in the Box Cheeseburger (75 grams / 2.6 oz)

Eggs (150 grams / 5.3 oz)

Celery (1425 grams / 50.3 oz)

Blackberry Pie (56 grams / 1.97 oz)

Mini Peppers (740 grams / 26.1 oz)

Canned Black Beans (186 grams / 6.56 oz)

Werther’s Originals Candy (50 grams / 1.76 oz)

Jack in the Box Chicken Sandwich (72 grams / 2.5 oz)

Glazed Doughnut (52 grams / 1.8 oz)

French Sandwich Roll (72 grams / 2.5 oz)

Avocado (125 grams / 4.4 oz)

Canned Sweet Corn (308 grams / 10.9 oz)

Baby Carrots (570 gram / 20.1 oz)

Canned Green Peas (357 grams / 12.6 oz)

Canned Pork and Beans (186 grams / 6.56 oz)

Doritos (41 grams / 1.44 oz)

Dried Apricots (83 grams / 2.9 oz)

Jack in the Box French Fries (73 grams / 2.6 oz)

Fried Bacon (34 grams / 1.2 oz)

Fruit Loops Cereal (51 grams / 1.8 oz)

Grapes (290 grams / 10.2 oz)

Splenda Artifical Sweetener (50 grams / 1.8 oz)

Gummy Bears (51 grams / 1.8 oz)

Hershey Kisses (36 grams / 1.27 oz)

Honeydew Melon (553 grams / 19.5 oz)

Jelly Belly Jelly Beans (54 grams / 1.9 oz)

Ketchup (226 grams / 7.97 oz)

M&M Candy (40 grams / 1.4 oz)

Red Onions (475 grams / 16.75 oz)

Sliced Smoked Turkey (204 grams / 7.2 oz)

Coca Cola (496 ml / 16.77 oz)

Canola Oil (23 grams / 0.8 oz)

Smarties Candy (57 grams / 2 oz)

Tootsie Pops (68 grams / 2.4 oz)

Whole Milk (333 ml / 11.3 fl oz)

Balsamic Vinegar (200 ml / 6.8 fl oz)

Lowfat Strawberry Yogurt (196 grams / 6.9 oz)

Canned Chili con Carne (189 grams / 6.7 oz)

Canned Tuna Packed in Oil (102 grams / 3.6 oz)

Fiber One Cereal (100 grams / 3.5 oz)

Flax Bread (90 grams / 3.17 oz)

Blueberry Muffin (72 grams / 2.5 oz)

Bailey’s Irish Cream (60 ml / 2.02 fl oz)

Cranberry Vanilla Crunch Cereal (55 grams / 1.9 oz)

Cornmeal (55 grams / 1.94 oz)

Wheat Flour (55 grams / 1.94 oz)

Peanut Butter Power Bar (54 grams / 1.9 oz)

Puffed Rice Cereal (54 grams / 1.9 oz)

Puffed Wheat Cereal (53 grams / 1.87 oz)

Brown Sugar (53 grams / 1.87 oz)

Salted Pretzels (52 grams / 1.83 oz)

Medium Cheddar Cheese (51 grams / 1.8 oz)

Potato Chips (37 grams / 1.3oz)

Sliced and Toasted Almonds (35 grams / 1.23 oz)

Peanut Butter (34 grams / 1.2 oz)

Salted Mixed Nuts (33 grams / 1.16 oz)

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What does 100 calories look like?


Eat well

Comparing energy values: a visual guide

This guide shows energy values for 10 different foods. This will help you visualise what 100kcal (420kJ) looks like and manage the number of calories you consume.

This amount, 100kcal, represents just 5% of a woman’s daily reference intake (4% for men), but this quickly adds up when adding ingredients during cooking or when we reach for a snack.

High-fat foods have more energy because fat contains more than double the calories per gram compared with protein and carbohydrates.

Foods containing mainly water, such as vegetables, have even less.

This guide shows how quickly calories can add up in certain foods.

Some of the photos have household objects, such as a pack of cards, to help illustrate the size.

Calories in oil, mayonnaise and butter

All types of fat are high in energy. A gram of fat provides 9kcal, compared with 4kcal for carbohydrate and protein.

Oil and butter are almost pure fat, which is why 420kJ/100kcal is:

  • just a little over 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1 level tablespoon of mayonnaise
  • just under 1 tablespoon of butter (a thick spread of butter on your bread)

A 100-calorie portion of olive oilA 100-calorie portion of mayonnaiseA 100-calorie portion of butter

Calories in cheese

Most cheese is high in fat, so 420kJ/100kcal is just under a 30g matchbox-sized piece of cheddar cheese.

A 100-calorie portion of cheddar

Calories in sugar

Calories in sugar can add up if not used sparingly, especially for people who drink tea or coffee with sugar throughout the day. Four heaped teaspoons of sugar is 420kJ/100kcal.

A 100-calorie portion of sugar

Find out how sugar affects your health

Calories in biscuits

A lot of biscuits are high in fat and sugar and low in nutrients, so 2 ginger nut biscuits add up to 420kJ/100kcal.

Other biscuits may be higher in energy, such as those covered in or filled with chocolate.

A 100-calorie portion of ginger nut biscuits

Calories in crisps

Crisps, which are often high in fat and salt, can quickly add up to 420kJ/100kcal.

For example, the 190g tube of crisps featured in this picture contains nearly 1,000 calories, so just 10% of a tube (9 crisps) equals 420kJ/100kcal.

A 100-calorie portion of crisps

Calories in meat and fish

The kind of meat you eat could make a big difference to the amount of energy you consume.

For example, this is what 100kcal of steak looks like:

A 100-calorie portion of steak

On the other hand, turkey and fish are both low in fat and lower in energy, so 420kJ/100kcal is about 3 slices of turkey or a few spoonfuls of plain large prawns.

A 100-calorie portion of turkey A 100-calorie portion of prawns

Calories in dried fruit

For 420kJ/100kcal, you’ll get just over a 30g portion of raisins.

A 30g serving of dried fruit counts as 1 of your 5 A Day, whereas an 80g serving of fresh fruit, such as grapes or cherries, counts as 1 of your 5 A Day.

100-calorie portions of cherries, grapes and raisins

Calories in fresh fruit

For 420kJ/100kcal, you can tuck into any of the following:

  • a large apple
  • a banana
  • 1.5 grapefruit

100-calorie portions of fresh fruit

These all count towards your 5 A Day, which should include a variety of fruit and vegetables.

Calories in vegetables

Vegetables are generally low in calories, while bringing the added benefits of fibre, vitamins and minerals.

To illustrate this, 420kJ/100kcal is equal to:

  • 3 whole cucumbers
  • 2 heads of lettuce
  • 3 carrots weighing around 120g each

100-calorie portions of veg

Are You There, Thanksgiving? It’s Me, Pie

Listen Listening… / 6:06

It’s Thanksgiving, and of course the most pressing question is: who’s making what? Three VPR reporters set out to find answers and followed the scent … of pie. Literally. This story is about pie and only pie.

‘Pears are a really underrated fruit’

Shana Goldberger runs Sweet Babu, a wholesale and catering bakery in Winooski. On a recent morning, she stood at a kitchen counter with a rolling pin in hand, a stack of pie crusts nearby.

“I’m just rolling out the dough to an even thickness,” she said.

Some of her Thanksgiving pies are sold at a nearby market and others are special orders.

Shana Goldberger removes her extremely-delicious-smelling pear, ginger and bourbon pies from the oven. Credit Elodie Reed / VPR

Goldberger calls herself a self-taught baker, and she said it took her a long time to get the hang of pies.

It’s the crust, Goldberger said, that can be the toughest to master — though chilling the dough for a day, plus using a food processor to mix it up, helps.

“So you want the crust to be flaky and not too tough,” she said. “You want it to be a good base for the filling, and it should taste as good as the inside of the pie does.”

As for the filling, Goldberger encourages people to experiment. She’s a fan of using unexpected fruits in her own pastries. On the morning VPR visited, she made pear-ginger-bourbon pies.

“I feel like pears are a really underrated fruit in general, but especially as a pie fruit,” she said.

Said ‘underrated’ pears going into mini-pies at Sweet Babu. Credit Elodie Reed / VPR

And should anything NOT go in a pie?

Goldberger said making pies from scratch might seem intimidating, but it just takes some practice.

‘Is it too late to order a pie?’

In Mendon, Beth Charles’ family has made a business out of pies. Her parents bought Mendon Mountain Orchards in 1982, and Charles said it’s about 28 acres, with 15 acres devoted to trees.

According to Charles, those trees were planted way back in the 1920s by John Martin Thomas (who history buffs might like to know served as president of Middlebury College). Today about 450 of Thomas’ trees remain, Charles said, and mostly in heritage varieties.

“One of the first years we had the orchard, we had a bumper crop of apples, and we just didn’t even know what to do with them all,” she said. “And my mom said, ‘Oh, I make a pretty good apple pie, why don’t we make some apple pies and sell them?’”

Beth Charles at Mendon Mountain Orchards showing off her apple pie expertise. Credit Nina Keck / VPR

In the run up to Thanksgiving, Charles’ husband peeled many, many apples, and then Charles and her son, Jonathan, make about 1,000 pies. Their work space is small but cozy: The ovens provide a steady hum and the air smells wonderful.

“We pick all our apples that we need for pies. We use a harder apple on the bottom — Northern Spy, I think right now maybe Cortland. Idared is one we like,” Charles explained. “And then a very flavorful apple on top, like a McIntosh, that cooks down more. We like to mix ’em.”

Then comes the sugar mix, the pre-made top crust, and lastly, the fluting. Some of the pies get baked, and some go into the freezer to serve as backups in case they sold out.

According to Beth Charles, ‘it’s never too late’ to order a pie from Mendon Mountain Orchards. Credit Nina Keck / VPR

While Charles and her son worked the pie assembly line during VPR’s recent visit, the phone rang and rang.

“And people will say, ‘Oh, is it too late to order a pie?’ We’re like, ‘It’s never too late!’” Charles said. “You know, people will come in on Thursday and say, ‘I didn’t order’ or ‘I forgot to order’ — that’s the worst. ‘Oh my God, my wife’s going to kill me, I forgot to order a pie.’ No problem, we’ve got you covered.”

A slice for all

When you have to cook 500 pies in a few days, with all of the pressure of the Thanksgiving Day holiday, you better prepare ahead.

At the The Vermont Country Deli in Brattleboro, preparations have been underway for months, according to head baker Doug Sylvester. He said they freeze many of their crusts and then, when the time comes, fresh filling gets added.

Piles of pie crusts The Vermont Country Deli in Brattleboro, where Thanksgiving pie is months in the making. Credit Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

After months of making and freezing pie dough, Sylvester and his crew have been working almost around the clock this week.

Sylvester listed the variety of pie offerings: “We got a double-crust apple. We got the usual crumb-top apple, like the streusel topping. Some gluten-free apple crisp. Cherry pies. Mixed berry pies. Peach-raspberry pies. Pecan, pumpkin, chocolate cream, lemon meringue and coconut cream.”

The bakery is up on the second floor of the business, and down in the store, all of these varieties are lined up and moving briskly. The prepared pumpkin pies sold out just as a fresh batch was being removed from the oven.

Pie for one, pie for all: Sarah Labrecque makes pumpkin pie at The Vermont Country Deli, which donated 20 pies to the Brattleboro Community Thanksgiving dinner this year. Credit Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Twenty of the pumpkin pies will be donated to the Brattleboro Community Thanksgiving dinner, a traditional event that’s approaching its 50th anniversary. Vermont Country Deli manager Tracey John said the dinner is a place for anyone to go who doesn’t want to be alone on the holiday.

Last year, about 200 volunteers helped serve almost 600 meals, and another 150 or so went out by delivery to folks who were shut in. Local farms donate produce, and companies send along turkeys and hams.

And at the end of the meal there is, of course, a slice of pie for anyone who wants it.

What calories look like in different foods

Food calories come in different shapes and sizes — a chocolate bar can pack more calories than one kilogram of vegetables, even though they have extremely different nutritional values. Here, we’ll look at what 200 Calories look like as different foods, as well as discuss the basics about calories. The results will surprise you.

Celery
1425 grams = 200 CaloriesWerther’s Originals Candy
50 grams = 200 Calories

So, what is a calorie? Well, a calorie is a unit of measure for energy. The physical calorie is defined as the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius at a pressure of one atmosphere. However, nutritionists often use “Calorie” as a term for 1000 calories — the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree Celsius.

The large Calorie is thus equal to 1,000 small calories or one kilocalorie. But the main takeaway is that a calorie is not related to nutrients, such as carbs, or food quantities — it simply refers to the energy contained (in food, in this case). In spite of its non-official status, the large Calorie is still widely used as a unit of food energy. The small calorie is also often used for measurements in chemistry, although the amounts involved are typically recorded in kilocalories.

ADVERTISEMENTHot Dogs (66 grams) vs Baby Carrots (570 grams)Peanut Butter (34 grams) vs Kiwi (328 grams)Fries (73 grams) vs Mini Peppers (740 grams)Butter (28 grams) vs Eggs (150 grams)

In many diets today, the calorie is regarded as the end-all, be-all measure of how much you can eat. According to the US Department of Agriculture, the average adult needs to consume about 2,000–2,500 Calories to maintain their weight, though that number can differ significantly based on physical activity and other dietary and environmental factors.

However, as I said earlier, the calorie just measures the energy contained in foods. This means that you could consume the same number of calories eating eat a well-balanced meal (say, a cooked vegetable meal) or by eating some candy bars — obviously, one is not as healthy as the other. So while keeping an eye on calorie intake is important, there are also other factors to consider. The point of the article is to show you just how different 200 calories can be.

Doritos (41 grams) vs Apples (385 grams)

Fried Bacon (34 grams) vs Avocado (125 grams)Gummy Bears
51 grams = 200 CaloriesTootsie Pops
68 grams = 200 Calories

For example, you can have 570 grams of baby carrots, 588 grams of broccoli or 553 grams of melon — each has 200 Calories. But then again, so does 60 mL of Baileys cream, a bite of blackberry pie, and a 54-gram peanut power bar.

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It’s no definite standard, but as a rule of thumb, raw, healthier foods have fewer calories per gram than more condensed, more intensely-processed unhealthy foods such as sweets and bacon. Have just 4 tootsie pops — BAM, that’s 200 calories. Same goes for 17 gummy bears. Canola oil is the most calorically condensed thing here, with 200 Calories in a mere 23 grams — little more than a teaspoon.

Bailey’s Irish Cream
60 ml = 200 CaloriesCoca-Cola
496 ml = 200 CaloriesWhole Milk
333 ml = 200 Calories

But it’s not just foods that can have lots of calories. As I’ve said, it takes just a bit more than a shot of Baileys to reach 200 Calories, and alcohol generally tends to pack a lot of calories. That’s why people take drinks of spirits to ‘warm up’. Half a liter of Coca-Cola does the trick, while it takes only 333 milliliters of milk to get to 200 Calories.

Here are a few more examples; hopefully these can provide a general guideline for foods that tend to have a lot of calories.

What Does 2,500 Calories Look Like?

Picture 2,500 calories. Do you have an image in your mind? Depending on the foods you prefer or whatever’s easiest for you to visualize, you might imagine a small pile of fast-food hamburgers, a carton of ice cream, or a plate of fresh fruits and vegetables. In other words, what to put on your plate to achieve 2,500 calories can vary drastically in terms of quantity, quality, and macronutrient composition.

But if you believe that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie, then 2,500 of them should have the same impact on your body no matter what foods you eat, right?

Well, we’re not so sure. You can eat 2,500 calories in a day, but how these calories are broken up into protein, carbs, and fat can have a big impact on your physique, performance, and general health.

To help you visualize what 2,500 calories looks like as actual food from different popular diet plans, we’ve created daily meal plans out of three common macronutrient ratios of protein to carbohydrates to fat: 40/40/20, 30/20/50, and 20/50/30.

The 40/40/20 ratio is the typical low-fat, high-protein bodybuilder diet many of us are accustomed to seeing. The 30/20/50 ratio is a relatively high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. The 20/50/30 ratio represents what the typical American diet looks like.

The calories will be the same in each daily diet, but the food on the plates is going to look vastly different. Using these photos, you’ll be able to distinguish what type of macro ratio you’d like to utilize according to your goals and tastes!

Build Your Own Nutrition Plan

To figure out your own caloric needs, how those calories get broken down into macro ratios, and how many grams of each macronutrient you should eat per day, you’ll have to do a little math. It’s not hard, though. If you passed fifth grade, you should be fine.

Use this calculator to determine your total daily caloric intake.

Calorie Calculator

Age Sex Male Female Height Feet Meters Weight Pounds Kilograms Goal Fat Loss Maintenance Muscle Gainz Activity Level Lightly active (moderate exercise but sedentary job) Moderately active (intense exercise but sedentary job) Very active (moderate exercise and active job) Extra active (intense exercise and active job) Calculate

If you have a desk job, we suggest that you estimate light or moderate activity on your activity level, even if you hit the gym hard 5-6 days per week.

Once you have your caloric intake figured out, it’s time to choose a macro ratio. In general, the 40/40/20 choice works for most people, but if you like a little more fat in your diet, feel free to change the numbers depending on your tastes.

Once you know your macro ratio, it’s time to put those percents to good use and turn them into actual calories. For example, let’s say you’re going to eat 2,500 calories in a 40/40/20 split. In that case, 40 percent of your total (1,000 calories) would come from protein; 40 percent (1,000 calories) would come from carbs; and 20 percent (500 calories) would be from fat.

When you know how many calories you should eat from each subgroup, divide them by the calories in 1 gram of each macro. A gram of carbohydrate has 4 calories, one gram of protein has 4, and one gram of fat has 9.

So, continuing with 2,500 calories broken down into 40/40/20, 1,000 calories from protein would be 250 grams; 1,000 calories from carbs would be 250 grams; and 500 calories from fat would be 55 grams. Every day, you’ll aim to eat 250 grams of protein, 250 grams of carbs, and 55 grams of fat. Voila!

Once you know those numbers, all you have to do is fill them in with actual food like we’ve done here. Use this handy visual guide to build your own perfect diet based on your preferred macronutrient ratio!

2,500 Calories in Five Meals

Breakfast

2 whole eggs
1 cup egg whites
1 cup oats
1 cup blueberries
2 tbsp pure maple syrup 4 whole eggs, scrambled
1 slice cheddar cheese
2 slices whole-wheat toast
1/4 cup sliced avocado 2 6-inch buttermilk pancakes
2 slices bacon
2 pats butter
3 tbsp pure maple syrup Total:
Calories 595
Fat 15 g
Carbs 75 g
Protein 40 g Total:
Calories 716
Fat 44 g
Carbs 39 g
Protein 41 g Total:
Calories 673
Fat 29.4 g
Carbs 85 g
Protein 17 g

40/40/20

2 whole eggs
1 cup egg whites
1 cup oats
1 cup blueberries
2 tbsp pure maple syrup
Total:
Calories 595
Fat 15 g
Carbs 75 g
Protein 40 g

30/20/50

4 whole eggs, scrambled
1 slice cheddar cheese
2 slices whole-wheat toast
1/4 cup sliced avocado
Total:
Calories 716
Fat 44 g
Carbs 39 g
Protein 41 g

20/50/30

2 6-inch buttermilk pancakes

2 slices bacon
2 pat butter
3 tbsp pure maple syrup
Total:
Calories 673
Fat 29.4 g
Carbs 85 g
Protein 17 g

Snack

2 scoops whey protein isolate
1 medium apple 1 scoop whey protein
1/3 cup raw almonds 1 medium banana
1 cup oatmeal Total:
Calories 376
Fat 4 g
Carbs 35 g
Protein 50 g Total:
Calories 337.4
Fat 19 g
Carbs 11 g
Protein 30.6 g Total:
Calories 286
Fat 4 g
Carbs 55.1 g
Protein 7.5 g 2 scoops whey protein isolate
1 medium apple
Total:
Calories 376
Fat 4 g
Carbs 35 g
Protein 50 g 1 scoop whey protein
1/3 cup raw almonds
Total:
Calories 337.4
Fat 19 g
Carbs 11 g
Protein 30.6 g 1 medium banana
1 cup oatmeal
Total:
Calories 286
Fat 4 g
Carbs 55.1 g
Protein 7.5 g

The Power of Protein

While you probably already know this, protein is easily one of the most important macronutrients when it comes to building muscle, if not the most important. Protein is responsible for tissue growth and repair, so it’s integral to muscle recovery and growth.

If you don’t already have a protein supplement in your cupboard, consider buying one now to integrate into your meal plans and to drink after your weightlifting workouts. Protein supplements like whey are convenient, low-calorie, fast-digesting, and easy to fit into any configuration of 2,500 calories.

Lunch

6 oz. chicken breast
1 cup chopped broccoli, steamed
1 cup long-grain brown rice 5 oz. 95/5 ground beef
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 cup shredded lettuce
2-3 tbsp fresh tomato salsa
1/4 cup shredded cheddar
1 tbsp sour cream 1 “everything” bagel
4 oz. sliced turkey
2 slices tomato
1 lettuce leaf
1 slice cheddar cheese
1 tsp mustard
2 slices avocado Total:
Calories: 419
Fat 6.5 g
Carbs 45 g
Protein 45 g Total:
Calories 591
Fat 36.6 g
Carbs 14.5 g
Protein 51 g Total:
Calories 632
Fat 20 g
Carbs 70.4 g
Protein 42.5 g 6 oz. chicken breast
1 cup chopped broccoli, steamed
1 cup long-grain brown rice
Total:
Calories: 419
Fat 6.5 g
Carbs 45 g
Protein 45 g 5 oz. 95/5 ground beef
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 cup shredded lettuce
2-3 tbsp fresh tomato salsa
1/4 shredded cheddar
1 tbsp sour cream
Total:
Calories 591
Fat 36.6 g
Carbs 14.5 g
Protein 51 g 1 “everything” bagel
4 oz. sliced turkey
2 slices tomato
1 lettuce leaf
1 slice cheddar cheese
1 tsp mustard
2 slices avocado
Total:
Calories 632
Fat 20 g
Carbs 70.4 g
Protein 42.5 g
1 bag Quest sour cream and cheddar protein chips
1 scoop whey protein
1 medium orange 2 tbsp all-natural peanut butter
1 medium apple
1 container 2% Greek yogurt 1 container Greek yogurt
1/2 cup raspberries
1 oz. pretzels Total:
Calories 476
Fat 4 g
Carbs 64 g
Protein 46 g Total:
Calories 395
Fat 17 g
Carbs 37.5 g
Protein 23 g Total:
Calories 248
Fat 4 g
Carbs 36 g
Protein 17 g 1 bag Quest sour cream and cheddar protein chips
1 scoop whey protein
1 medium orange
Total:
Calories 476
Fat 4 g
Carbs 64 g
Protein 46 g 2 tbsp all-natural peanut butter
1 medium apple
1 container 2% Greek yogurt
Total:
Calories 395
Fat 17 g
Carbs 37.5 g
Protein 23 g 1 container Greek yogurt
1/2 cup raspberries
1 oz. pretzels
Total:
Calories 248
Fat 4 g
Carbs 36 g
Protein 17 g

Dinner

6 oz. steak
1 medium sweet potato
1 pat butter
15 asparagus spears, chopped
1 cup sliced carrots
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 6 oz. Atlantic salmon
1 cup green beans
2 pat butter 4 oz. chicken breast, sliced
1 cup white rice, cooked
1/2 chopped bell pepper
Green onion, chopped
1/2 onion, chopped
1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 egg
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil Total:
Calories 676
Fat 28 g
Carbs 46 g
Protein 60 g Total:
Calories 457
Fat 22 g
Carbs 27.5 g
Protein 37.3 g Total:
Calories 609
Fat 21 g
Carbs 55 g
Protein 50 g 6 oz. steak
1 medium sweet potato
1 pat butter
15 asparagus spears, chopped
1 cup sliced carrots
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Total:
Calories 676
Fat 28 g
Carbs 46 g
Protein 60 g 6 oz. Atlantic salmon
1 cup green beans
2 pat butter
Total:
Calories 457
Fat 22 g
Carbs 27.5 g
Protein 37.3 g 4 oz. chicken breast, sliced
1 cup white rice, cooked
1/2 chopped bell pepper
Green onion, chopped
1/2 onion, chopped
1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 egg
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Total:
Calories 609
Fat 21 g
Carbs 55 g
Protein 50 g

40/40/20: ALL MEALS

Daily Total:
Calories 2,542
Fat 57.5 g
Carbs 265 g
Protein 241 g Ideal Total:
Calories 2,500
Fat 55 g
Carbs 250 g
Protein 250 g

If you like eating, the traditional bodybuilding plan is great because you get to consume a pretty high volume of food. If you like a little more fat in your diet, though, you may want to consider a different option.

30/20/50: ALL MEALS

Daily Total:
Calories 2,496
Fat 139 g
Carbs 120 g
Protein 183 g Ideal Total:
Calories 2,500
Fat 135 g
Carbs 125 g
Protein 185 g

Because fat is so caloric, the volume of food you’d eat on this diet will feel small. However, fat is much more filling than carbohydrates, so you don’t have to eat as much to feel full.

20/50/30: ALL MEALS

Daily Total:
Calories 2,448
Fat 79 g
Carbs 301 g
Protein 134 g Ideal Total:
Calories 2,500
Fat 85 g
Carbs 300 g
Protein 125 g

Although this macro ratio may not fit with your physique goals, a few alterations like making protein pancakes instead of regular ones, or choosing a wrap instead of a bagel, will still allow you to eat some of these yummy meals.

What calories look like?

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